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A New Study Confirms Texas Abortion Ban “Is Responsible” for Rise in Infant Deaths

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A New Study Confirms Texas Abortion Ban “Is Responsible” for Rise in Infant Deaths


Texas leaders promised the ban, enacted ten months before Roe was overturned, would “save” newborn lives.

A protester at Trafalgar Square following the abortion ban in Texas, on October 2, 2021, in London, United Kingdom.

(Photo by Hasan Esen / Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

Before thousands of anti-abortion protesters at the Texas Capitol in 2023, Republican Gov. Greg Abbott brazenly touted his party’s passage of draconian abortion laws as “life-saving.” “We promised we would protect the life of every child with a heartbeat, and we did. I signed a law doing exactly that,” Abbott told the crowd at the annual Texas Rally For Life event. “All of you are life savers, and thousands of newborn babies are the result of your heroic efforts.”

Abbott’s words now ring particularly hollow in light of a new study in the Journal of the American Medical Association Pediatrics that reveals infant deaths in Texas starkly increased following SB 8, which barred care at the first sign of embryonic cardiac activity, typically around six weeks of pregnancy, and carried a private enforcement provision that deterred the vast majority of care in the state. The 2021 law stood as the most restrictive abortion ban at the time. 

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Researchers with Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that infant deaths rose by nearly 13 percent in 2022. Comparatively, these deaths, defined in the study as occurring under 12 months old, increased less than 2 percent in the rest of the United States. 

“We found that infant mortality increased pretty substantially in Texas but not in the rest of the country,” Alison Gemmill, assistant professor in the Bloomberg School’s Department of Population, Family and Reproductive Health and one of the study’s lead authors, tells The Nation. “It speaks to how these restrictive laws can have horrific and devastating effects on infant health, pregnant people, and on families overall—unintended or not.”

While many reproductive health studies (including ones that show a link among infant mortality and abortion bans) can only prove a correlation between factors, this one notably claims a direct causation, providing important evidence of the law’s dire impacts. “This study shows that the state policy is responsible for these deaths—there is a very, very strong causal link here,” says Gemmill. 

The research is said to be one of the first large-scale studies to highlight the spillover effects of anti-abortion laws in the United States on maternal and infant health. By analyzing monthly death certificate data, researchers were able to isolate and examine outcomes of what would happen with and without the law.

Congenital anomalies—birth defects that can include fatal conditions of the heart, spine, and brain—lead the cause of death among infants, researchers found. These deaths spiked nearly 23 percent in Texas between 2021 and 2022, compared to a decrease of 3.1 percent in the rest of the U.S. during the same period. Glaringly, the Texas abortion law holds no exception for fatal fetal anomaly, which are typically diagnosed later than six weeks.

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Those unable to access abortion care were forced to “experience the physical risks of continuing the pregnancy and the emotional and psychological hardships of losing a pregnancy in this way,” Dr. Gracia Sierra, a Texas-based data scientist who focuses on infant mortality and the impact of abortion bans at Resound Research for Reproductive Health (unaffiliated with the study) tells The Nation. “The process can be difficult and painful, and it ultimately takes away their freedom to make their own decisions about their reproductive life.”

In response to the study, Abbott’s office doubled down on its ostensible “pro-life” agenda, despite the findings. It applauded a study from the same Johns Hopkins researchers that found SB 8 may have resulted in nearly 10,000 additional births.“Texas is a pro-life state, and Governor Abbott will always fight for the most vulnerable among us,” Andrew Mahaleris, spokesperson for Abbott, told The Nation. “Texas passed a critical law to save the innocent unborn, and now thousands of children have been given a chance at life.” 

While Abbott and anti-abortion advocates continue to laud the measure as life-saving, in reality this means perpetuating forced births—no matter the outcome of that birth. 

“It’s never been clearer that the term ‘pro-life’ is a farce,” says Nicolas Kabat, staff attorney at the Center for Reproductive Rights. “Politicians are forcing women to carry doomed pregnancies and give birth to babies who will live only a few painful minutes or hours. This suffering is man-made – it’s being inflicted by Texas lawmakers.”

Women who recently fought the state of Texas in court after being denied abortion care despite severe pregnancy complications are all too familiar with the state’s forced birth policy. Zurawski v. Texas, a legal challenge filed by 22 women, sought to provide much needed clarity to the abortion laws’ vague medical exceptions. 

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Samantha Casiano, one of nearly a dozen women in the lawsuit who faced a non-viable pregnancy, was forced to watch her baby slowly die. Diagnosed with the lethal condition anencephaly, her child would be born without a skull. The mother of four lacked the resources to travel for abortion care, and had no choice but to carry her fatal pregnancy to term. In court, Casiano tearfully recounted how she watched her baby gasp for air for four hours before ultimately dying. “I told her, I am so sorry I couldn’t release you to heaven sooner. There was no mercy for her,” she said. The trauma will haunt her and her family forever, said Casiano. 

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Last month, the all-Republican Texas Supreme Court failed to provide clarity on the laws or grant any relief for those who might suffer the same fate as Casiano, issuing a ruling that confirmed pregnant people cannot have abortions for fetal diagnoses of any kind, even lethal ones. The Center for Reproductive Rights’ Kabat, who represented the plaintiffs in Zurawski, says the recent study is a stark reminder that the state is uninterested in taking responsibility for deaths like the one Casiano and others were forced to painfully endure. 

Gemmill says this is the first of many studies to come. Researchers are now working to assess the impact of abortion restrictions on the live births of different races, ethnicities, and socio-economic backgrounds. They’re also examining infant mortality in Texas from 2022 forward and taking a look at those rates across the country. 

