Connect with us

New Jersey

Homelessness in N.J. is compounded by extreme heat. Advocates are pushing for more cooling centers

Published

on

Homelessness in N.J. is compounded by extreme heat. Advocates are pushing for more cooling centers


From Camden and Cherry Hill to Trenton and the Jersey Shore, what about life in New Jersey do you want WHYY News to cover? Let us know.

Gabrielle, who struggles with mental health and addiction problems, has been living on the streets of Trenton for the past five years.

“People look right through you like you’re not real, you’re not worthy of just human decency,” she said.

She said she is in survival mode every day, thinking about where her next meal would come from or how she can keep herself safe. On top of all that, she now has to deal with the extreme heat.

Advertisement

“You’re just walking in circles, like where do I go next, you know what I mean, and wanting to just lay down, sit down, be comfortable,” she said. “It’s mind-blowing that some people may have $4 billion, and I might have $2.”

So far this year, there have been 14 days when the temperature reached at least 90 degrees in Mercer County.

Shel Winkley, a meteorologist with Climate Central, Inc., a nonprofit organization in Princeton that analyzes climate data, said the extremely high temperatures arrived earlier this summer compared to past years. A study by the organization found that New Jersey is tied in third place with Masschussetts and New Mexico as the fastest-warming states in the country. “When it’s hot at night, if you don’t have air conditioning and you don’t have a chance for your body to recuperate from the day’s heat and get ready for the next day of heat, that’s where the health risks are an issue,” Winkley said.

That makes people who live on the streets particularly vulnerable.

New Jersey’s homeless population has risen 17% over the past few years. According to the latest Point-In-Time Count of the Homeless coordinated by Monarch Housing Associates, there were 10,267 people without a home in 2023.

Advertisement

Connie Mercer, the CEO of the NJ Coalition to End Homelessness, said the official total does not include people who are “couch surfers,” who move from friend to friend on a continual basis, many times with their children. She said not being able to escape the heat is dreadful.

“Dying from heat is a horrible way to die, horrible, awful with your muscles contracting, with your losing your ability to think,” she said.

Mercer said that housing is so expensive in New Jersey that most people are priced out.

“More and more, the homeless we’re seeing are people who always worked, who always paid their bills, who are good citizens, and then rents went up and up and up, and they just can’t make it anymore,” she said.

While the unhoused population is increasing, the resources available to them are still scant, Mercer said.

Advertisement

She said some Jersey towns spend more money on homeless dogs and cats than homeless people.

“There just has not been the kind of commitment to taking care of the homeless in this state that there has been in other states,” said Mercer.

She said she is concerned about the recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling that could allow municipalities to ticket homeless people for sleeping outside.

The State Senate Health, Human Services and Senior Citizens Committee approved a measure to create a Code Red alert program to shelter at-risk individuals during extreme heat and bad air quality events. The bill is under review by the Budget and Appropriations Committee.



Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

New Jersey

Second day of early voting in NJ-10 special primary election – New Jersey Globe

Published

on

Second day of early voting in NJ-10 special primary election – New Jersey Globe


Good morning, New Jersey.

The second of there days of in-person early voting begins today in a special primary election for the U.S. House of Representatives in New Jersey’s 10th district where eleven Democrats and one Republican are vying for the chance to fill the unexpired term of Rep. Donald Payne, Jr. (D-Newark), who died on April 24.

Early voting centers will be open from 10 AM to 8 PM and on Sunday from 10 AM to 6 PM.

Essex County will have seven early voting locations: East Orange, Irvington, Verona, West Orange, and three in Newark.

Advertisement

There are five early voting locations in Union County: Cranford, Roselle, Roselle Park, and two in Union; there are none in Linden, where Mayor Derek Armstead is seeking the Democratic nomination.   In Hudson County, Jersey City have three early voting locations.

Click HERE to view the list of early voting locations.

As long as voters are in line by the close of early voting each day, they may vote regardless of how long the lines are.  Voters should never be asked to leave and come back the next day.

In New Jersey, you may only vote in the primary of your party affiliation; the deadline to switch parties has passed. However, unaffiliated voters may declare an affiliation at the polls and vote in either the Democratic or Republican primaries.

First-time voters who registered by mail might need to provide identification at the polls.

Advertisement

Anyone who has already received a vote-by-mail ballot may not vote by machine but can seek a replacement mail-in ballot from their county clerk or request a provisional ballot on Election Day.

Considering the closeness of Election Day, voters should cast vote-by-mail-in ballots, skipping the U.S. Postal Service and using secure ballot drop boxes in the county where they reside.

Essex County has secure ballot drop box locations in Caldwell, East Orange, Essex Fells, Irvington, Orange, and Verona, along with two each in Montclair and West Orange and four in Newark.  In Union County, secure ballot drop box locations are in Elizabeth, Garwood, Hillside, Kenilworth, Linde, Roselle, Roselle Park, and Westfield, as well as two in Cranford and two in Union.  There are five in Jersey City.

Click HERE to view the list of secure ballot drop box locations.

Superior Court judges across the state will be available through Sunday to conduct remote hearings if New Jerseyans believe they were improperly rejected from early voting.

Advertisement

Voters should not leave their polling location just because an election worker says they don’t appear on their rolls.  Instead, they should contact election officials to determine their registration status.   A provisional ballot can be requested on Election Day,  but that won’t fix the problem; if a name does not show up on the voter list, and the issue is not addressed, election officials will likely reject the ballot.

Instead, voters who believe a mistake was made can request to appear before a judge.  This can be done remotely by video or telephone; it’s not necessary to go to the courthouse, although that is an option.

Election officials will arrange for a judge to hear election-related issues on the same day.

The state’s Voter Protection Initiative will watch for voting rights and civil rights violations during early voting and on Election Day.  The Office of Public Integrity and Accountability will monitor allegations of voter intimidation, election fraud and interference, illegal electioneering, and other criminal violations.

The OPIA has spent more than four years pursuing election fraud charges filed against Paterson Councilmen Alex Mendez and Michael Jackson; the two were re-elected earlier in May while under indictment and awaiting trial.  An investigation into racist flyers in the 2017 elections in Edison and Hoboken has turned into cold cases that the OPIA has been unable to crack.

Advertisement

New Jersey’s Voter Information and Assistance Hotline can be reached at 1-877-NJVOTER (1-877-658-6837).

The American Civil Liberties Union Hotline can be reached at 866-OUR-VOTE (866-687-8683).

Click HERE to check your voter registration.

Click HERE to Track Your Ballot.

Advertisement



Source link

Continue Reading

New Jersey

Stop & Shop to Close 32 Stores, Including 10 in New Jersey – Here's Where

Published

on

Stop & Shop to Close 32 Stores, Including 10 in New Jersey – Here's Where


Bad news if you’re a Stop & Shop lover.

Grocery retailer, Stop & Shop has announced they are closing 32 locations in the tri-state area, including 10 of them in New Jersey.

Why is Stop & Shop closing locations?

The company is moving forward with growth restructuring to improve the customer experience, so they’re closing down under-performing locations. The good news is, employees at the impacted locations will be offered opportunities within the company.

Stop & Shop President Gordon Reid said:

Advertisement

“Stop & Shop is focused on growing through large, multi-year price investments and a stronger customer value proposition, both in-store and online. This means we’ll be focused on delivering lower everyday prices, as well as even more savings for our customers through strong promotions.”

When will Stop & Shop locations close?

The company hasn’t specified closing dates for each of their locations, but they’ll communicate specific dates to locals and associates well ahead of time. So keep an eye on your local Stop & Shop’s updates.

All locations will be closed by Nov 2, 2024.

READ MORE: New Jersey’s Favorite Grocery Store Will Not Surprise You

Advertisement

Get ready to say goodbye to some of the stores! Here’s where they’re closing in New Jersey:

1083 Inman Ave., Edison

1049 US Highway 1 South, Edison

4861 US Highway 9, Howell

1278 US Highway 22, Phillipsburg

Advertisement

581 Stelton Road, Piscataway

625 Paterson Ave., Carlstadt

1221 State Route 27, Franklin Township

130 Skyline Drive, Ringwood

505 Richmond Ave, Point Pleasant Beach

Advertisement

2275 West County Line Road, Jackson

Stop & Shop still has over 350 locations across 5 states. After this round of closures, 47 will still be open in New Jersey. 

Here Are the 15 Remaining TGI Fridays in New Jersey

We’ll keep this list updated if anything changes!

Gallery Credit: Austyn

Uncle June’s House From ‘The Sopranos’ is On Sale in Newark NJ- Take a Look Inside!

This house always had the makings of an historic New Jersey landmark. It’s been a while since we’ve seen this house. Here’s how it looks now!

Advertisement

Gallery Credit: Austyn





Source link

Continue Reading

New Jersey

18-year-old N.J. man accused in plot to destroy PSE&G substations

Published

on

18-year-old N.J. man accused in plot to destroy PSE&G substations


18-year-old New Jersey man accused in plot to destroy PSE&G substations

Advertisement


18-year-old New Jersey man accused in plot to destroy PSE&G substations

00:42

Advertisement

NEWARK, N.J. — An 18-year-old New Jersey man is accused in a plot to destroy PSE&G substations.

Authorities said Andrew Takhistov, of East Brunswick, began communicating with an undercover law enforcement employee on a social messaging platform in January.

Takhistov allegedly had previously requested advice about weapons and disseminated manuals on how to construct homemade weapons on the messaging platform. Investigators said the suspect also encouraged violence against various ethnic and religious communities.

According to investigators, Takhistov communicated with the undercover employee over the course of several months, discussing infrastructure sabotage.

Authorities said Takhistov took the undercover employee to two electrical substations in North Brunswick and New Brunswick on two separate occasions in June and July, discussed how to conduct an attack on an electrical substation and asked the undercover employee to take photos of the substations so Takhistov could send them to a Russian friend for additional advice on how to sabotage the stations.

Advertisement

Federal prosecutors said Takhistov was arrested Wednesday at Newark Liberty International Airport as he was allegedly on his way to Ukraine to join the Russian Volunteer Corps.

“We allege Takhistov, who is only 18 years old, planned to travel overseas so he could learn lessons from Russians fighting in Ukraine on how to destroy power grids and other critical infrastructure. His alleged conversations and planned actions are chilling and were inspired by racially motivated violent extremism,” FBI – Newark Special Agent in Charge James E. Dennehy said in a statement.  

Takhistov has been charged with soliciting another individual to engage in criminal conduct. He appeared in court Friday and was detained. If found guilty, he faces a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison and a $125,000 fine.

Advertisement



Source link

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending