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Father’s Day, new redfish regulations coming soon

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Father’s Day, new redfish regulations coming soon


So, you have a few days between now and Father’s Day — it’s next Sunday — to think of that can’t-miss gift.

If Dad is a fisherman, make that a coastal fisherman, then you might consider a Golden Rule.

Not the “Do unto others…” Golden Rule, but a golden measuring stick. He’s going to need it with the second of the new regulations coming a few days after Father’s Day.

Yep, come June 20, the new regulations will be in force for redfish.

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Like these:

• A new minimum size of 18 inches with a maximum size limit of 27 inches total length;

• A daily creel limit of four redfish;

• A prohibition of keeping redfish measuring longer than 27 inches;

• And, charter skippers and their crew(s) will not be able to keep a redfish while on a paid trip.

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The new limits reduces the daily per-person limit by one redfish, and eliminates the possibility of keeping one redfish longer than 27 inches.

It’s also advisable to check out how to measure a fish in the state Wildlife and Fisheries 2024 Fishing Regulations pamphlet. This regulation has been around for years and mandates the angler must make the fish “a long as possible,” meaning you can’t “fan the tail” to make any fish fall under the maximum length limit.

If you want to jazz up this new measuring stick, then take a red permanent marker and draw a line at 18 inches and at 27 inches.

While you’re at it, take a black permanent marker and draw a line at 13 inches and another at 20 inches to account for the new length limits on speckled trout.

There are so many other choices, but it’s always good to know exactly what Dad wants for tackle or other fishing options. Same’s true for hunters.

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Gift cards work well, too.

At Grand Isle

If there was one extraordinary truth coming from last weekend’s Catholic High Alumni Rodeo, it’s that keeper-size speckled trout around Grand Isle and The Fourchon want live croakers. That’s what all the bigger trout ate.

Live shrimp worked, too, but took a lot of smaller trout and the ever-present hardhead catfish.

We fished with artificial bait for two mornings both under a cork and tight-lined and caught small trout.

Another oddity was all the flounder entered in the rodeo. Fisheries biologists know cold winters produce more flounder, and maybe that was the case, but constant 12-15 knot winds kept a lot of rodeo anglers inside and fishing around rock piles and jetties, places where flounder like to live.

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No wake zone

Heavy rains in the Verret Basin forced the St. Mary Parish Sheriff’s Office to declare a no-wake zone in the Stephensville-Belle River area “until further notice.”

The area includes portions of Grassy Lake and Lake Palourde in St. Martin Parish.

Project Appleseed

A national movement to make youngsters better aware of firearms and become better shooters produced the name Project Appleseed, and it’s coming to Palo Alto Rifle and Pistol Club located just northwest of Donaldsonville the weekend of June 29-30.

The Louisiana Sheriffs’ Association is sponsoring the event for youngsters 17 and younger.

LSA spokesman Tony Geeck described PA as “…excellent program, you will be a better rifleman after attending.”

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You can call Geeck at (985) 707-3443 to check out the availability of rifles, the limited quantity of ammunition and to answer any other questions.

A new chief

Wildlife and Fisheries secretary Madison Sheahan selected Stephen Clark to be the next head of the agency’s Enforcement Division with the title of “superintendent.”

Clark began his law enforcement career with the department in 1994 before moving to the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service where he became an assistant special agent and a resident agent in charge, and special agent.

He has served as advisor since Sheahan was named to head the agency five months ago.

Red snapper

Through May 19, some 35 days after opening the season, Wildlife and Fisheries’ managers and biologists estimated the red snapper catch at 241,406 pounds. That’s 25.8% of our state’s annual allotment of 934,587 pounds.

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The near real-time data is a product of the agency’s highly regarded LA Creel program.

And, through the first weeks, the agency continues to advise offshore anglers of the need to have a no-fee Recreational Offshore Landing Permit, which is available only from the agency’s website: wlf.louisiana.gov.

Offshore reef fishermen are required to have the ROLP to take a number of reef species, including snappers, cobia and groupers, and bluewater species, including tuna, wahoo, dolphinfish and billfish.



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Louisiana

Video Shows Truck Engulfed in Flames at Popular I-10 Travel Center in Louisiana

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Video Shows Truck Engulfed in Flames at Popular I-10 Travel Center in Louisiana


A dramatic incident unfolded at a popular travel center off I-10 in Duson, Louisiana, on Sunday (June 23) when a truck caught fire. Numerous photos and a wild video surfaced online, showing the vehicle completely engulfed in flames.

The fire occurred at the I-10 Travel Center Chevron near Miss Mamie’s Casino, a well-known stop for travelers along I-10. According to a Facebook post from the Duson Fire Department, the blaze was reported at 10:52 AM. Firefighters arrived swiftly at 10:54 AM to find a 2016 Ford F-150 pickup truck fully engulfed in flames.

The truck was parked under a metal covering near the fuel pumps, causing heat and smoke damage to the structure. Despite the dangerous proximity to the fuel pumps, the firefighters successfully extinguished the fire with assistance from the Lafayette Fire Hazardous Materials unit, preventing what could have easily been a catastrophic explosion.

Duson Fire Chief Coby Duhon praised his team’s quick response and effective actions, saying, “With the proper personnel and response time, only a vehicle was lost today. No injuries were recorded, and there was minimal structure damage.”

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A video from Jamie Stutes Fontenot on Facebook showed just how dramatic the blaze was.

The cause of the fire is currently under investigation. Chief Duhon also thanked the Scott and Mire Fire Departments for their assistance in managing the situation.

We will update this story if any more new developments are confirmed.

LOOK: The most expensive weather and climate disasters in recent decades

Stacker ranked the most expensive climate disasters by the billions since 1980 by the total cost of all damages, adjusted for inflation, based on 2021 data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The list starts with Hurricane Sally, which caused $7.3 billion in damages in 2020, and ends with a devastating 2005 hurricane that caused $170 billion in damage and killed at least 1,833 people. Keep reading to discover the 50 of the most expensive climate disasters in recent decades in the U.S.

Gallery Credit: KATELYN LEBOFF





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Former OSU Wreslter Inducted Into Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame

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Former OSU Wreslter Inducted Into Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame


One of Oklahoma State’s most memorable wrestlers was honored by his home state over the weekend.

On Saturday, former OSU wrestler Daniel Cormier was inducted into the Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame. Originally from Lafayette, Louisiana, Cormier was a dominant wrestler in high school.

At Northside High School, Cormier won three state wrestling championships. After his success in high school, he attended Colby Community College in Kansas.
He also dominated there, winning two NJCAA national championships while going 61-0 in two years. Following his undefeated career at Colby Community College, Cormier made his way to Stillwater, where he would be a force for the Cowboys.

READ MORE: Analyzing Oklahoma State’s Toughest Opponents in the New-Look Big 12

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At OSU, Cormier went 52-10 across the 2000 and 2001 seasons. With 36 bonus-point wins, Cormier was good enough to qualify for the NCAA Championships in both years.

In 2001, he earned All-America honors for his performance as he finished national runner-up at 184 pounds. In both seasons, Cormier played a significant role in OSU winning Big 12 championships.

After wrestling for two years under John Smith, Cormier went into freestyle wrestling and represented the United States on a few occasions. Cormier won gold medals at the Pan American Championships in 2002 and the Pan American Games in 2003.

Following his wrestling career, Cormier took up mixed martial arts and eventually joined the UFC in 2013.  Cormier would end his MMA career with 22 wins in 26 fights. He now works with ESPN as part of its mixed martial arts coverage.

As Cormier is in another Hall of Fame, he recognized the importance of his home state in his career.

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Boy, it’s good to be a kid from Louisiana,” Cormier said.

READ MORE: Why Oklahoma State’s Defensive Line will Outperform Expectations in 2024

Want to join the discussion? Like AllPokes on Facebook and follow us on Twitter to stay up to date on all the latest Cowboys news. You can also meet the team behind the coverage.





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Louisiana’s bookstores are vital community hubs

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Louisiana’s bookstores are vital community hubs


Louisiana got some positive media coverage in The New York Times this month, scoring a nice publicity coup in part because of the lively bookstore scene in New Orleans. The Times article, written by Crescent City native Maurice Carlos Ruffin, was a timely reminder that in a region known for great food and music, bookstores are an important part of Louisiana’s civic life, too.

Ruffin, a novelist and professor of creative writing at LSU, wrote the June 5 Times story, “Read Your Way Through New Orleans.” He suggested books that help explain the local culture and pointed travelers to a few literary landmarks, including neighborhood bookstores. Among the New Orleans stores getting a shout-out were Baldwin & Co. near Jackson Square, along with Community Book Center and the recently renovated Octavia Books.

Ruffin’s story pointed to a reality worth keeping in mind as another summer reading season unfolds. Our local bookstores, whether they be in Lafayette, Baton Rouge, New Orleans, Shreveport or other communities around the state, are more than venues to buy books. They’re places where people from all walks of life can gather. In a divided world, these sources of connection are needed more than ever.

That thought’s been very much with me these days as I join many others in mourning the recent death of longtime Baton Rouge bookseller Danny Plaisance. Plaisance, who died June 4, ran Cottonwood Books for many years until ill health forced him to close it in 2022.

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Cottonwood’s mix of new and old books was a perfect classroom for me after I took my first newspaper job in Baton Rouge in 1986, becoming a store regular. The eclectic selection nudged me to explore cheap editions of the classics when I stopped by to catch up on just-published titles. Plaisance’s store was a draw for out-of-towners, too. Actor Tom Hanks combed the shelves a few years ago when he was in Louisiana to film a movie. It’s easy to see why Hanks, a history buff, would have been charmed. With its wealth of vintage volumes, Cottonwood smelled of must and dust, old paper and glue, a scent that seemed like inhaling the past.

While dealers in old books can be known as a crotchety bunch, there was nothing gruff about Danny. We were more likely to discuss family than reading when I saw him at his counter, underscoring Danny’s idea that books are a part of, not apart from, the rest of life.

Peering through Cottonwood’s vacant storefront some weeks ago, I was wistful when I spotted the empty shelves, but the quiet aisles seemed like the deeper absence. People, more than books, make a bookstore a community — a truth made clear when I joined other mourners at Danny’s bereavement service.

The family had printed prayer cards with a picture of Danny at his bookstore counter. I took one home, and I’m using it for a bookmark.

Email Danny Heitman at danny@dannyheitman.com.

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