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Rentschler Biopharma’s New Production Line in Massachusetts Now Fully Operational

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Rentschler Biopharma’s New Production Line in Massachusetts Now Fully Operational


Rentschler Biopharma reports that its new production line, formerly known as the Rentschler Biopharma Manufacturing Center, in Milford, MA, is now fully operational.

The multi-product facility, which doubles Rentschler Biopharma’s global cGMP capacity, is focusing mainly on commercial production of highly complex molecules. The original Milford site went from a single-product commercial facility to producing multiple products in an up to 500L bioreactor setup.

The new production line has added 22,000 square feet of manufacturing cleanroom space and houses four new 2,000L single-use bioreactors, bringing the total of production lines at the site up to three.

“The completion of our new production line is an important milestone for our company and emphasizes Rentschler Biopharma’s strong capabilities in the U.S.,” said Benedikt von Braunmühl, CEO of Rentschler Biopharma. “Indeed, in 2023, Rentschler Biopharma was proud to contribute to nearly 25% of the biopharmaceuticals approved by the FDA.”

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Massachusetts

SD PUC fines Massachusetts-based company $15,000

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SD PUC fines Massachusetts-based company $15,000


PIERRE, S.D. (KELO) — A Massachusetts-based company that specializes in buying a specific type of oil seed from farmers now faces a $15,000 civil penalty in South Dakota.

The South Dakota Public Utilities Commission imposed the punishment against Yield10 Bioscience Inc. of Woburn, MA, after an evidentiary hearing on Friday. Yield10 was notified of the complaint and the proceeding but wasn’t represented.

The commission found that Yield10 had failed to provide notification that the company was no longer in compliance with financial conditions required for South Dakota-licensed grain buyers and didn’t provide information within five days that was requested by the commission’s staff.

Each set of violations carried a maximum civil penalty of $20,000, for a possible total amount of $40,000. Commission chair Kristie Fiegen proposed $15,000.

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“Our goal at the PUC is to make sure our producers are protected, and we want answers right away,” Fiegen said. “Producers were not impacted, but they could have been.”

Commissioner Chris Nelson asked why she chose $15,000. “I don’t think we should do the maximum, because no one was hurt,” Fiegen explained.

Nelson said he could have gone higher. Fiegen encouraged him to suggest more.

The third commissioner, Gary Hanson, however said he would have suggested $5,000 on each violation for a total of $10,000.

“So it sounds like a sweet spot,” Hanson said about the $15,000.

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The commission voted 3-0 for that amount.

Fiegen and Nelson recognized the staff for its work.

“These are not easy,” Nelson said. “You shouldn’t had to have to go through all the work on this.”

During the hearing, grain-warehouse division manager Cody Chambliss presented information about the staff’s interactions with Yield10, including their exchanges of emails and correspondence.

Chambliss said the company buys camelina, an oil seed that is rarely grown in South Dakota. He said the company claimed it never purchased camelina from South Dakota producers.

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A news release issued by Yield10 on Wednesday night said the company’s assets were being purchased by the seed technologies platform of Nufarm Limited, an Australia-based company.

Nelson said the commission asked the Legislature for the two statutes in 2013 after “the Anderson Seed fiasco” in 2012 that saw a sunflower buyer go bankrupt.

Chambliss said the statutes had been used to levy a civil penalty once since then. That matter involved H&I Grain in 2017. When asked for his recommendation, Chambliss said a minimum of $5,000 for each of the two violations and upward to $10,000 for each.

“We’re fortunate here there weren’t any producer losses,” Chambliss said. He said it’s “very rare” that a company can suffer a financial loss and not have losses incurred by producers.

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Seven Massachusetts state Senators urge Biden to drop his candidacy

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Seven Massachusetts state Senators urge Biden to drop his candidacy


Seven Democratic members of the Massachusetts State Senate have released an
open letter urging President Joe Biden to end his re-election bid so another candidate can be nominated at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago next month.

In addition to Senator Jason Lewis, who
called on Biden to end his campaign after the president struggled in his first debate with former President Donald Trump last month, the letter was signed by Senators Jo Comerford, Jamie Eldridge, Paul Feeney, Pat Jehlen, John Keenan, and Michael Moore.

Eldridge is a member of the Massachusetts delegation headed to the DNC.

The letter praised Biden for a “lifetime of distinguished public service,” but warned that his status as the Democrats’ presumptive nominee has become a dangerous liability.

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“President Biden has consistently lagged behind Donald Trump in national and battleground states for months, and now reliable polls are even showing competitive races in blue states like Virginia and Minnesota,” the group wrote. “A growing number of Democratic congressional leaders are deeply concerned that if President Biden remains at the top of the ticket, MAGA Republicans will control the presidency and both houses of Congress. This would be catastrophic for Massachusetts and our entire nation.”

The group’s call comes at a moment when pressure is intensifying on Biden to leave the race. Also Thursday, John Tester of Montana became the second Democratic U.S. Senator, after Peter Welch of Vermont, to urge Biden to end his candidacy. On Wednesday, California Congressman Adam Schiff became the most prominent member of the U.S House to issue such a call. And according to multiple reports, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, House Minority Leader Hakeem Jeffries, and House Speaker Emerita Nancy Pelosi have all expressed deep concern to Biden about his prospects in recent days.

Earlier this month, Governor Maura Healey became the first Democratic governor to suggest that Biden consider exiting the race. U.S. Rep. Seth Moulton has
urged Biden to drop his bid, and Representatives Jake Auchincloss and Lori Trahan have suggested that the president reevaluate his commitment to seeking reelection.

While the new letter from the seven state senators called for a different candidate to be nominated at the DNC next month, it did not explicitly state how that candidate should be selected. It did, however, suggest that switching standard bearers would give Democrats an immediate boost, and that a new Democratic candidate would have ample time to make his or her case to the electorate.

“Selecting a new Democratic presidential nominee will inject badly needed excitement and grassroots energy into the party and its voters, especially young people,” the letter said. “There will be plenty of time after the convention for the new nominee to run a winning campaign and defeat Donald Trump.”

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A new
poll from Suffolk University and the Boston Globe found that nearly two-thirds of registered Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents in Massachusetts would prefer someone other than Biden as the party’s nominee.





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Shocker: This New England State Gets the Most Lightning in the Region

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Shocker: This New England State Gets the Most Lightning in the Region


Summertime and the living is easy. The weather can be rough, especially if you don’t like heat and humidity – and then there are the summer thunderstorms.

All of it beats winter cold and snow, as far as I am concerned.

New Bedford has the record for the hottest temperature recorded in Massachusetts, when it hit 107 degrees on August 2, 1975. I remember how my friends and I cruised Acushnet Avenue in a 1967 Mustang convertible. My friends Bob and Debbie were married that day.

Hot and humid weather can lead to unstable air and thunderstorms.

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Earth Networks stated that “Massachusetts typically experiences 10-30 thunderstorms per year, with most activity occurring in the summer.”

“In 2020, Massachusetts ranked 38th in the country for total lightning pulses, which is the combination of cloud-to-ground (CG) and in-cloud (IC) lightning strikes,” Earth Networks reported.

This New England State Gets The Most Lightning In The Region

Courtesy John Tomase.

Lightning is most common in the United States in June, July and August when more than 60 percent of the year’s lightning occurs.

June is the most active month for lightning in Massachusetts, followed by August and July. Those are also the months when the most dangerous thunderstorm alerts are issued.

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Of the 14 counties in Massachusetts, Bristol County ranked 10th in 2020 for total lightning pulses experienced. Worcester County had the most, followed by Middlesex County. Nantucket County had the least. Plymouth County ranked seventh.

Texas recorded the most lightning pulses in 2020, 63,683,799, followed by Florida with 35,430,198.

Massachusetts was 38th with 1,267,046, the most lightning pulses of the six New England states, followed by Connecticut, New Hampshire, Maine and Vermont. Rhode Island was 48th with 190,992.

LOOK: The most expensive weather and climate disasters in recent decades

Stacker ranked the most expensive climate disasters by the billions since 1980 by the total cost of all damages, adjusted for inflation, based on 2021 data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The list starts with Hurricane Sally, which caused $7.3 billion in damages in 2020, and ends with a devastating 2005 hurricane that caused $170 billion in damage and killed at least 1,833 people. Keep reading to discover the 50 of the most expensive climate disasters in recent decades in the U.S.

Gallery Credit: KATELYN LEBOFF

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