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Montana State faces Grambling in First 4 matchup

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Montana State faces Grambling in First 4 matchup


Grambling Tigers (20-14, 17-4 SWAC) vs. Montana State Bobcats (17-17, 12-9 Big Sky)

Dayton, Ohio; Wednesday, 6:40 p.m. EDT

FANDUEL SPORTSBOOK LINE: Bobcats -4; over/under is 134.5

BOTTOM LINE: Montana State plays Grambling in the First Four round of the NCAA Tournament.

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The Bobcats have gone 12-9 against Big Sky opponents, with a 5-8 record in non-conference play. Montana State ranks fifth in the Big Sky with 13.1 assists per game led by Eddie Turner III averaging 3.7.

The Tigers’ record in SWAC action is 17-4. Grambling gives up 69.0 points to opponents while being outscored by 1.4 points per game.

Montana State averages 75.1 points, 6.1 more per game than the 69.0 Grambling allows. Grambling’s 44.0% shooting percentage from the field this season is 2.5 percentage points lower than Montana State has given up to its opponents (46.5%).

TOP PERFORMERS: Robert Ford III averages 2.3 made 3-pointers per game for the Bobcats, scoring 15.9 points while shooting 42.6% from beyond the arc. Turner is shooting 44.3% and averaging 13.3 points over the past 10 games.

Tra’Michael Moton is averaging 11.8 points and 1.7 steals for the Tigers. Jourdan Smith is averaging 11.7 points and 4.6 rebounds while shooting 52.1% over the last 10 games.

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LAST 10 GAMES: Bobcats: 6-4, averaging 76.7 points, 31.1 rebounds, 12.7 assists, 8.0 steals and 3.0 blocks per game while shooting 47.6% from the field. Their opponents have averaged 74.0 points per game.

Tigers: 9-1, averaging 71.0 points, 33.3 rebounds, 11.0 assists, 6.7 steals and 3.7 blocks per game while shooting 47.2% from the field. Their opponents have averaged 65.1 points.

The Associated Press created this story using technology provided by Data Skrive and data from Sportradar.



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Chris La Tray, Montana poet laureate, to speak at Bozeman Public Library 

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Chris La Tray, Montana poet laureate, to speak at Bozeman Public Library 


EBS STAFF 

Chris La Tray, Métis storyteller and Montana Poet Laureate, will speak with Montana Conversations at the Bozeman Public Library on April 22, at 6 p.m. Humanities Montana funds Montana Conversations, a program that brings trained facilitators across the state to conduct workshops and conversations on current affairs, culture and history.

“Whether as words on a page or shared orally, poetry becomes another means for telling and sharing stories; La Tray’s programs exist to remind people that their stories matter, that they are the only ones who can properly tell them, and that poetry, however it is defined, is a beautiful means for doing so,” BPL’s website says of La Tray. 

La Tray has authored “Short Poems and Essays from the World at Large.” His latest book, “Becoming Little Shell” is published by Milkweed Editions. La Tray is an enrolled member of the Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians. Read more about the event at BPL’s website.

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A plague of private ponds – the latest threat to Montana's fish and rivers • Daily Montanan

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A plague of private ponds – the latest threat to Montana's fish and rivers • Daily Montanan


Most Montanans would be surprised to hear there are more than 10,000 private ponds across our state — a state which is internationally known for its sparkling rivers and wild trout fisheries. One might also wonder why Montana’s Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks is approving 200 more private ponds every year  one a day for each working day at the agency. 

Yet, those numbers are real as related to a legislative interim committee by Eileen Ryce, the Department’s Fisheries Division Administrator whose job is to regulate the ponds and, more importantly, what fish get put in those ponds.  

But it’s tough to regulate when there are hardly any regulations — and when it comes to importing fish for private ponds, Montana’s regulatory structure barely exists.  It’s so bad Ryce is justifiably worried that tragedies will ensue as people have fish and the water they’re in shipped in from hatcheries all across the nation — and that happens more than a hundred times a year, not counting illegal shipments.

Simply put, hatcheries are designed for exactly one purpose – to grow as many fish as possible in as quickly as possible.  And therein lies the rub.  Because hatcheries concentrate far more fish into far less space than any natural river, lake, or stream, they have significant problems with diseases.

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Montanans who have been around for awhile will recall the outbreak of whirling disease on Montana’s Upper Madison River a few decades back that wiped out the rainbow trout.  But few know that Montana frequently received both fish and eggs from Colorado hatcheries, where biologists knew their hatcheries had whirling disease but believed it was a “hatchery disease” that wouldn’t survive in the wild.  

Not only did they continue to plant numerous streams and rivers in Colorado with diseased fish, Montana routinely received both fish and eggs from Colorado hatcheries and planted them in Montana’s waters — including Hebgen Lake, which is directly upstream from the Upper Madison. Just coincidence?  Hardly.  

So when it comes to private parties buying fish to stock their ponds from out-of-state hatcheries, the chance for diseases such as whirling, or any number of diseases common to hatcheries, is far from minimal.  According to the regulations, those hatcheries only have to be inspected annually and Montana’s private ponds get a license for 10 years between inspections. 

Disease, however, is only one of the threats.  The other is illegal introduction of species that are not allowed in Montana and are wholly inappropriate to be located near or in the flood plains of our major rivers.  Yes, in the floodplain — and Fish, Wildlife and Parks is indeed approving private ponds located in the flood plain, as well as outflows and groundwater connected to streams and rivers. 

It would be great to say Montana’s Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks is so competent that none of these threats will materialize.  But one only need to look at the agency’s introduction of mycis shrimp into Flathead Lake that wiped out the once abundant salmon fishery and completely changed the aquatic ecosystem to prove that assumption false.

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Agencies make mistakes — and they make a lot more when they don’t even have adequate regulations to follow.  Approving “a pond a day” basically ensures Montana’s world-famous rivers will be plagued by disease and illegal species introductions — and in this case, forewarned is not forearmed.  

So what can we do?  Fish, Wildlife and Parks should put a moratorium on new private pond approvals until a realistic and workable regulatory structure is in place.  After all, what’s the rush?  There are plenty of rivers and lakes to fish, so why risk the potential for disaster?



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'Dramatically change the industry': Billings developer soon to start on first 3D-printed home in Montana

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'Dramatically change the industry': Billings developer soon to start on first 3D-printed home in Montana


BILLINGS — Tim Stark has been reimagining the way people think about construction for years and now his company, Bespoke of Montana, will soon begin 3D-printing a duplex on Sioux Lane in Billings Heights.

“It’s a cool opportunity for Montana to be at the forefront of something that’s going to dramatically change the industry. Not only here but across the nation,” Stark said on Thursday. “We can’t keep doing what we’ve always done and expect different results, so we’re going to have to try something new.”

MTN News

Stark is using a 3D printer to build homes faster. He and his company have been working on this plan for years, becoming the first to gain the state’s approval to build a home with 3D walls in 2022. They now just need the printer to arrive from Dubai to get started.

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'Dramatically change the industry': Billings developer soon to start on first 3D-printed home in Montana

MTN News

“We’re trying to find out how we can build something that will last longer than these (previously built apartments) and perform better than what we’ve conventionally built in the past,” Stark said.

Bespoke of Montana was approached by HomeFront to build them the 3D home as a way to build homes more quickly. The home will be printed across the street from where man camps from Williston, North Dakota, will be recycled and reused to create apartment buildings.

“I am a native Montanan and it always seems that Montana is a few years behind the rest of the country if not the world, and in this particular case, we’re actually at the forefront of it,” Shannon Johnson, Bespoke of Montana’s director of operations, said. “We have really been spending a lot of hours making sure that we’ve got all of the pieces laid out exactly the way that we need to.”

'Dramatically change the industry': Billings developer soon to start on first 3D-printed home in Montana

MTN News

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Stark plans to start printing sometime this summer.

“I anticipate somebody would get to spend Christmas in here this year,” Stark said.

Billings developer one step closer to bringing 3D-printed homes to town





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