Connect with us

Missouri

Missouri Gov. Parson signs bills supporting veterans, military members

Published

on

Missouri Gov. Parson signs bills supporting veterans, military members


JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (Edited News Release/KY3) – Missouri Governor Mike Parson signed new bills on Thursday supporting veterans and military personnel.

Gov. Parson signed House Bill (HB) 1495 and Senate Bill (SB) 912. Together, the legislation provides additional support to Missouri veterans and military members and requires the Missouri Veterans Commission (MVC) to review current practices and recommend additional efforts to prevent veteran suicide.

Governor Parson signed five additional bills during the public signing ceremony: HB 2111, SB 1453, SB 1111, SB 802, and SB 1359.

HB 1495 – directs MVC to review current practices and recommend additional efforts to prevent veteran suicide.

Advertisement

SB 912 – provisions relating to military and veterans affairs.

  • Directs MVC to review current practices and recommend additional efforts to prevent veteran suicide.
  • This provision is identical to HB 1495. Allows active-duty military members and their spouses stationed in Missouri to serve as election judges.
  • Clarifies that signing bonuses are considered salary or compensation for military income tax deductions in Missouri.
  • Establishes a new medallion for the Missouri Veterans Program for every military operation during the Afghanistan War.
  • Authorizes certain tuition fee waivers and grants for Missouri National Guard members seeking an undergraduate degree.
  • Establishes the Missouri Veterans and Job Opportunity Grant Program.

“We are proud to be a leading state for veterans, military members, and their families where they can find professional success, affordability, welcoming communities, and, above all, support and respect for their service to our great nation,” Governor Parson said. “The legislation we are signing today continues our commitment to our nation’s heroes that Missouri will remain one of the best places for veterans and service members to live, work, and raise a family. A special thank you to Representative Dave Griffith and Senator Ben Brown for leading these important efforts to protect, honor, and support Missouri’s military members, both past and present.”

  • HB 2111 – relating to the powers of the State Auditor.
    In addition to existing authority, it allows the State Auditor to audit any political subdivision or government entity when the Auditor suspects improper government activity after an investigation or upon the request of a prosecuting attorney, circuit attorney, or law enforcement agency.
  • SB 1111 – relating to the regulation of child care.
    Establishes licensing, operating, and inspection requirements for Prescribed Pediatric Extended Care facilities.
    Exempts before and after school programs serving school-aged children from certain licensure requirements.
  • SB 802 – relating to business investment incentives.
    Establishes the Missouri Rural Access to Capital Act.
  • SB 1359 – financial institutions.
    Creates the Model Money Transmission Act and Missouri Family Trust Company Act.
    Removes the requirement for women to be screened first by a Missouri Breast and Cervical Cancer Treatment provider before receiving MO HealthNet coverage.
  • SB 1453 – designates the Dr. Dan Brown Memorial Highway in Phelps County.

For additional provisions and more information on the legislation signed into law, visit senate.mo.gov or house.mo.gov.

To report a correction or typo, please email digitalnews@ky3.com. Please include the article info in the subject line of the email.



Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Missouri

Mark Donovan says Chiefs have stadium options in both Missouri and Kansas

Published

on

Mark Donovan says Chiefs have stadium options in both Missouri and Kansas


When Kansas City Chiefs president Mark Donovan opened his annual pre-training camp press conference at Missouri Western State University on Friday morning, he was facing a press gaggle that wanted answers about what the team intends to do about its home field — and they wanted those answers right now.

But in multiple responses to similar questions, Donovan said that while the team hasn’t yet decided what it will do, they’re working on figuring that out. In the meantime, there’s one thing that everyone can count on.

“It’s important for everybody to understand,” said Donovan, “that we are playing Kansas City Chiefs football home games — if [they’re] not international games — at GEHA Field at Arrowhead Stadium through 2031. That is our plan; that is what we’re doing.”

After that, however, the picture gets much cloudier. After Kansas lawmakers passed their modified STAR bond proposal that would make it possible for the Chiefs (and possibly the Kansas City Royals) to build new stadiums on the other side of the state line, many fans (and media observers) concluded it was obvious the team would make that move — just because it would be easier to build a new, modern facility.

Advertisement

But Donovan isn’t convinced it’s that obvious.

”I don’t think there’s a simple path on either side,” he insisted. “There’s a lot of work to be done on Kansas to see what the reality of that is. We don’t take that for granted.

“It was amazing what Kansas did. It was good to see. We really appreciate the leadership [from] Ty Masterson, Dan Hawkins, the various people [and] the governor in putting that together. That’s the first step.

“[But] once you get through that, it gets really complicated in how you do that. For us, the good news is that it creates more options.”

Donovan acknowledged that the team is engaged in stadium discussions with Kansas officials. But the team isn’t yet giving up on staying home.

Advertisement

“We continue our discussions with the folks in Missouri,” he said. “Talking to various leaders, there seem to be other options that are coming up now on the Missouri side. So we appreciate that — and it’s consistent with our strategy: if [the April proposal didn’t work], which was our plan, then we’ve got to look at options. And now we’ll have a couple of options to look at.”

Donovan believes that any Missouri solution would eventually come to a public vote. But until that state’s primary elections happen in early August, it will be difficult for state (or county) officials to estimate 2025’s political landscape. That would significantly shape any proposal that would come to a vote in… say… November.

If there is another Missouri vote, Donovan says the proposal will only include the Chiefs — and voters will have a clearer picture of what is on the table.

“We have committed that if we go to a public vote, we’ll do it in a way which is much more ‘final’ before we get to the vote,” he promised. “We’ll have a lot of the facts. We’ll have a lot of the details determined before we go. I think it’s important to acknowledge that we’d have to have agreements on the county side — and have support, frankly, from the county.”

How soon will we know the team’s plans? That’s very hard to calculate.

Advertisement

“We have to have somewhere to play our games for the 2031 season,” explained Donovan. “In order to do that, you’ve got to back up from there. When do you start planning? When do you start building? How do you renovate — or build new? If you’re renovating it, how are you doing it over seasons while you’re still playing there? A lot of those factors play into that.

“That goes back to the option point. We need to have options, we need to have those options to a point of definition to be able to make a decision. So that’s the process we’re in right now.”

So when will that decision point be upon us?

“I think six months from today, we’re going to have a really good idea of where we are,” said Donovan. “We may not be done, but we need to have a really good idea.

”When you’re building a new stadium, there’s a lot more lead time than when you’re renovating. So that’s why that timeline is a little bit longer — and will push us a little bit faster to make a decision. That timeline kind of plays into the Missouri timeline as well. So if we’re on that timeline, we need to make a decision — so Missouri sort of needs to play to that timeline.”

Advertisement

Stay tuned.



Source link

Continue Reading

Missouri

Editorial: Lucas Kunce is our choice in Missouri’s Democratic primary for the U.S. Senate

Published

on

Editorial: Lucas Kunce is our choice in Missouri’s Democratic primary for the U.S. Senate


Two years ago, this Editorial Board strongly recommended that Missouri Democrats nominate centrist attorney and former U.S. Marine Lance Kunce to run against Republican Eric Schmitt for an open U.S. Senate seat. Instead, Democrats picked Trudy Busch Valentine, a brewery heiress whose standard-issue Democratic political persona might have stood a chance in California but never did here.

As a result, Missouri now has one of the most radically right-wing Senate delegations in America. With senior Republican Sen. Josh Hawley up for re-election this year, Democrats have a chance to make the smart choice this time and nominate Kunce to challenge him. We again endorse Kunce in the Aug. 6 Democratic Senate primary.

It’s exceedingly difficult for any Democrat to win statewide in Missouri these days, but if there’s any path at all, it’s with a candidate like Kunce.

Advertisement

People are also reading…

A 41-year-old Independence resident, Kunce’s personal story demolishes the stereotype of the latte-sipping, out-of-touch liberal Democrat: Raised in a struggling working-class family, he earned his way up to become a Yale grad with a Mizzou law degree and extensive military and foreign relations experience.

Advertisement

Kunce’s political positions are in line with the mainstream of his party. He is pro-choice to the reasonable degree that existed under Roe v. Wade. He favors red-flag laws and universal background checks to keep guns from those who shouldn’t have them. He supports universal health care.

But with his modest upbringing and centrist political bearings, he is also able to communicate to more conservative rural voters, potentially bridging political polarization to make the case that Democratic policies on issues like health care and taxes are far more helpful to them than the GOP’s plutocratic agenda.

“We’ve got to fundamentally change who has power in this country,” Kunce told us, referring to corporate PACs. Despite his refusal to take corporate donations, he has consistently outraised Hawley in the crucial money battle, while racking up endorsements from both pro-labor and pro-veterans organizations.

When all of that is taken into account, it’s clear that Kunce’s three Democratic primary rivals — state Sen. Karla May, community activist December Harmon and Mita Biswas — wouldn’t stand nearly the chance Kunce does of defeating Hawley in November.

With the presidency now likely to fall to Republican ex-President Donald Trump, it becomes even more urgent for Democrats to hold their Senate majority. And Hawley (who is running unopposed for the GOP nomination next month) adds to the reasons Missourians should help hold that line.

Advertisement

From his political and personal culpability for the events of Jan. 6, 2021, to his insincere populist showboating on the Senate floor, to his outrageous recent defense of Christian nationalism, Hawley has been a frequently embarrassing senator for Missouri — and not an especially effective one.

With recent polls showing Hawley with a single-digit lead over Kunce in a state Trump won by 16 points in 2020, Democrats may in fact have the opportunity for an upset here. They also have an opportunity to seat a senator the state could finally be proud of.

Stay tuned for other endorsements to be published periodically before the Aug. 6 primary election.

Advertisement



Source link

Continue Reading

Missouri

Missouri bill becoming law next month to take a bite out of crime – Missourinet

Published

on

Missouri bill becoming law next month to take a bite out of crime – Missourinet


A crime-fighting package is on deck to become Missouri law next month. Senate Bill 754 is sponsored by Sen. Tony Luetkemeyer, R-Parkville. It started off as legislation to honor a St. Joseph Police Department canine officer.

In 2021, a St. Joseph Police Department dog, named Max, put his life on the line to save his human partner. Officer Lucas Winder was Max’s partner. Max was killed in the line of duty while he and Winder were responding to a standoff. The suspect came out of the house and attempted to ambush the officers, but Max stepped in to stop them.

“I remember shortly after that happened, there was this huge outcry in the community in Saint Joe, of people who, you know, were upset, of course, about the killing of canine Max, but also the fact that the law really doesn’t adequately protect these police canines,” Luetkemeyer said. “They’re sent into dangerous situations to subdue and help apprehend a dangerous and armed individual, so their human partner doesn’t have to put their life on the line.”

Under current Missouri law, police dogs are considered property. Harming or killing a police dog in the line of duty is a misdemeanor, punishable by up to 15 days in jail and a fine of $700.

Advertisement

“Max’s Law” will increase the charge to a felony punishable by up to seven years in federal prison and a fine of $10,000.

“Missouri has one of the most lax laws when it comes to killing a law enforcement canine is treated as mere property damage, and in fact, it’s a more serious crime to break the window of a police car than it is to kill a law enforcement canine,” said Luektemeyer.

Another piece of the bill, called “Blair’s Law,” will create a criminal offense for firing gunshots in the air to celebrate that injure or kill someone.

Thirteen years ago, Blair Shanahan Lane was killed in Kansas City after a bullet hit the 11-year-old.

“What we found is, is that there’s a gap in the law because you weren’t intending to kill anybody, you can’t be charged with a homicide offense,” Luetkemeyer said. “And so, this is designed to give prosecutors and law enforcement more tools to hold these individuals accountable who engage in this very dangerous behavior.”

Advertisement

Blair’s mother, Michele Shanahan DeMoss, has been advocating for the bill’s passage for thirteen years.

“I mean, I just woke up like a weight is lifted, is the way I would describe it. My entire drive to Jefferson City, I feel like I was taking weights off of me. And to describe the weight size, those would be cinder block size, is the weights that, just slowly laying them aside,” she told Missourinet after the bill signing. “A bullet travels a long way,” she said. “It traveled three football fields and hit her in the neck. And it hit her so hard that it moved her.”

The bill is also sponsored by Rep. Mark Sharpe, D-Kansas City.

“So, as I was driving into Jeff (City) this morning for the bill signing, all I could think of was hoping that the governor woke up in a good mood today because I sure wanted to make sure that we got this bill passed and signed by the governor today. Very thankful to him,” Sharpe told Missourinet after the bill signing.

Fleeing from police in a vehicle at a high speed will soon become a felony in Missouri. “Valentine’s Law” is the name of the bill, named after St. Louis County police officer Antonio Valentine, who was killed in 2021 during a high-speed chase.

Advertisement

Under Luetkemeyer’s legislation, a suspect could spend one year to life in prison, depending on whether the chase leads to injuries or even worse.

“These high-speed chases are, unfortunately, all too frequent, where people will flee from law enforcement, and they pose a huge risk, not only to the police officer who’s pursuing them, like police officer Valentine, who was killed in a high-speed chase, but also the public at large, other vehicles that are out on the road,” Luetkemeyer said.

The legislation will also create a conviction review unit, which will allow prosecutors to reopen a case that was prosecuted in their jurisdiction if they believe there’s evidence of innocence.

“This is going to be very impactful, I would think, in particularly smaller counties, where you have a prosecutor, where it may be that he or she is the only prosecutor in the office, and they’re being asked to reconsider a murder conviction from the 1960s where they believe that there’s a claim of actual innocence,” he said.

The conviction review unit can dig into old case files and determine whether to recommend to the local prosecutor if the case should be reopened.

Advertisement

In addition, Luetkemeyer’s bill will increase the minimum age from 12 to 14 years old for a minor to be charged as an adult for any felony.

For more information on Senate Bill 754, click here.

Copyright © 2024 · Missourinet



Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending