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As Primary Looms, Haley Challenges Trump in Her Home of South Carolina

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As Primary Looms, Haley Challenges Trump in Her Home of South Carolina


With two weeks to go before the South Carolina Republican primary, Nikki Haley is trying to challenge Donald Trump on her home turf while the former president tries to quash his last major rival’s narrow path to the nomination.

Trump, turning his campaign focus to the southern state days after an easy victory in Nevada, is expected to rev up his supporters at a Saturday afternoon rally in Conway, near Myrtle Beach.

On his way in, Trump stopped and briefly spoke to an overflow crowd gathered outside and thanked South Carolina Governor Henry McMaster, who endorsed him early. McMaster became governor in 2017 when Trump appointed Haley to be his ambassador to the United Nations.

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“It was more important to get Henry McMaster to be governor than it was to have her in the United Nations,” Trump said, referring to Haley without mentioning her name. “And he did a much better job.”

Trump, who has long been the front-runner in the GOP presidential race, won three states in a row and is looking to use South Carolina’s February 24 primary to close out Haley’s chances and turn his focus fully on an expected rematch with Democratic President Joe Biden in the general election.

Haley skipped the Nevada caucuses, condemning the contest as rigged for Trump, and she has instead focused on South Carolina, kicking off a two-week bus tour across the state where she served as governor from 2011 to 2017.

‘They’re grumpy old men!’

Speaking to about a couple hundred people gathered outside a historic opera house in Newberry, Haley on Saturday portrayed Trump as an erratic and self-absorbed figure not focused on the American people.

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She pointed to the way he flexed his influence over the Republican Party this past week, successfully pressuring GOP lawmakers in Washington to reject a bipartisan border security deal and publicly pressed Republican National Committee Chair Ronna McDaniel to consider leaving her job.

“What is happening?” Haley said. “On that day of all those losses, he had his fingerprints all over it,” she added.

Haley reprised her questions of Trump’s mental fitness, an attack she has sharpened since a January 19 speech in which he repeatedly confused her with former House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. Haley, 52, has called throughout her campaign for mental competency tests for politicians, a way to contrast with 77-year-old Trump and 81-year-old Biden.

“Why do we have to have someone in their 80s run for office?” she asked. “Why can’t they let go of their power?”

A person in the crowd shouted out: “Because they’re grumpy old men!”

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“They are grumpy old men,” Haley said.

Republican presidential candidate and former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley speaks during a campaign visit in Newberry, South Carolina, Feb.10, 2024.

Haley continued the argument when speaking to reporters afterward, citing a report released Thursday by the special counsel investigating Biden’s possession of classified documents. The report described Biden’s memory as “poor.”

“American can do better than two 80-year-olds for president,” Haley said.

Harlie O’Connell, a longtime South Carolina resident who backs Haley, said she is excited to vote in the presidential primary for a woman from her home state.

While O’Connell plans to support the eventual GOP nominee, she said she would prefer someone younger.

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“It’s just time for some fresh blood,” O’Connell said.

Her husband, Mike O’Connell, credited Haley for bringing major manufacturers such as Volvo and Samsung to the state while she was governor, bringing jobs and investment. He drew a contrast between the candidates’ approach to foreign policy and said he wants the U.S. to continue assisting Ukraine in its war with Russia, as Haley has pledged.

“We need to encourage friendships and not discourage them,” he said of international relations.

Bob Pollard, a retired firefighter, said Haley showed “level-headedness” that Trump lacks in the way she responded to the 2015 shooting at a Charleston church in which a white supremacist killed nine Black members of the congregation.

Pollard said he cannot support Trump because “he’s a maniac,” adding that Trump’s campaign, in which he speaks frequently of “retribution” and his personal grievances, has “turned into a personal vendetta.”

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Trump ‘here to help us’

In Conway, people began lining up to see Trump hours before the doors opened to the arena where he was set to take the stage later.

Organizers expecting a capacity crowd set up screens outside where an overflow crowd would be able to watch Trump’s appearance.

The city sits along the Grand Strand, a broad expanse of South Carolina’s northern coast that is home to Myrtle Beach and Horry County, one of the most reliably conservative spots in the state and a central area of Trump’s base of support in the state in his past campaigns.

Tim Carter, from nearby Murrells Inlet, said he had backed Trump since 2016 and would do so again this year.

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“We’re here to stand for Trump, get our economy better, shut our border down, more jobs for our people,” said Carter, a pastor and military veteran who runs an addiction recovery ministry.

Cheryl Savage from Conway, who was waiting on the bleachers to hear from Trump, said the former president is “here to help us.” Savage said she backed Haley during her first run for governor in 2010 but now feels she is hurting herself by staying in the race.

“He deserves a second term,” Savage said, of Trump. “He did a fantastic job for four years.”



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Sumler puts up 19, Charleston Southern takes down South Carolina Upstate 63-60

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Sumler puts up 19, Charleston Southern takes down South Carolina Upstate 63-60


SPARTANBURG, S.C. (AP) – A’lahn Sumler scored 19 points to help Charleston Southern defeat South Carolina Upstate 63-60 on Wednesday night.

Nick Alves made two free throws with 3:04 remaining in the second half for a six-point lead, but South Carolina Upstate did not score again. The final field goal for the Spartans came with 4:24 left.

Sumler added eight rebounds for the Buccaneers (9-17, 5-8 Big South Conference). RJ Johnson shot 5 for 14 (1 for 3 from 3-point range) and 8 of 8 from the free throw line to add 19 points. RJ Duhart had nine points and finished 4 of 5 from the field.

The Spartans (9-18, 4-10) were led in scoring by Justin Bailey, who finished with 17 points and four steals. Jorge Ochoa added 11 points for South Carolina Upstate. Trae Broadnax also recorded 10 points, six rebounds and two steals.

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South Carolina 2024 NPR Tiny Desk submissions you need to watch

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South Carolina 2024 NPR Tiny Desk submissions you need to watch


South Carolina has historically been a hotbed for cultivating amazing musical talent, from James Brown Lee Brice, Dizzy Gillespie, Toro y Moi, and Darius Rucker just to name a few.

Several representatives of the Palmetto State have taken a chance to further cement their legacy by submitting their videos to the 2024 NPR Tiny Desk Competition. South Carolina Public Radio took the opportunity to speak with four artists who submitted their work.

AP & Soulful Touche’

Midlands

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AP & Soulful Touche’ are comprised of like-minded creative South Carolinian residents who came together in 2022 and decided multiple artistic brains are better than an individual one.

The group knows what a large platform that a Tiny Desk performance provides would do for their careers.

“It’s age-defying,” said AP. “We have fun because we love being able to perform because it furthers our goal of making this our long-term careers.”

“My eventual goal is to continue to perform live, while holding festivals, television program placements, film scores, and other things of that nature.”

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Jael B. Gadsden

Charleston

Motivated by the careers of Whitney Houston, Mariah Carey, and Yolanda Adams, Jael B. Gadsden creates R&B tunes that feel like Sunday morning service.

Gadsden knows that her winning the Tiny Desk competition would be huge for the state.

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“It would mean the world to me to represent S.C. in the Tiny Desk Contest because it’s where I was born and raised,” Gadsden said. “It would be my way of giving back to the community that has supported me and aided in my growth as an artist and a person. I would be truly honored and grateful.”

Gadsden explained Her Tiny Desk Submission, “You are a Winner,” is a way to create more positivity in the world and for people to hear her meaningful words and put them into action.

I want people to believe in themselves and never give up on your dreams, even if it means just taking one tiny step at a time. And If you are trying, you are already a winner!”

Mike Kaufman

Mt. Pleasant

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Kaufman grew up listening to Peter Seeger and the members of the “folk scare” – as well as acoustic pop folks like James Taylor, Livingston Taylor, and David Wilcox whose sounds helped inspire his musical career.

His Tiny Desk submission, “Song in a Dream,” was inspired by a dream he had.

“In my dream I heard YoYo Ma (one of my music heroes) playing a bassline on his cello that suggested the progression,” Kaufman said.

He says that South Carolina is filled with talented musicians, and although Kaufman knows it is a long shot for him to win the contest, he just wants to bring light to the South Carolina music scene.

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Kae Glass

Mt. Pleasant

Kae Glass has spent her entire life singing. She says she knows representation matters, so an opportunity to be showcased on Tiny Desk would help break the traditional standards of people who look like her.

“I don’t like stereotypes and you know, being Keisha, a big Black female, like a lot of stereotypes come with that and to be honest, my music goes way beyond just being a large Black female,” Glass said.

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Glass wants to bring back the essence of what good music from South Carolina which is why her music is unique.

“I’m not just some girl, I don’t have this specific message, it is different, I know it is,” she added.

The deadline for the 2024 Tiny Desk Contest is Thursday, Feb 21 at 11:59 p.m.

You can watch the full list of South Carolina submissions here.

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South Carolina's Darla Moore School Marks Half A Century Of Excellence In International Business

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South Carolina's Darla Moore School Marks Half A Century Of Excellence In International Business


The Darla Moore School of Business at the University of South Carolina celebrates its 50th anniversary in 2024. Applicants to the Moore School’s International MBA are celebrating, too, because to mark the occasion the school is offering major financial incentives.

“This year, we have instituted multiple scholarships that — for top candidates — award up to 100% of tuition,” says Abhijit Guha, academic director of MBA programs at the Darla Moore School. “Not only does this celebrate the 50th anniversary of the IMBA, but it also reflects our commitment to improving access to the IMBA.” 

Rohit Verma, dean of the Darla Moore School of Business: “Almost every week we welcome guests from around the world. These interactions enrich learning experiences for our students, providing them ongoing opportunities for experiential growth.”

Access to the Moore School’s IMBA — ranked No. 1 in international business by U.S. News for 10 straight years, and in the nation’s top three for more than three decades — has launched the careers of countless executives at major companies like Accenture, Walmart, Allegiant Airlines, Johnson & Johnson, and many others since the school’s founding in 1974. “Our top programs have continued to thrive over the past 50 years and have built on its earlier success with a continually growing list of global partners and graduates who work on multiple continents,” says Rohit Verma, dean of the Moore School. 

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How has the International MBA been so consistently successful? From the start, the school has been ahead of the curve.

“Our faculty members foresaw the business world’s trajectory 50 years ago, anticipating the rise of multinational corporations and interconnected supply chains,” says Verma. 

Verma also credits an inclusive approach and welcoming spirit toward students from diverse backgrounds. The Moore School’s commitment to diversity of experience is evident from the moment one sets foot on campus to be greeted by 80 flags proudly representing the backgrounds of students and faculty.

Verma commends the school’s more than 180 top-notch faculty, saying the program wouldn’t be as successful as it is today without them. He also credits the school’s talented students and alumni — many of whom, he notes, are making waves in the business world. 

A WINNING RECIPE

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Marc van Essen, associate dean of international programs and partnerships

The Moore School’s IMBA program has been ranked No. 1 for 10 consecutive years and has been in the top 3 for 34 consecutive years — ever since U.S. News & World Report released their first IMBA rankings.

Verma says part of the school’s winning recipe is a multidisciplinary approach to learning.

“Our curriculum also builds on the interdependence of international business with finance, supply chain management, marketing and human resources,” he says. “We build on the strength of our school, and international business is our longstanding strength — along with a few others like global supply chain and a very strong program in human resources.” 

Over 50 years, partnerships and relationships have become a key ingredient in the recipe for success in strengthening the international connections at Darla Moore. 

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“An invaluable indirect advantage lies in the diverse array of visitors we receive, fostering global connections,” says Verma, who recently returned from a trip to visit partner schools in Asia. “Almost every week we welcome guests from around the world. These interactions enrich learning experiences for our students, providing them ongoing opportunities for experiential growth.”

MOORE CONNECTIONS IN COLUMBIA

Abhijit Guha, Moore School academic director of MBA programs

At Darla Moore, research centers are an active ingredient in their success.

“We have 12 active research centers, and they work with both local and international companies on educational and scholarly projects,” Verma says. In Columbia, South Carolina, where the school is located, many avenues for growth surround the school, particularly in the service and manufacturing sectors. The Moore School is mixing in new programs to build and enhance these strengths.

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“This area is a hub for multinational companies — importers of many businesses, lots of economic prosperity,” says Satish Jayachandran, associate dean of graduate programs. 

“BMW has made South Carolina home, Volvo Motors also, Boeing, Michelin, the Samsung production hub. Students are getting opportunities to interact and connect with them. A lot of people settle on the eastern coast, the western area has beautiful mountains. We build on this, we have academic strength and area strength.”

Another highlight of the program is the opportunity to fully immerse in another culture. “Our students have the option of learning multiple languages and going abroad to a country,” Jayachandran says. “This opportunity gives them an insight to the culture and the language — a distinct part of the program.”

Jayachandran commends highly successful alumni like Sali Christeson, founder of clothing company Argent, and Wendy Thomas, CEO at SecureWorks, a cybersecurity firm.

MOORE TO EXPLORE GLOBALLY

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Satish Jayachandran, associate dean of graduate programs

“Over time, the Sonoco International Business Department at the Moore School has developed into a hub of world-class, multi-disciplinary knowledge,” says Marc van Essen, associate dean of international business and one of three professors — along with João Albino-Pimentel and Beth L. Renninger — named to Poets&Quants‘ 50 Best Undergraduate Business Professors Of 2023. 

Van Essen teaches Comparative Corporate Governance for IMBA students. “I enjoy challenging students, especially their assumptions, to help them better understand how to manage a multinational company, deal with different stakeholders and how this differs globally depending on the context,” he says. “It is a privilege to observe students develop into intellectuals who can think critically, reason and understand complex ideas while studying at the Moore School.” 

Another successful aspect of international business at Darla Moore is their Cohort IB program, where students can study at multiple top schools. While abroad, they’ll learn the ins and outs of international business at one of the school’s 80 plus partner schools and gain global insights, language skills, and a professional network. 

“We aren’t just preparing students for their first job after the IMBA; we’re preparing them for an overall successful career,” says van Essen. 

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“The global classrooms and IMBA immersions provide interactions with a variety of companies, industries and people that broaden your horizon and introduce you to a different way of thinking. These immersions are a great way to really experience and understand the people, their traditions and their culture. Even if you plan to be employed in the U.S., the foreign experience gained by study abroad is deeply valued by companies,” he says.

Darla Moore partners with some of the top schools around the world, learning about pressing topics such as sustainability, corruption, inequality, corporate governance issues in a global context. 

“We are preparing them for global disruption and teaching them how to lead effectively through it,” states van Essen. 

With a legacy of producing accomplished graduates and fostering international success, Darla Moore continues to lead in providing world-class education and preparing future global business leaders.

Darla Moore IMBA students

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