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Grambling vs. Montana State: Sportsbook promo codes, odds, spread, over/under – NCAA Tournament First Four

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Grambling vs. Montana State: Sportsbook promo codes, odds, spread, over/under – NCAA Tournament First Four


The Grambling Tigers (20-14) are looking to earn a spot in the Round of 64 in the NCAA Tournament bracket in their First Four matchup with the Montana State Bobcats (17-17) on Wednesday at UD Arena, beginning at 6:40 PM ET.

In this article, you can find odds and spreads for the Montana State vs. Grambling matchup across multiple sportsbooks.

Grambling vs. Montana State Game Info

  • When: Wednesday, March 20, 2024 at 6:40 PM ET
  • Where: UD Arena in Dayton, Ohio
  • How to Watch on TV: truTV

Catch college basketball action all season long on Fubo!

Sportsbook Promo Codes

Grambling vs. Montana State Odds, Spread, Over/Under

Here’s a look at the odds, spread and over/under for this matchup across different sportsbooks.

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Grambling vs. Montana State Betting Trends

  • Grambling is 17-14-0 ATS this year.
  • The Tigers are 4-6 ATS this season when playing as at least 4.5-point underdogs.
  • Montana State is 16-15-0 ATS this season.
  • Bobcats games have hit the over 17 out of 31 times this season.

Grambling Futures Odds

  • Odds to win the national championship: +100000
  • Grambling ranks 67th in the country in terms of national championship odds (+100000). However, our computer rankings are significantly less confident, ranking the team 262nd, a difference of 195 spots.
  • Grambling has a 0.1% chance of winning the national championship, based on its moneyline odds.

Check out all the futures bets available at BetMGM!

Not all offers available in all states, please visit BetMGM for the latest promotions for your area. Must be 21+ to gamble, please wager responsibly. If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, contact 1-800-GAMBLER.

© 2023 Data Skrive. All rights reserved.



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Jury: BNSF Railway contributed to 2 deaths in Montana town where asbestos sickened thousands

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Jury: BNSF Railway contributed to 2 deaths in Montana town where asbestos sickened thousands


A federal jury on Monday said Warren Buffett’s BNSF Railway contributed to the deaths of two people who were exposed to asbestos decades ago when tainted mining material was shipped through a Montana town where thousands have been sickened.

The jury awarded $4 million each in compensatory damages to the estates of the two plaintiffs, who died in 2020. The jury did not find that BNSF acted intentionally or with indifference so there will be no punitive damages awarded.

Attorneys for the estates of the two victims had argued that the railroad, owned by Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway conglomerate, knew the asbestos-tainted vermiculite was dangerous but failed to act.

BNSF said its employees didn’t know the vermiculite they hauled over decades from a nearby mine was filled with hazardous microscopic asbestos fibers.

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The case in federal civil court over the two deaths was the first of numerous lawsuits against the Texas-based railroad corporation to reach trial over its past operations in Libby. Current and former residents of the small town near the U.S.-Canada border want BNSF held accountable, accusing it of playing a role in asbestos exposure that health officials say has killed several hundred people and sickened thousands.

The railroad said it was obliged under law to ship the vermiculite, which was used in insulation and for other commercial purposes, and that W.R. Grace employees had concealed the health hazards from the railroad.

BNSF attorney Chad Knight said the railroad could only be held liable if it could have foreseen the health hazards of asbestos based on information available decades ago when the alleged exposures happened.

“In the 50s, 60s and 70s no one in the public suspected there might be health concerns,” Knight said Friday.

The plaintiffs argued that BNSF higher-ups knew for decades that the vermiculite contained asbestos and that concerns about workers breathing asbestos dust had existed in medical journals since the late 1890s.

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“We’re here to make a party that accepts zero responsibility accept an appropriate amount of responsibility,” plaintiffs’ attorney Mark Lanier said in his closing statement. “This is the fault of the bigwigs in the corporate office.”

The judge instructed the jury it could only find the railroad negligent based on its actions in the Libby Railyard, not for hauling the vermiculite.

BNSF was formed in 1995 from the merger of Burlington Northern railroad, which operated in Libby for decades, and the Santa Fe Pacific Corporation.

Berkshire Hathaway, based in Nebraska and chaired by Buffett, acquired BNSF in 2010.

Looming over the proceedings was W.R. Grace, which operated a mountaintop vermiculite mine 7 miles (11 kilometers) outside of Libby until it closed in 1990. The Maryland-based company played a central role in Libby’s tragedy and has paid significant settlements to victims.

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U.S. District Court Judge Brian Morris referred to the the chemical company as “the elephant in the room” during the BNSF trial and reminded jurors repeatedly that the case was about the railroad’s conduct, not W.R. Grace’s separate liability.

Federal prosecutors in 2005 indicted W. R. Grace and executives from the company on criminal charges over the contamination in Libby. A jury acquitted them following a 2009 trial.

The Environmental Protection Agency descended on Libby after 1999 news reports of illnesses and deaths among mine workers and their families. In 2009 the agency declared in Libby the nation’s first ever public health emergency under the federal Superfund cleanup program.

The pollution in Libby has been cleaned up, largely at public expense. Yet the long timeframe over which asbestos-related diseases develop means people previously exposed are likely to continue getting sick for years to come, health officials say.

The seven-member federal jury had been instructed to decide if the railroad was at fault in the deaths and if so, the amount of damages to award to their estates. A separate proceeding would be needed to determine the amount of any punitive damages.

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A second trial against the railroad over the death of a Libby resident is scheduled for May in federal court in Missoula.



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Path to a better TB vaccine runs through Montana

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Path to a better TB vaccine runs through Montana


Jim Robbins

(KFF) A team of Montana researchers is playing a key role in the development of a more effective vaccine against tuberculosis, an infectious disease that has killed more people than any other.

The BCG (Bacille Calmette-Guérin) vaccine, created in 1921, remains the sole TB vaccine. While it is 40% to 80% effective in young children, its efficacy is very low in adolescents and adults, leading to a worldwide push to create a more powerful vaccine.

One effort is underway at the University of Montana Center for Translational Medicine. The center specializes in improving and creating vaccines by adding what are called novel adjuvants. An adjuvant is a substance included in the vaccine, such as fat molecules or aluminum salts, that enhances the immune response, and novel adjuvants are those that have not yet been used in humans. Scientists are finding that adjuvants make for stronger, more precise, and more durable immunity than antigens, which create antibodies, would alone.

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Eliciting specific responses from the immune system and deepening and broadening the response with adjuvants is known as precision vaccination. “It’s not one-size-fits-all,” said Ofer Levy, a professor of pediatrics at Harvard University and the head of the Precision Vaccines Program at Boston Children’s Hospital. “A vaccine might work differently in a newborn versus an older adult and a middle-aged person.”

The ultimate precision vaccine, said Levy, would be lifelong protection from a disease with one jab. “A single-shot protection against influenza or a single-shot protection against covid, that would be the holy grail,” Levy said.

Jay Evans, the director of the University of Montana center and the chief scientific and strategy officer and a co-founder of Inimmune, a privately held biotechnology company in Missoula, said his team has been working on a TB vaccine for 15 years. The private-public partnership is developing vaccines and trying to improve existing vaccines, and he said it’s still five years off before the TB vaccine might be distributed widely.

It has not gone unnoticed at the center that this state-of-the-art vaccine research and production is located in a state that passed one of the nation’s most extreme anti-vaccination laws during the pandemic in 2021. The law prohibits businesses and governments from discriminating against people who aren’t vaccinated against covid-19 or other diseases, effectively banning both public and private employers from requiring workers to get vaccinated against covid or any other disease. A federal judge later ruled that the law cannot be enforced in health care settings, such as hospitals and doctors’ offices.

In mid-March, the Bill & Melinda Gates Medical Research Institute announced it had begun the third and final phase of clinical trials for the new vaccine in seven countries. The trials should take about five years to complete. Research and production are being done in several places, including at a manufacturing facility in Hamilton owned by GSK, a giant pharmaceutical company.

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Known as the forgotten pandemic, TB kills up to 1.6 million people a year, mostly in impoverished areas in Asia and Africa, despite its being both preventable and treatable. The U.S. has seen an increase in tuberculosis over the past decade, especially with the influx of migrants, and the number of cases rose by 16% from 2022 to 2023. Tuberculosis is the leading cause of death among people living with HIV, whose risk of contracting a TB infection is 20 times as great as people without HIV.

“TB is a complex pathogen that has been with human beings for ages,” said Alemnew Dagnew, who heads the program for the new vaccine for the Gates Medical Research Institute. “Because it has been with human beings for many years, it has evolved and has a mechanism to escape the immune system. And the immunology of TB is not fully understood.”

The University of Montana Center for Translational Medicine and Inimmune together have 80 employees who specialize in researching a range of adjuvants to understand the specifics of immune responses to different substances. “You have to tailor it like tools in a toolbox towards the pathogen you are vaccinating against,” Evans said. “We have a whole library of adjuvant molecules and formulations.”

Vaccines are made more precise largely by using adjuvants. There are three basic types of natural adjuvants: aluminum salts; squalene, which is made from shark liver; and some kinds of saponins, which are fat molecules. It’s not fully understood how they stimulate the immune system. The center in Missoula has also created and patented a synthetic adjuvant, UM-1098, that drives a specific type of immune response and will be added to new vaccines.

One of the most promising molecules being used to juice up the immune system response to vaccines is a saponin molecule from the bark of the quillay tree, gathered in Chile from trees at least 10 years old. Such molecules were used by Novavax in its covid vaccine and by GSK in its widely used shingles vaccine, Shingrix. These molecules are also a key component in the new tuberculosis vaccine, known as the M72 vaccine.

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But there is room for improvement.

“The vaccine shows 50% efficacy, which doesn’t sound like much, but basically there is no effective vaccine currently, so 50% is better than what’s out there,” Evans said. “We’re looking to take what we learned from that vaccine development with additional adjuvants to try and make it even better and move 50% to 80% or more.”

By contrast, measles vaccines are 95% effective.

According to Medscape, around 15 vaccine candidates are being developed to replace the BCG vaccine, and three of them are in phase 3 clinical trials.

One approach Evans’ center is researching to improve the new vaccine’s efficacy is taking a piece of the bacterium that causes TB, synthesizing it, and combining it with the adjuvant QS-21, made from the quillay tree. “It stimulates the immune system in a way that is specific to TB and it drives an immune response that is even closer to what we get from natural infections,” Evans said.

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The University of Montana center is researching the treatment of several problems not commonly thought of as treatable with vaccines. They are entering the first phase of clinical trials for a vaccine for allergies, for instance, and first-phase trials for a cancer vaccine. And later this year, clinical trials will begin for vaccines to block the effects of opioids like heroin and fentanyl. The University of Montana received the largest grant in its history, $33 million, for anti-opioid vaccine research. It works by creating an antibody that binds with the drug in the bloodstream, which keeps it from entering the brain and creating the high.

For now, though, the eyes of health care experts around the world are on the trials for the new TB vaccines, which, if they are successful, could help save countless lives in the world’s poorest places.





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Montana State Bobcats stage comeback to top Montana Grizzlies in men’s tennis

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Montana State Bobcats stage comeback to top Montana Grizzlies in men’s tennis


BOZEMAN — Montana State freshman Kanika Jayathilake knew how it looked during the third set of his decisive match against Montana’s Chris Zhang during Sunday’s Brawl of the Wild men’s tennis match.

“I probably looked dead on the court because I wasn’t saying anything in the third set,” Jayathilake said, “but it was to help me breathe and regulate my (body), and it worked. Finding the method that works for me, which is maybe not being as loud as I am off the court, is probably better for me in matches.”

Jayathilake’s method proved wildly effective. He survived a third set service break to fall behind 5-3, dealt Zhang two breaks of his own, then served out match point at 40-30 to clinch his own victory at No. 6 singles and hand the Bobcats a 4-3 win over their arch rivals in front of 150 spectators at the Bobcat-Anderson Tennis Center.

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“The freshmen at four, five and six were huge,” said Montana State head coach Rob Bareford. “Their first Brawl of the Wild, at home, tons of fans, and they stepped up when their team needed them.”

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That the Bobcats would need Jayathilake’s efforts at No. 6 singles seemed improbable for much of the afternoon. The Grizzlies captured the doubles point to take a 1-0 lead, the after Tom Bittner’s straight-sets win over MSU’s Max Relic led 2-0. Bobcat freshman Rayen Hermassi took a 6-2, 7-6 (7-3) win at No. 4, Tom Bittner’s win 6-2, 7-6 (7-5) over Bobcat Max Relic at No. 1 singles pushed the Grizzlies one win from victory.

On court three, Bobcat grad transfer Max Relic split the first two sets with UM’s Fernando Perez, but powered to a 6-3 set three win to close the team score to 3-2.

“Andras coming through on Senior Day, his last home match here, that was huge,” Bareford said. “You couldn’t write a better story.”

Except that MSU’s freshmen at No. 5 and No. 6 singles, Andre Stewart and Jayathilake, set about doing just that. Stewart dropped the first set 6-0, owing largely to serving struggles.

“The first set I served horribly,” Stewart said with a smile, “that’s why I got bageled six-love. Honestly, I don’t think I made a first serve in the first set.”

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Stewart bounced back with a 6-3 win in set two as his serving form returned, then took a 6-4 victory in set three.

“The second and third sets I served well enough,” he said. “I got my first serve in. That’s really important against a player like (Moeritz Stoeger).”

Once Stewart returned to form, Bareford said his attention shifted.

“Honestly, I didn’t have any worries about Andre,” he said. “I knew he was going to come back, I knew he wasn’t playing anywhere close to his level, and I knew he was going to be fine. Once he won the second set I kind of left him alone because I knew he was going to win the third and I wanted to be on Kani’s court.”

Jayathilake won the first set at No. 6 singles against Zhang 7-6, scoring the final three points in the tiebreaker to capture it 8-6. Set two also went to the seven-point tiebreaker, and after Jayathilake dashed out to a 6-2 lead Zhang scored four straight to tie the score. The two traded points until Jayathilake took a 10-9 lead. At that point Zhang won three straight points to take the second set, 7-6 (12-10).

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Jayathilake said he didn’t feel discouraged, instead reaching deep inside.

“I just felt like I’ve put in so much work and am not playing how I wish I could play after four months (at MSU),” he said. “After I lost that second set those thoughts came back, but I think the difference in this match versus other ones is that I stopped caring, I kept trying but I thought I was caring too much about everyone else. I just had to let go and do whatever works, just send it.”

Jayathilake, an Australian, and Zhang, originally from New Zealand, stayed on serve through the first seven games of the third set, but leading 4-3 Zhang broke Jayathilake’s serve to take a 5-3 lead. At the point of elimination, Jayathilake fought back with a service break of his own, then held serve to knot things at 5-5. Jayathilake jumped out to a 40-0 lead then broke serve at 40-15 to take a 6-5 lead. Zhang led 15-0 and 30-15 in the decisive game, but Jayathilake served out the next three points to clinch the match.

“It was a great moment,” Bareford said of Jayathilake’s win and the Bobcat team rushing him to celebrate. “I was definitely trying to be on his court because (Zhang is) his buddy from back home in Australia and they played right before (Jayathilake) came to college and Kani lost, so I knew that was going to be a tough one.”

Jayathilake said the victory over his long-time friend was especially meaningful.

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“He is the guy that helped me come to college,” Jayathilake said. “I trained with him in Australia, so he was the last person that I was hitting with before I came here.”

And then Jayathilake smiled.

“He wanted me to go to his school,” he said. “But thank God I didn’t. This is great.”

Montana State’s five-hour, 20-minute win raised the team’s record to 9-11 overall and 4-4 in Big Sky play, while the Grizzlies fell to 14-9 overall, 4-4 in the league. The Cats enter next week’s Big Sky Tournament as the fifth seed, playing fourth-seeded Weber State on Thursday, while the Grizzlies grab the sixth seed and face Idaho State.

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