Connect with us

Wisconsin

Gov. Evers, Department of Tourism Announce Wisconsin Tourism Sees Another Record-Breaking Year

Published

on

Gov. Evers, Department of Tourism Announce Wisconsin Tourism Sees Another Record-Breaking Year


MADISON, Wis. (OFFICE OF GOVERNOR TONY EVERS PRESS RELEASE) – Gov. Tony Evers today, together with Wisconsin Department of Tourism Secretary Anne Sayers, announced Wisconsin’s tourism industry saw another record-breaking year in 2023. According to 2023 economic impact data, the tourism industry generated $25 billion in total economic impact, surpassing the previous record year of $23.7 billion set in 2022.

“Wisconsin has so much to offer, from waterslides to watersports, hiking trails to contrails, and world-champion sports teams to world-champion cheese, so it’s no wonder we’ve seen yet another record-breaking year for Wisconsin tourism for the second year in a row,” said Gov. Evers. “These numbers show what an important role our tourism economy plays in our state’s economic success. And this didn’t happen by chance—this happens because of the hardworking folks in this critical industry who work day in and day out to make sure visitors enjoy their time here and come back year after year. We’ve been proud to help support their good work by making smart, strategic investments over the last several years to support Wisconsin’s tourism industry, and our hard work together is clearly paying off.”

In 2023, Wisconsin saw a $25 billion total economic impact, an increase of 5.4 percent from the previous year, welcomed 113 million visits—nearly two million more than the previous year, and saw the highest-ever overnight visits, with nearly 46 million overnight visits last year. This is the second consecutive year of record-breaking overnight visitation. What’s more, overnight visitors, on average, spend almost three times as much as day-trip visitors.

In total, in 2023, all 72 Wisconsin counties saw economic impact growth, and the industry supported more than 178,000 part-time and full-time jobs across various sectors, which is an increase of two percent and generated $1.6 billion in state and local tax revenue, up 5.8 percent from 2022.

Advertisement

“Wisconsin tourism powers the economy and strengthens the fabric of communities of all sizes,” said Wisconsin Tourism Secretary Sayers. “The historic impact of tourism reached every corner of Wisconsin and, in doing so, sustained livelihoods for thousands of our friends and neighbors.”

Bolstered by funds provided in the 2019-21 and 2021-23 state budgets signed by Gov. Evers, Travel Wisconsin marketed the state as a premier travel destination in 2023, running advertising campaigns throughout the year. The campaigns, which celebrate Wisconsin’s welcoming nature and celebratory spirit, reached visitors in 12 Midwestern markets.

In addition, the 2023-25 biennial budget signed by Gov. Evers invested approximately $34 million over the biennium to raise Wisconsin’s profile across the country as a premier business, cultural, and recreational destination. This is the largest increase in marketing and advertising funds for the Wisconsin Department of Tourism in state history, and with this investment, the department will be able to run a competitive marketing campaign and keep pace with neighboring states.

Further, this exciting announcement comes as, last month, Gov. Evers and the Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation (WEDC) requested the release of $10 million in already-approved funding for the Opportunity Attraction and Promotion Fund created in the 2023-25 biennial budget signed by Gov. Evers to continue Wisconsin’s recent success in recruiting and hosting large-scale events, such as the 2020 Democratic National Convention, the 2021 Ryder Cup, the 2024 Republican National Convention, and the 2025 NFL draft. The Evers Administration submitted a formal s. 13.10 request to the Republican-controlled Joint Committee on Finance to release the $10 million investment. The Republican supermajority on the committee decided to release just $5 million, only half of the amount approved in the biennial budget.

Additionally, last November, Gov. Evers also announced $36.6 million in grants for building projects across the state in Janesville, Milwaukee, Green Bay, and Door County that were previously rejected by members of the Wisconsin State Legislature in the 2023-25 Capital Budget process. The governor’s investment is projected to support over 400 jobs and nearly $68 million in economic activity. The effort, funded using American Rescue Plan Act funds, will ensure the projects can move forward and build upon Gov. Evers’ and the Evers Administration’s strategic investments that will have long-term impacts on the state’s tourism industry, workforce, and economy.

