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Drone helps locate missing family dog in New Jersey woods

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Drone helps locate missing family dog in New Jersey woods


SOUTH AMBOY, New Jersey (WABC) — A family in New Jersey has been reunited with their dog, who is lucky to be alive

On Friday, both one of the two dogs, Guinness made a run for it and then got hit by a car before going missing in some nearby woods.

“I stopped breathing. I couldn’t sleep, knowing he was out there,” said Mary Van Sant.

Fighting against the frightening ordeal, friends and family searched — but Guiness was gone.

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Help soon arrived after the owners contacted a nonprofit, called U.A.A.R. Drone Team, which specializes in finding missing people and pets, among other things.

“I had to find the dog for them,” said Michael Parziale, founder of the U.S.A.R. Drone Team. “We covered literally a mile.”

Thanks to drone technology, after two days missing, Guinness was found.

As a result of having gone missing, Guinness rushed to the vet with injuries, which requires surgery.

But he’s going to be okay.

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Appeals court promises quick ruling on appeal of order barring county-line ballots • New Jersey Monitor

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Appeals court promises quick ruling on appeal of order barring county-line ballots • New Jersey Monitor


A federal appeals court will swiftly decide whether to allow the use of county-line ballots in June’s Democratic primary after hearing oral arguments Friday in Rep. Andy Kim’s case against the county line, one of the three judges on the panel said.

During the nearly two-hour hearing, an attorney for the Camden County Democratic Committee alleged the county line should be allowed to continue because it furthers the associational rights of political organizations. County-line ballots allow candidates backed by party organizations to be grouped or bracketed together on primary ballots.

“Political parties have the right, whatever the affiliation of the political party, whatever the faction of the political party, have the right to associate with and not associate with endorsed and not-endorsed candidates,” Bill Tambussi, the attorney, told the court.

Tambussi argued that existing state case law had confirmed the line’s legality and said that barring candidates from bracketing is an unconstitutional infringement of counties’ associational rights.

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Kim (D-03) and his co-plaintiffs, congressional candidates Sara Schoengood and Carolyn Rush, have argued New Jersey’s county-line ballot design violates constitutional protections on free association and the U.S. Constitution’s elections clause. They argue the county line requires candidates to associate with candidates they may not want to in order to avoid inferior ballot placement and improperly influences election outcomes by giving party-backed candidates better ballot placement.

A lower-court judge sided with Kim two weeks ago and ordered county clerks not to use county-line ballots in June’s Democratic primaries. The judge said clerks must use office-block ballots, which instead group candidates based on the office they’re seeking.

Most of the clerks initially appealed the order but have since dropped out of the appeal and are moving forward with printing office-block ballots for June. The Camden committee is the only organization still challenging the lower-court order.

Judges on Friday appeared skeptical of Camden Democrats’ associational arguments, noting 49 other states and two of New Jersey’s own counties use a ballot design that Tambussi claims is unconstitutional.

“If not having bracketing is unconstitutional, then 49 out of 50 states are doing something severely wrong,” said Judge Arianna Freeman.

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Judges also questioned Tambussi’s arguments on associational rights, noting Kim’s suit does not seek to bar the use of slogans that could tie endorsed candidates to a party.

“They’re saying, sloganeer all you want,” said Judge Kent Jordan.

Jordan added that the question here is, “Are you constitutionally entitled to a ballot form that will, according to the facts found by the district court, clearly put a thumb on the scale.”

Sean Marotta, an attorney for the Middlesex County Democratic Organization, which joined the case as a friend of the court, argued that candidates like Rush and Schoengood who do not win the endorsement of local party leaders should be treated like independent candidates in general elections. He cited a state law that bars parties that did not earn 10% of the vote share in the most recent general election with Assembly seats on the ballot from winning top ballot spots (in New Jersey, only Republican and Democratic parties meet that bar).

“It’s random whether it’s Republicans or Democrats who get the first column,” Marotta said. “Then all of the independent petition candidates are put in the third column stacked on top of each other, and this court upheld that.” 

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Brett Pugach, an attorney for Kim and his co-plaintiffs, argued in response that for general elections, there could be a state interest in maintaining a two-party system. Such an interest does not exist in primaries, when only Republicans and Democrats are on the ballot, he said.

Camden Democrats have argued that the advantage granted by the county line — the lower court’s fact-finding placed it at roughly 11 points — is not a severe enough burden to trigger deep scrutiny of the state’s interest in party lines. Such a finding would trigger a less stringent standard of review.

Pugach argued the contrary, citing the lower court’s findings and adding that the harms posed by county-line ballots still outweigh the state’s interest in maintaining them. He noted that county clerks and Camden Democrats did not offer evidence demonstrating such a state interest.

“In other words, even if the court didn’t apply a severe burden, it’s still a sliding-scale analysis, and as I said before, there’s no evidence in the record as to the state interest,” Pugach said.

Both sides discussed a letter Attorney General Matt Platkin sent the lower-court judge that calls the county-line ballot design unconstitutional and says Platkin would not defend it in court.

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Judges asked attorneys Friday whether they should consider the letter. Kim’s lawyers argued in favor, saying the letter is part of the record and Platkin’s refusal to defend the statute is itself notable to the court. Tambussi argued it should be discounted because Platkin did not move to join the case.

“He had the opportunity to step into the case because the secretary of state was a party to the case. He had the opportunity to do that, and he did not,” Tambussi said.

It’s not clear when the appeals panel will issue its ruling, though the promise of promptness and looming election deadlines should ensure a quick resolution.

“Today, we reaffirmed that the evidence presented in this case establishes an unfair burden on voters and candidates that hinders the democratic process. The Court promised a prompt decision, which we look forward to reading,” Pugach said in a statement.

Clerks are due to begin sending out mail-in ballots by April 20, though courts can and have delayed such deadlines in the past. Earlier election deadlines on ballot printing are paused in some counties while state courts hear a separate ballot case over the Republican primary.

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Because Kim’s lawsuit was launched only by Democratic candidates, the order barring county-line ballots in June applies only to that party’s primaries.

Republican candidates have sued in state court to force the use of office-block ballots in their primaries, and the Burlington County Republican Committee has sued the county’s clerk, alleging she violated state law when designing an office-block ballot for June GOP races.

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NJEDA approves creation of $7M program to prepare New Jersey residents for jobs in green economy | ROI-NJ

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NJEDA approves creation of $7M program to prepare New Jersey residents for jobs in green economy | ROI-NJ


A $7 million grant program was approved Thursday by the New Jersey Economic Development Authority to create the Green Workforce Training Grant Challenge aimed at preparing New Jerseyans for green economy careers.

“Gov. Phil Murphy is committed to investing in our clean energy future, and, through programs like the Green Workforce Training Grant, the NJEDA is spearheading initiatives that increase access to skills and training, putting New Jerseyans at the forefront of green economy careers,” NJEDA CEO Tim Sullivan said. “Through this important workforce development program, New Jersey is investing in our clean energy future by expanding opportunities and ensuring equitable access to good-paying jobs for all residents, especially those in overburdened communities.”

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The program, which is funded with $4.35 million through the Council on the Green Economy and $2.65 million from the Wind Institute, will have a particular focus on advancing diversity, equity & inclusion and serving overburdened communities.

Grants from $250,000 up to $1.5 million are available. Applicants will be asked to submit proposals that outline their plans to develop and implement workforce supports to bolster the green economy. Awardees may use funds to cover design, planning, capital and implementation costs to offer training programs in green economy industries.

“The Green Workforce Training Grant Challenge is a unique chance for entities across the state of New Jersey, as it provides funds for them to train residents for jobs in the green economy, while ensuring a diverse workforce,” Executive Director of the Governor’s Office of Climate Action and the Green Economy and Council on the Green Economy Eric Miller said. “This Grant Challenge will provide long-lasting solutions that will protect our environment while creating opportunities for our state’s workforce.”

“We are experiencing a clean-energy renaissance, and New Jersey is positioning its residents to succeed in this emerging industry,” NJEDA Vice President of Offshore Wind Jen Becker said. “This grant challenge will build our talent pipeline for the growing offshore wind and green economy sectors and will help to ensure equitable access to the industry for diverse workers and overburdened communities.”

Eligible applicants include, but are not limited to, community-based organizations, workforce training organizations, labor unions, technical high schools, county colleges, nonprofits, regional workforce development boards and private-sector companies. Applicants must include at least one Community-Based Organization that serves one or more New Jersey overburdened communities as part of their application.

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3 New Jersey Devils Trades To Actually Move Needle On Brady Tkachuk

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3 New Jersey Devils Trades To Actually Move Needle On Brady Tkachuk


There are more and more rumors coming out that Brady Tkachuk could be available this offseason. It’s probably just scuttlebutt that we always see at this time of the year. Teams with stars who don’t make the playoffs will always see their stars put into trades. And they always look horrible. 

Heck, we will probably see it this year with the Devils. Get ready to see the “Jack Hughes for two second-round picks and a B+ prospect” or the “Jesper Bratt for this gritty player who had 22 points last season,” or our favorite, “Josh Anderson for your whole franchise.” Every trade you see on the internet is probably terrible.

Wait… what are we doing here? Are we making trades again? Welp, this one is a little different. This isn’t just the normal trades we would do. Instead, let’s talk about what it would actually take for a new ownership group to trade its captain and star. (Spoiler alert: it would be a ton.)

Captain for captain. This would be one of the most insane trades in history. We’ve seen some insane trades that saw two star players moved for each other. The Devils have been involved in many of them, but this would be even bigger than Taylor Hall for Adam Larsson. It might even be bigger than P.K. Subban for Shea Weber because of everything it means for both of these franchises. Tkachuk for Nico Hischier would send one team’s captain to another for their captain.

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This would be the first captain for captain trade in a decade. In 2014, the New York Rangers sent Ryan Callahan to the Tampa Bay Lightning in the deal that sent Martin St. Louis to Broadway. However, St. Louis was near the end of his career and Callahan did not have the ceiling of Tkachuk or Hischier. This would be changing everything we thought we knew about both these teams.

It seems incredibly unlikely (obviously), but we know that Fitzgerald at last tried on Matthew Tkachuk. If Brady Tkachuk is traded to New Jersey, who we know is related to the Devils GM, it might be a family reunion. The real issue here is the Devils can’t afford to lose another center. Hischier is the only reason we’re not sounding the alarm for the lack of center prospects and the loss of Michael McLeod after his sexual assault arrest.



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