They predict what they’ve found in Texas foreshadows what is happening in more than a dozen states that have also barred abortion care, since Texas enacted its law ten months before Roe was overturned. At least 13 states similarly carry no exception for fatal fetal anomalies, which impact roughly 120,000 pregnancies a year. 

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“This will likely be a harbinger of what’s to come for other banned states, since Texas is nearly a year ahead of everyone else,” says Gemmill. 

“Unless we get a flood of resources for patients to seek care across state lines, I really don’t see this increase in infant deaths changing. I don’t have any reason to think this wouldn’t persist into the future.” 

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Mary Tuma

Mary Tuma is a Texas-based freelance journalist who covers reproductive rights. Her reporting has appeared in The GuardianViceThe New York Times, the Texas ObserverRewire News GroupThe Austin ChronicleThe Progressive, Ms.HuffPostSalon, and others.





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Texas

Texas True Crime: Deal with the Devil

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Texas True Crime: Deal with the Devil


HOUSTON, Texas (KTRK) — “She’s as cold as ice,” said the caller to the 911 dispatcher. “I think she’s deceased.”

It was 4:06 a.m. on Saturday, February 9, 2014. A girl’s beaten body was found in a vacant apartment in Clear Lake, Texas.

“It looks like there’s a toilet bowl lid thing-you know from the back of the tank?” said the caller. “It’s smashed up all over the place. I think that might be what they used to kill her.”

It was dark and dank in that empty apartment with no power, but pieces of that white porcelain toilet tank lid were shattered and strewn about.

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Authorities would later identify the murdered girl as 15-year-old Corriann Cervantes. She had been killed four days earlier, by two teens she trusted.

Now, ten years after her brutal murder, Corriann’s family is telling their story.

In our latest Texas True Crime episode, you’ll hear never released, exclusive interviews with the people who helped send Corriann’s killers to prison. You’ll see how police got a 16-year-old to confess to murder. And, for the first time, a convicted killer talks.

“Deal with the Devil” is now streaming on ABC 13.

Watch Texas True Crime on your favorite streaming devices, like Roku, FireTV, AppleTV and GoogleTV. Just search “ABC13 Houston.”

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Texas Standard for July 24, 2024: Texas teen Sam Watson sets speed climbing records ahead of Paris Olympics

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Texas Standard for July 24, 2024: Texas teen Sam Watson sets speed climbing records ahead of Paris Olympics


Here are the stories on Texas Standard for Wednesday, July 24, 2024. Check back later today for updated story links and audio.

Texas Republicans scramble to rethink strategy as Kamala Harris gets Democratic support

The political world is still adjusting to the seismic shift that Vice President Kamala Harris will likely assume the Democratic presidential nomination, instead of incumbent President Joe Biden.

How will Texas Republicans change campaign strategy in a post-Biden election cycle? Public affairs expert and consultant Brendan Steinhauser has worked with several Texas GOP candidates and joins the Standard with more.

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Sheila Jackson Lee’s death leaves a void in Texas’ 18th District. Who will fill it?

Democratic U.S. Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee served Texas’ 18th District from 1995 until her death on Friday. She was a familiar face at community events in Central Houston and northern Harris County and was expected to win another term this November.

Her passing now raises questions about who will take her place. Houston Chronicle state bureau reporter Taylor Goldenstein joins the Standard with more.

Rio Grande Valley faces unprecedented water crisis as drought intensifies

Fresh water is about as scarce as it’s ever been in the Rio Grande Valley, with water levels in the Rio Grande and its reservoirs nearing historic lows.

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The RGV has certainly faced droughts before, but this one has taken on a more dire feel. University of Texas-Rio Grande Valley associate professor Jude Benavides joins the Standard with more.

Texas teen Sam Watson sets speed climbing records ahead of Paris Olympics

Speed climbing was introduced to the Olympics at the 2020 Summer Games in Tokyo and consists of two competitors racing up identical 15-meter walls.

The fastest climbers can do it in under five seconds – including Sam Watson, an 18-year-old from Southlake who holds the three fastest times ever in speed climbing. Ahead of his 2024 appearance in Paris, Watson joins the Standard today.

San Antonio’s Rivercenter to get culinary makeover celebrating local and Mexican flavors

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From tequila to tortillas, a new concept coming to downtown San Antonio will revitalize the food court of the iconic Shops at the Rivercenter to honor the culinary history and culture of the city and Mexico.

Texas Public Radio’s Marian Navarro spoke with the San Antonio chef who is leading the new multi-concept shopping experience coming to the mall next year.

Her brother passed away on death row, but Delia Perez Meyer’s continuing her fight against the death penalty

Delia Perez Meyer’s brother Louis Castro Perez was sentenced to death in 1999 for the brutal murders of two women and one girl. He maintained his innocence and died in May on death row.

Although her brother is gone, Delia continues to fight for his exoneration and the end of the death penalty.

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Legal battle intensifies over Blaine Milam’s death row case due to intellectual disability claims

Blaine Milam is on Texas’ death row for the 2008 beating death of 13-month-old Amora Carson. His execution, set for 2021, was stayed by a Texas appeals court due to claims of “significant limitations in intellectual functioning.” The U.S. Supreme Court barred executions of individuals with intellectual disabilities in 2002 but allowed states some discretion.

Last week, The Arc of the United States and other groups filed an amicus brief with the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals. Arc legal director Shira Wakschlag joins the Standard with the latest developments.

All this, plus the Texas Newsroom’s state roundup and Wells Dunbar with the Talk of Texas.

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North Texas skies clear up after a foggy morning

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North Texas skies clear up after a foggy morning


North Texas skies clear up after a foggy morning – CBS Texas

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Patchy fog Wednesday morning will give way to mostly sunny skies as the day goes on.

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