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Louisiana’s seasonally adjusted employment shows rise in unemployment, more job opportunities

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Louisiana’s seasonally adjusted employment shows rise in unemployment, more job opportunities


Data released today by the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics shows Louisiana’s seasonally adjusted nonfarm employment figure continues to add jobs as the number of unemployed individuals rise.

Nonfarm is a measure of the number of U.S. workers in the economy, excluding those in farms, private households, and non-profit organizations. The state’s seasonally adjusted total nonfarm employment for January 2024 increased by 7,600 jobs from December 2023, for a total of 1,958,400 jobs, a news release said. Compared to January 2023, seasonally adjusted total nonfarm employment increased by 6,200 jobs.

The Louisiana Workforce Commission uses seasonally adjusted data to provide a more valuable and telling picture of Louisiana’s jobs and employment situation.

The construction sector gained 2,400 jobs from December 2023, the release said. Other major industries showing the largest gains in the month include professional and business services, which gained 1,200 jobs, and government, which gained 1,200 jobs.

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The Department of Labor defines seasonal adjustment as a measurement that removes the influences of predictable seasonal patterns to reveal how employment and unemployment figures change from month to month. In the course of a year, the size of the labor force, the levels of employment and unemployment, and other measures of labor market activity undergo fluctuations due to seasonal events, including changes in weather, harvests, major holidays and school schedules. Seasonal adjustment reduces the impact of these changes, making it easier to understand trends.

The number of seasonally adjusted unemployed individuals for January 2024 is estimated to be 85,129.The number of unemployed rose by 2,502 individuals from the December 2023.

Compared to January 2023, the number of seasonally adjusted unemployed individuals increased by 9,231. The number of employed decreased by 680 individuals compared to December 2023. Ultimately, the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for January 2024 is 4.1%, which is tied for the third-lowest rate in a series history for the month of January, according to the Bureau Labor of Statistics.

“With the help of our stakeholders, Louisiana added over 7,000 nonfarm jobs for January, with the seriesseeing 34 consecutive months with an over-the-year gain,” said Louisiana Workforce CommissionSecretary Susana Schowen. “We stand readily available and are committed to continuing to workalongside our partners to host hiring fairs and provide resources for job seekers.”

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Among Louisiana’s MSAs in January 2024, seasonally adjusted data shows:

  • Baton Rouge (421,200 jobs) added 1,500 jobs from December 2023 and gained 4,400 jobs fromJanuary 2023.
  • Alexandria (61,200 jobs) lost 200 jobs from December 2023 and lost 200 jobs from January 2023.
  • Hammond (49,900 jobs) added 200 jobs from December 2023 and gained 1,100 jobs from January2023.
  • Houma (85,800 jobs) showed no change from December 2023, but gained 1,300 jobs from January2023.
  • Lafayette (205,500 jobs) added 900 jobs from December 2023 and gained 1,000 jobs from January2023.
  • Lake Charles (96,200 jobs) added 300 jobs from December 2023 and gained 300 jobs from January2023.
  • Monroe (77,300 jobs) lost 200 jobs from December 2023 and lost 900 jobs from January 2023.
  • New Orleans (559,200 jobs) lost 1,400 jobs from December 2023 and lost 7,700 jobs from January2023.
  • Shreveport (177,400 jobs) added 600 jobs from December 2023, but lost 1,100 jobs from January 2023



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Louisiana

Maps Show Which Louisiana Cities Will Be Under Water in 50 Years

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Maps Show Which Louisiana Cities Will Be Under Water in 50 Years


VERMILION PARISH, La. (KPEL News) – Louisiana’s disappearing coastline has been a topic of conversation for decades, and it seems like we’re always getting new warnings and dire predictions about our homes in south Louisiana suddenly becoming beachfront property.

People are deeply concerned about Louisiana’s coastline disappearing due to the severe environmental, economic, and social consequences it entails. Louisiana’s coast is rapidly eroding at an alarming rate, primarily due to factors such as land subsidence, sea-level rise, and human activities like oil and gas extraction and canal dredging.

The disappearance of Louisiana’s coastline poses a significant threat to the state’s unique ecosystems, including marshes, wetlands, and barrier islands, which serve as vital habitats for diverse wildlife and help protect inland areas from storm surges and flooding. As these coastal habitats disappear, the region becomes more vulnerable to the impacts of hurricanes, tropical storms, and other natural disasters, exacerbating the risk of property damage, loss of life, and displacement of communities.

Furthermore, Louisiana’s disappearing coastline has profound economic implications, particularly for industries such as fishing, tourism, and shipping, which rely on healthy coastal ecosystems for their livelihoods.

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The loss of coastal land also threatens critical infrastructure, including energy facilities, transportation networks, and freshwater supplies, further jeopardizing the state’s economy and public safety.

Overall, the disappearance of Louisiana’s coastline represents a pressing environmental and societal crisis that demands urgent action to mitigate its impacts and preserve this valuable natural resource for future generations.

However, there is one website out there that is attempting to show us what Louisiana might look like in 50 years if things don’t change.

Credit: Climate Central

Credit: Climate Center

Louisiana Parishes Underwater?

The map was created by climate researchers at Climate Center, which is an organization of scientists and journalists studying the impacts of climate change on the world. Their goal is to show what the future holds for coastal communities as sea level rise.

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Looking at the map Climate Center has provided, it looks like a lot of southern parishes could be at risk.

Just take a look at how much bigger Vermilion Bay could be getting by 2080 if their map holds true.

Credit: Climate Center

Credit: Climate Center

New Orleans being surrounded by levies is certainly beneficial for the Big Easy. It looks like everything surrounding the city is set to be underwater or close to being fully submerged in the half-century.

That, however, makes things worse in future hurricane seasons. Less land surrounding New Orleans means more powerful storms making landfall right on top of the city. That would be devastating if it holds true.

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Credit: Climate Center

Credit: Climate Center

As we endure extreme weather events, researchers warn that those events are becoming stronger and more common. Louisiana has spent a lot of time and money trying to stop its coastline from eroding away, but predictions like these certainly make the threat seem a lot more dire.

We’re no stranger to extreme weather events, though. Take a look at some of the worst most Louisiana residents still talk about.

Most Feared Weather Events in Louisiana

An unscientific poll revealed that south Louisiana residents are most fearful of these weather events.

Gallery Credit: Tracy Wirtz

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Louisiana Tech, De’Coldest Crawford to visit Bossier City Tuesday for a practice

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Louisiana Tech, De’Coldest Crawford to visit Bossier City Tuesday for a practice


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Louisiana Tech football fans will get an early look at a guy who could be the school’s next great receiver on Tuesday when the Bulldogs visit Bossier City’s Freedom Fields for a workout before Saturday’s spring game.

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Former Green Oaks wide receiver De’Coldest Crawford, who signed with Nebraska in 2021 after decommitting from LSU, is slated to be on hand for Tech’s Red River Run Through, which opens for fans at 5:30 p.m. next to First Bossier Church.

Crawford, a former 3-star recruit and Shreveport Times All-City player, caught 50 passes for 813 yards as a junior at Green Oaks, and had 30 catches for about 200 yards as a senior with a freshman quarterback. The 6-foot-1, 180-pound Crawford was injured in the 2022 Husker fall camp and was redshirted his only season with the Cornhuskers.

Huntington’s Zyion Claville and Kendrick Rucker, Airline’s Daxton Chavez, Benton’s Logan Smith, Loyola’s Ean Burch and Northwood’s Ja’Marrion Kennedy are additional Shreveport-Bossier athletes expected to participate.

PORTAL ENTRY: Nebraska’s De’Coldest Crawford enters transfer portal

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NEBRASKA SIGNEE: Green Oaks receiver De’Coldest Crawford, a former LSU commit, signs with Nebraska

While attendance and parking are free for the fan-friendly event, food trucks will be on hand selling food. There will be tailgate games and the Bulldogs will arrive at 6 p.m. with their practice session to begin by 6:30 and end at 8 p.m.

Following the practice, there will be an autograph signing session with the players.

“Our staff and football team are excited about returning to the Shreveport-Bossier area for our annual spring practice,” Tech coach Sonny Cumbie said in a release. “Last year’s practice was a huge success, and this year will be no different with the support of all of our alumni, fans and lettermen in the Shreveport-Bossier area.”

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Tech’s spring game is slated for 11 a.m. Saturday inside Joe Aillet Stadium.

The Bulldogs are seeking improvement from last season’s 3-9 record, which included six consecutive losses to end the campaign. Tech will have six home games this fall including bouts with FCS Nicholls State and Tulsa.

Jimmy Watson covers Louisiana sports for the USA TODAY Network. Email him at jwatson@shreveporttimes.com and follow him on Twitter @JimmyWatson6.

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Letters: Bills on insurance will shore up market in Louisiana

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Letters: Bills on insurance will shore up market in Louisiana


Homeowners insurance is a growing crisis in Louisiana. 

We know that bad weather is a part of the problem. What may be less obvious, but equally pernicious, is bad laws. In far too many cases, Louisiana has unusual or unique insurance laws that fail to protect our citizens, and have the opposite effect of driving up costs.

The good news is a range of proposed legislation is advancing this session that can bring Louisiana closer to the national norm, creating a more competitive, lower-cost insurance market, while still guarding our residents from bad actors.

One set of bills is Senate Bill 370 and House Bill 611, which would eliminate the “three-year” rule for new policies. The current law prohibits insurance companies from dropping clients after three years. While this seems like good consumer protection on its face, the fact that Louisiana is the only state in America with the rule strongly suggests that it is a bad idea, as existing insurance companies game it (e.g., increasing premiums) and new insurance companies are hesitant to enter the market.

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Furthermore, Louisiana’s “bad faith” statute currently lacks clarity for policyholders and insurers, resulting in unnecessary litigation, which ultimately increases costs for everyone. Senate Bill 323 and House Bill 678 would define rights, duties and timelines to ensure swift resolution of claims processes. At the same time, penalties for bad faith would be cut from 200% to 50%, reducing motivation for legal abuse.

Finally, House Bill 120, which extends the Louisiana Fortify Homes Program, would help us help ourselves. The program provides grants of up to $10,000 for homeowners to strengthen their roofs to withstand hurricane winds, providing more safety and lower insurance premiums.

We can only hope for good weather. But this session, we can support better laws that will maintain consumer protection, while increasing competition and lowering costs.

CHRIS KANE

chairman, Greater New Orleans, Inc.

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