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Why Ohio State Quarterback Will Howard Fits With Chip Kelly

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Why Ohio State Quarterback Will Howard Fits With Chip Kelly


With high expectations for the Ohio State Buckeyes this season, the offense will need be a key part of the team’s success this season.

Last year, the Buckeyes featured Kyle McCord at the helm, while head coach Ryan Day called the plays for the veteran quarterback. The duo of McCord and Day had some positive moments throughout the season, but their efforts were not enough to defeat the Michigan Wolverines.

The tides have dramatically changed this offseason in Columbus and Ohio State will now put the trust in former Kansas State quarterback Will Howard and newly-hired offensive coordinator Chip Kelly. Many fans are skeptical of how this dynamic will work, but the combination of Howard and Kelly could take this offense to new heights during the 2024 season.

Coach watches his quarterback throw in practice.

Mar 7, 2024; Columbus, OH, USA; Ohio State Buckeyes offensive coordinator Chip Kelly watches quarterback Will Howard (18) throw during spring football practice at the Woody Hayes Athletic Center. / Adam Cairns/Columbus Dispatch / USA

When looking at any former Chip Kelly teams, the biggest takeaway is Kelly’s usage of a duel-threat quarterback.

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Looking back at the 2022 season, UCLA quarterback Dorian Thompson-Robinson had an incredible jump in play. Part of it was due to his ability to run the ball. Thompson-Robinson finished his final year at UCLA with 117 carries and 646 yards on the ground on top of his 3,154 yards in the air.

This style of play is very similar to Howard’s play style at Kansas State. The 6-foot-5, 242-pound quarterback has demonstrated his capability to use his legs when called upon. In 2023, Howard reached 351 rushing yards on 81 carries. His run-style is similar to Buffalo Bills quarterback Josh Allen, as both are big players and use their strength to gain extra yards.

One of the main emphasises in Kelly’s offense last year was utilizing the middle of the field in the pass game. Taking a look at UCLA’s primary starting quarterback last year, Dante Moore, we can see how much the Buckeye’s new offensive coordinator likes to use the middle of the field (stats according to PFF):

Depth of Pass

Percentage of Passing Play Call

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Behind the line of scrimmage, middle

8.9%

Short, middle

18.7%

Intermediate, middle

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11.2%

TOTAL

38.8%

Out of the 12 spots that PFF uses to identify passing zones, three of the four zones across the middle made up nearly 40% of Moore’s passes.

The usage of the middle part of the field perfectly aligns with Howard’s skillset, as his profile last year shows how well he does in those passing concepts.

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Depth of Pass

Percentage of Passing Play Call

Completion Percentage

PFF Grade

Behind the line of scrimmage, middle

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8.1%

89.7%

68.5

Short, middle

31.3%

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75%

68.2

Intermediate, middle

12.0%

58.1%

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90.2

Kansas State did even more through the middle of the field than Kelly’s UCLA offense last year, which could be perfect for Howard. While the former Wildcats’ quarterback did not excel outside the numbers and on deeper throws, Howard did a solid job in the areas that are basic concepts of a Chip Kelly offense.

The final piece to why this combination will work is the fact that both Howard and Kelly will have an upgrade in offensive weapons.

As a starting quarterback for Kansas State, Howard had a 1,000 yard rusher in every season except one, but did not have a wide receiver reach over 800 yards. For Kelly, he had solid running backs with no talented pass catchers.

Now, as both join Ohio State, they have weapons in order to expand the playbook while elevating the play of Howard. The Buckeyes lost a few of the team’s key pieces in the running back room, but gained former Ole Miss running back Quinshon Judkins and held on to TreVeyon Henderson. The one-two punch of Judkins and Henderson will be one of the best, if not the best, running back room in college football.

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In terms of pass catchers, the Buckeyes return two wide receivers in Emeka Egbuka and Carnell Tate to command the wide receiver room. Newcomer Jeremiah Smith also has shown promise throughout the spring and could be a big piece to the core.



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3 arrested in death of Alexa Stakely, Ohio mom killed trying to save son in carjacking

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3 arrested in death of Alexa Stakely, Ohio mom killed trying to save son in carjacking


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COLUMBUS, Ohio — All three suspects wanted in connection with the death of Alexa Stakely, an Ohio mom struck while trying to prevent the theft of her vehicle with her 6-year-old son inside, have been taken into custody, authorities said Wednesday evening.

A 16-year-old male whom police say admitted he was driving Stakely’s vehicle turned himself in and is being charged with delinquency murder in Franklin County Juvenile court, Columbus police said. The second male, 17, was taken into custody Wednesday afternoon.

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The Columbus Dispatch, part of the USA TODAY Network, is not naming the two minors.

A third male, Gerald Dowling, 19, turned himself in Wednesday night, according to Columbus police. Authorities later confirmed that Dowling was charged with murder.

Police said the 17-year-old male admitted to detectives that he was present during the attempted theft of Stakely’s vehicle. Additional details regarding what he would be charged with were not immediately available Wednesday.

The 16-year-old, accompanied by his parents, surrendered himself at Columbus police headquarters and agreed to an interview with detectives, authorities said. The teen later told detectives that he and the two other acquaintances were looking for a vehicle to steal around 1:30 a.m. on July 11 when they came across Stakely’s Honda.

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What happened to Alexa Stakely?

Stakely, 29, a single mother who was a speech-language pathologist for Winchester Trail Elementary School in Canal Winchester, Ohio, also had a part-time job as a waitress to support her son. She was picking her son up after a waitressing shift.

Stakely brought the sleeping boy out to her Honda CRV, which she left running, while she met the babysitter in the doorway to get the boy’s belongings, police said.

As Stakely returned to her vehicle, she saw someone inside beginning to back out onto the road. Stakely ran out toward the Honda and was heard screaming for her child and telling the driver to stop, police said.

As his two friends watched, the 16-year-old told detectives he got into Stakely’s vehicle and was about to drive off when Stakely ran out to stop him. Police said the teen told detectives that he panicked and began driving off, striking Stakely with her vehicle.

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Police said the Honda hit Stakely and she was knocked to the pavement, suffering a “fatal wound” to her head. She was later pronounced dead at a hospital.

The 16-year-old abandoned the Honda within the same complex. Witnesses saw two males running north, past where Stakely was on the ground, jumping a fence and escaping into a neighboring apartment complex, police said. The three regrouped a short time later on foot, police said.

Stakely’s son was recovered uninjured and told police he slept through the attempted carjacking.

‘She was my best friend’

More than 100 people gathered near Winchester Trail Elementary School last week to pay tribute to the young single mother. Stakely’s friends and colleagues said she aspired to own a home and business. Those who knew her said she was loyal to her friends and family and loved her son “fiercely.

Stakely’s brother, Braedyn Price, also attended the vigil. Price, 21, said that he woke up at 4 a.m. on July 11 to a phone call saying that his sister, best friend, and mentor, Alexa, had been hit by a car. He said he initially didn’t believe it and then thought she had suffered some moderate injuries but that she’d recover.

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“And the next thing I knew, I was looking over her body,” Price said. “It’s still very hard for me to grasp.”

Price said that since his sister’s passing, he just feels “empty” and that he’s had trouble sleeping. He also said that he is angry at the people who are responsible for her death.

“She was an amazing human and my best friend,” Price said.

Violent carjackings in the U.S.

Carjackings have significantly increased in some U.S. cities since the COVID-19 pandemic, according to the Council on Criminal Justice. Carjackings surged by 93% in 10 cities from 2019 to 2023 and while the figure fell by 5% in 2023, data showed that the rate of carjackings was still high compared to years before 2020.

The rise in carjacking rates — along with other violent crimes — have prompted authorities, including in the nation’s capital, to provide more resources and crackdown on crime.

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Since 1992, federal, state, and local authorities have tried to toughen carjacking laws in response to spates of violent carjackings — including some incidents in which victims were murdered. One incident is credited to have prompted a federal response.

In September 1992, Pamela Basu, 34, was dragged to her death after two carjackers pushed her out of her vehicle while she was at a stop sign. Basu was driving her 2-year-old daughter to her first day of preschool.

During the incident, Basu’s arm got caught in a seatbelt and she was dragged for one and a half miles after she attempted to reach for her daughter in the back seat, according to The New York Times Archives. The two perpetrators were convicted of murder and other charges.

The murder of Basu shocked the country and outraged members of Congress, according to a North Carolina Central Law Review article. Congress quickly passed the Federal Anti-Car Theft Act of 1992 and former President George H. W. Bush signed it into law in October 1992.

Contact Shahid Meighan at smeighan@dispatch.com or on X @ShahidMeighan

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Ohio Lottery Mega Millions, Pick 3 Midday winning numbers for July 23, 2024

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Ohio Lottery Mega Millions, Pick 3 Midday winning numbers for July 23, 2024


The Ohio Lottery offers multiple draw games for those aiming to win big. Here’s a look at July 23, 2024, results for each game:

Mega Millions

Mega Millions drawings take place every week on Tuesday and Friday at 11 p.m.

03-09-14-26-51, Mega Ball: 21, Megaplier: 4

Check Mega Millions payouts and previous drawings here.

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Pick 3

Drawings are held daily, seven days a week, at 12:29 p.m. and 7:29 p.m., except Saturday evening.

Midday: 2-5-7

Evening: 3-9-4

Check Pick 3 payouts and previous drawings here.

Pick 4

Drawings are held daily, seven days a week, at 12:29 p.m. and 7:29 p.m., except Saturday evening.

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Midday: 9-2-8-0

Evening: 8-2-4-9

Check Pick 4 payouts and previous drawings here.

Pick 5

Drawings are held daily, seven days a week, at 12:29 p.m. and 7:29 p.m., except Saturday evening.

Midday: 8-6-8-3-5

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Evening: 6-0-4-5-2

Check Pick 5 payouts and previous drawings here.

Rolling Cash 5

Drawings are held daily, seven days a week, at approximately 7:05 p.m.

17-20-22-23-29

Check Rolling Cash 5 payouts and previous drawings here.

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Lucky For Life

Drawings are held daily, seven days a week, at approximately 10:35 p.m.

01-04-15-25-31, Lucky Ball: 17

Feeling lucky? Explore the latest lottery news & results

Winning lottery numbers are sponsored by Jackpocket, the official digital lottery courier of the USA TODAY Network.

Where can you buy lottery tickets?

Tickets can be purchased in person at gas stations, convenience stores and grocery stores. Some airport terminals may also sell lottery tickets.

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You can also order tickets online through Jackpocket, the official digital lottery courier of the USA TODAY Network, in these U.S. states and territories: Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Idaho, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Puerto Rico, Texas, Washington, D.C., and West Virginia. The Jackpocket app allows you to pick your lottery game and numbers, place your order, see your ticket and collect your winnings all using your phone or home computer.

Jackpocket is the official digital lottery courier of the USA TODAY Network. Gannett may earn revenue for audience referrals to Jackpocket services. GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800- GAMBLER, Call 877-8-HOPENY/text HOPENY (467369) (NY). 18+ (19+ in NE, 21+ in AZ). Physically present where Jackpocket operates. Jackpocket is not affiliated with any State Lottery. Eligibility Restrictions apply. Void where prohibited. Terms: jackpocket.com/tos.

This results page was generated automatically using information from TinBu and a template written and reviewed by an Enquirer digital news director. You can send feedback using this form.



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Ohio GOP Lawmakers File Bills To Restrict And Regulate Intoxicating Hemp Products, Including Delta-8 THC

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Ohio GOP Lawmakers File Bills To Restrict And Regulate Intoxicating Hemp Products, Including Delta-8 THC


“I’m just asking the legislature to take action so we can get these products off the shelf.”

By Megan Henry, Ohio Capital Journal

As Ohioans wait to legally purchase recreational-use marijuana, Republican lawmakers in both chambers of the General Assembly are trying to regulate adult-use hemp products.

State Rep. Sara Carruthers (R-Hamilton) introduced House Bill 642 on Thursday which would require the Ohio Director of Agriculture to issue recommendations for adult-use hemp products.

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If the bill were to pass, the Director of Agriculture (who is currently Brian Baldridge) would conduct and issue a report to the General Assembly about the “sale and use of hemp products that could be used for intoxicating purposes.” The report would be in consultation with the Ohio Department of Public Safety.

The report could include:

  • A definition of adult-use hemp products that could include restrictions on the amount of THC allowed in adult-use hemp products based on serving size.
  • Where adult-use hemp products may be sold and how those products are stored.
  • Minimum age requirements to purchase adult-use hemp.
  • Penalties for selling adult-use hemp products to someone who is underage.
  • Testing standards and requirements for adult-use hemp products.
  • Advertising restrictions and labeling requirements for adult-use hemp products.
  • How to enforce these recommendations, which could be giving inspection authority to the Ohio Investigative Unit in the Department of Public Safety.

If the recommendations are adopted, they would be in effect for one year.

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine (R) called on lawmakers earlier this year to ban or regulate delta-8, which he called “intoxicating hemp.”

Delta-8 is made from hemp, so it is legal under the 2018 Farm Bill which says hemp can be grown legally if it contains less than 0.3 percent THC. Hemp and marijuana are both types of cannabis plants.

Delta-8 is 0.3 percent THC or less, meaning it is not currently regulated and there is no age requirement to buy it, so teenagers and children can purchase it. These products are sold in smoke shops and gas stations.

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At the time of DeWine’s January press conference, there had been at least 257 reports of delta-8 poisoning in Ohio over the last three years, according to the Ohio Poison Control Center.

“I cannot do anything without action by the state legislator,” DeWine said during his January press conference. “I’m just asking the legislature to take action so we can get these products off the shelf. In the meantime, I would ask the retail establishments that are out there…the responsible thing to do is to take it off the shelf. We do need action by the state legislature to make this illegal.”

Ohio Senate

Over in the Senate, Sens. Kirk Schuring (R-Canton) and Steve Huffman (R-Tipp City) introduced a bill at the end of May that would place restrictions on adult-use hemp products.

Senate Bill 278 would ban selling adult-use hemp products to people under 21. It would also require stores to keep adult-use hemp products behind the counter and ID customers who want to buy those products.

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Ohio lawmakers are currently on break and not expected to come back until after the November election.

Marijuana in Ohio

Even though recreational marijuana is legal in Ohio after the passage of Issue 2, there is still nowhere to legally purchase weed.

The Division of Cannabis Control has yet to issue certificates of operations to dispensaries which would allow them to start selling recreational marijuana.

More than 200 facilities have qualified for a provisional license, which is a placeholder while the provisional licensee works to meet the requirements to get a certificate of operation such as having an inspection and demonstrating that employees can tell the difference between medical and recreational sales.

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“Following successful completion of that process, Certificates of Operation will be issued based on roughly the order in which completed applications were received,” James Crawford, spokesperson for the Division of Cannabis Control, said in an email.

“Again, there have been no Certificates of Operation issued to dispensaries to begin selling non-medical cannabis at this point.”

Of the 216 facilities that have a provisional license as of Friday, 133 are dispensaries.

License applications must be approved or denied by September 7.

“There will be no one singular day when sales begin,” Crawford said. “We will start issuing licenses and it will be up to the retailer based on staffing, stock and other considerations as to which day they will begin sales.”

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Four cultivators and six processors have received certificates of operation.

“This is necessary because dispensaries are not able to sell non-medical product unless the cultivator, processor and lab that have touched that particular product have received their non-medical cannabis Certificate of Operation,” Crawford said in an email.

This story was first published by Ohio Capital Journal.

Strong Majority Of Marijuana Rescheduling Public Comments Support Even Broader Reform Than Biden’s Plan, Two Analyses Show

Photo courtesy of Pexels.

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