Advertisement

Since 2020, Gov. Evers has directed investments totaling more than $1 billion of Wisconsin’s federal pandemic relief funds in economic resilience, and more than $200 million of that total was invested in the travel and tourism, hotels and lodging, and entertainment industries alone.

The Native Nations of Wisconsin also play a critical role in enriching the state’s tourism industry offerings and attracting travelers to the state. Because Tribal tourism data is private, the total economic impact of Tribal tourism is not wholly reflected in this report.

To learn more about Wisconsin tourism’s record-breaking year, view the 2023 economic data, including a county-by-county breakdown, visit: industry.travelwisconsin.com/research/economic-impact.



Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Wisconsin

New Mexico linebacker Mason Posa makes it official: He commits to Wisconsin’s 2025 class

Published

on

New Mexico linebacker Mason Posa makes it official: He commits to Wisconsin’s 2025 class


play

MADISON – Mason Posa’s official visit to Wisconsin, which began on May 31, went better than anyone could have expected.

The 6-foot-3, 210-pound linebacker from Albuquerque, New Mexico, left Madison almost certain he would choose UW.

Advertisement

Posa made his decision official Thursday when he announced he had committed to UW for the 2025 class.

His other two choices were Oregon and Texas A&M.

The Aggies were originally scheduled to host Posa on a visit later this month.

“The coaches, I knew they were great,” Posa said on 247’s YouTube channel after making his announcement. “I knew the town was amazing. But what I was looking for on these officials visits was which players I felt comfortable with.

“And Wisconsin just fit me. Those players were great to me. I had a blast out there. I knew Wisconsin was home.”

Advertisement

Posa recorded seven sacks, 14 tackles for loss and 99 total tackles as a junior.

Including Posa, UW has 18 known commitments for the 2025 class.

That includes four linebackers for defensive coordinator Mike Tressel – Posa, Cooper Catalano of Germantown High School, Brenden Anes of Tennessee and Samuel Lateju of New Jersey.

What does Posa believe he will bring to UW?

Advertisement

“I’m ready to go win them championships,” he said. “I’m ready to bring a national title to the University of Wisconsin. I’m excited. I love Madison. I love that coaching staff…

“I want to be a first-round pick. I want to be in the NFL and I want to win us a national title. I know some of the recruits we have…there is something special coming at Wisconsin.”

More: Wisconsin football transfer portal tracker: Who’s heading out and who’s heading in?



Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Wisconsin

Wisconsin Republicans react to Donald Trump calling Milwaukee “horrible”

Published

on

Wisconsin Republicans react to Donald Trump calling Milwaukee “horrible”


Wisconsin Republicans reacted to former President Donald Trump reportedly calling Milwaukee “a horrible city” during a closed-door meeting on Thursday.

Trump visited the U.S. Capitol for the first time since his supporters sieged the building on January 6, 2021, in a failed attempt to halt certification of President Joe Biden’s victory. The ex-president met with GOP lawmakers as a precursor to the Republican National Convention in Milwaukee—set for July 15 to July 18—where Trump is expected to be chosen as the party’s nominee.

Jake Sherman, founder of Punchbowl News who covers the Hill, reported on X, formerly Twitter, that Trump told House Republicans on Thursday, “Milwaukee, where we are having our convention, is a horrible city.”

Trump spokesperson Steven Cheung responded to Sherman’s reporting to X on Thursday, writing, “Wrong. Total bull****. He never said it like how it’s been falsely characterized as. He was talking about how terrible crime and voter fraud are.”

Advertisement

Newsweek reached out to Cheung via email for comment on Thursday.

Former President Donald Trump on Thursday speaks to the press at the National Republican Senatorial Committee building in Washington, D.C. Wisconsin Republicans on Thursday reacted to Trump reportedly calling Milwaukee “a horrible city” during a…


Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

House Republicans from Wisconsin defended Trump but shared different interpretations of the former president’s comment.

“Another classic example of s****y reporting by a Democratic Party shill pretending to be a journalist. Lies busy omission. @realDonaldTrump was specifically referring to the crime the CRIME RATE in Milwaukee,” Representative Derrick Van Orden wrote on X.

Van Orden included a photo of a Spectrum News article titled, “Milwaukee ranks third for violent crimes nationwide,” from May 2023.

Sherman shared an April article from Wisconsin Public Radio titled, “Homicides in Milwaukee down nearly 50 percent compared to 2 years ago.”

Advertisement

Some said that Trump was referring to election integrity. After Trump lost to Biden in 2020, he claimed that the election was rigged against him. Biden won Wisconsin by a slim 0.7 percent margin, and there is no evidence to suggest there was election fraud in Wisconsin or any widespread fraud in 2020.

Representative Scott Fitzgerald told Matt Smith, political director of WISN, a Milwaukee ABC affiliate, that Trump’s comment was delivered after a question posed to him about election integrity: “What he was talking about was the elections in Milwaukee. They’re concerned about them.”

Lawrence Andrea, Washington correspondent for the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, said on X that Representative Glenn Grothman told him that Trump was “concerned about the election in MKE” and “felt we need to do better in urban centers around the country.”

Representative Bryan Steil said on X: “I was in the room. President Trump did not say this. There is no better place than Wisconsin in July.”

Steil told Smith, “He wasn’t talking about the city. He was talking about specific issues in the city,” before the congressman listed issues such as crime and the public school system but would not say which issues Trump mentioned, according to the clip Smith shared on X.

Advertisement

Milwaukee Mayor Cavalier Johnson, a Democrat, told reporters on Thursday, “Donald Trump wants to talk about things that he thinks are horrible, all of us lived through his presidency, so right back at ya, buddy.”

Johnson called Trump “unhinged” for making the comment and said he was “wrong” about Milwaukee.

Biden seized the chance to score some points with Wisconsinites, posting to X on Thursday, “I happen to love Milwaukee,” to which Johnson replied, “Milwaukee loves you back, President Joe Biden!”

Uncommon Knowledge

Newsweek is committed to challenging conventional wisdom and finding connections in the search for common ground.

Advertisement

Newsweek is committed to challenging conventional wisdom and finding connections in the search for common ground.





Source link

Continue Reading

Wisconsin

UW-Oshkosh officially announces closure of UW-Fox Cities campus in Menasha

Published

on

UW-Oshkosh officially announces closure of UW-Fox Cities campus in Menasha


MENASHA, Wis. (WFRV) – The University of Wisconsin Oshkosh Chancellor Andrew Leavitt has officially announced the “discontinuation of teaching and learning at the UWO Fox Cities Campus” in Menasha effective June 30, 2025.

According to a release from UW-Oshkosh, Universities of Wisconsin President Jay Rothman reviewed UWO’s analysis, supports its conclusions, and has directed the university to move forward.

We reach this decision after spending a year analyzing UWO Fox Cities enrollment, the region’s and state’s changing demographics, student participation rates, the regional higher-education landscape, potential for new and unique academic offerings and economic trends in the competitive Fox Valley marketplace. In the end, we made a difficult but responsible decision.

University of Wisconsin Oshkosh Chancellor Andrew Leavitt

Outagamie County Executive Tom Nelson criticized the University’s decision in a statement provided earlier on June 13.

Advertisement

Officials with the University say that total enrollment has declined nearly 67% over the past decade at UW-Fox Cities, with the five-year average decline at nearly 19%.

“With the number of high school graduates in Wisconsin expected to fall by 13% over the next decade, and given the regional trends, UWO’s analysis projects the potential for fewer than 100 UWO Fox Cities students by 2032,” UW-Oshkosh’s statement read.

According to the campus’ website, there are 1,367 students at the Fox Cities campus.

“The challenges facing the campus, and indeed facing higher education in general, are not of our own making,” UWO Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs Ed Martini stated in a university analysis. “They are a reflection of massive changes in our state, our nation, and our world that have increasingly threatened the educational models on which the Fox campus was founded and in which it thrived for many years.”

Local 5 will continue to follow this story and provide updates when new information or details are released.

Advertisement



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending