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BadgerBlitz – Preview: Badgers seek revenge in rematch against Northwestern

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BadgerBlitz  –  Preview: Badgers seek revenge in rematch against Northwestern


Wisconsin (13-8) vs. Northwestern (15-7)

Recreation: Sunday, Feb. 5 contained in the Kohl Heart

Time: 5:30 P.M CT

Watch: BTN

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Pay attention: 1310 WIBA AM and 101.5 FM (Matt Lepay and Mike Lucas on the decision); stream on-line on iHeartRadio

Prediction: Wisconsin 61, Northwestern 58

Observe On-line: The Badgers’ Den

Twitter: @Badger_Blitz

The Badgers picked up an enormous win in opposition to Ohio State on the street Thursday, stopping their skid and getting them again to only one sport beneath .500 in Huge Ten play.

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It was a sport Wisconsin primarily needed to win. A four-game loosing streak in convention play would’ve nearly doomed this group’s event possibilities. They’re nonetheless on extremely skinny ice in terms of the postseason, however breaking even within the Huge Ten could be sufficient to punch a ticket to the NCAA event. Thus, each sport remaining is of huge magnitude.

Wisconsin’s subsequent probability to enhance their resume will come Sunday when the Wildcats roll into city. Northwestern already beat the Badgers again on January twenty third in a thriller in Evanston. Coming off additional relaxation because of the sport initially being rescheduled, Wisconsin got here out flat within the first half and could not put it away regardless of outscoring the Wildcats within the second half.

It was a winnable sport for the Badgers, one they’re going to assuredly look again on with remorse. Wisconsin had all types of issues in Welsh-Ryan area. They missed 9 of their last ten pictures and went ice chilly down the stretch (sound acquainted?). They solely shot 10-of-31 from downtown.

Northwestern’s protection was swarming, setting the tone bodily and protecting Wisconsin from operating what they needed to run offensively. They pressured Chucky Hepburn and Tyler Wahl into extremely inefficient performances, which doomed the Badgers. Hepburn shot 4-of-16 from the sector and 3-of-9 from downtown. Wahl scored 11 factors — on 10 pictures.

Within the sequel, Wisconsin merely should play higher on offense. They should play at their very own tempo and never let the Wildcats’ stingy protection get them off-kilter. Greg Gard could must get inventive — Northwestern was all around the Badgers typical screening and pick-and-roll motion. They’re significantly adept at switching off the ball, which is an enormous cause why Wisconsin was struggling to seek out the open man within the first assembly.

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Steven Crowl have to be a much bigger issue offensively than he was the primary time round. He scored eight factors on 3-of-7 from the ground, the one starter to not attain double figures. Wisconsin’s offense is at its greatest once they can feed Crowl inside and let him go to work. The Wildcats are too good on the perimeter defensively for the Badgers to depend on exterior capturing Sunday.

The Huge Ten is riddled with technically sound groups, and Northwestern isn’t any outlier. They handle the ball however additionally they take it away: their steal share (7.2) is sixth-best within the nation, in accordance with KenPom.

As soon as once more, Boo Buie and Chase Audige would be the major gamers Wisconsin must shut down. Within the first assembly, these two mixed to drop 36 factors on the Badgers. The senior guards are the center of this upstart Northwestern group, and each can rating in quite a lot of methods. They every wish to let it fly from deep, averaging about six three-point makes an attempt per sport. Neither has been essentially the most environment friendly shooter, however they get it executed with their array of offensive instruments. In addition they every contribute in different methods — Audige has racked up a formidable 58 steals, whereas Buie has dished out 99 assists on the season.

Wisconsin has already danced with the Wildcats as soon as this season, and so they got here up brief in crunch time. They’re going to must fare higher Sunday on the Kohl Heart to maintain their season afloat.





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Wisconsin’s ‘Mad City’ is a rational choice for Biden’s appeal to youth

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Wisconsin’s ‘Mad City’ is a rational choice for Biden’s appeal to youth


President Biden gestures after speaking about student loan debt relief at Madison Area Technical College in Madison, Wisc., on Monday.

Andrew Caballero-Reynolds / AFP via Getty Images

This week President Biden took his campaign to save his embattled presidency to Madison, Wisc., the capital of a state he is counting on winning in November.

The capital, sometimes known as “Mad City,” is also home to the flagship campus of the University of Wisconsin, the largest college in the state. Beyond the state government and education establishment, Madison has become a magnet for white collar occupations and a hard place for many recent UW graduates to leave.

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Given the recent voting proclivities of younger voters and especially those who are current or recent college graduates, Madison and surrounding Dane County should be a trove of votes for Democrats. And indeed, they are.

Historically, Democrats have counted on running up big margins in industrial Milwaukee County, long a stronghold of organized labor and the state’s most populous county. Dane and a few other populous counties were counted on in supporting roles. If a Democrat was to win statewide, these polities had to counterbalance the strong Republican leanings of the state’s more affluent suburbs and farm towns.

But in recent elections, Dane has stepped out to sing lead. It is the quintessential example of a college-and-government population center that has become more than a trove of Democratic votes. It has become a defining feature of the party identity. It is not much of an exaggeration, if it is one at all, that college towns are to the Democrats today what factory towns were through most of the 20th century.

College towns take the lead

In 2020, for example, Biden carried Milwaukee County by about 183,000 votes over Trump out of about 451,000 votes cast. But he had an almost equal bulge in actual votes in Dane County, where he managed 181,000 votes over Trump out of a far smaller total of about 338,000 votes cast.

In midterm elections, such as 2018 and 2022, the role of Dane County’s Democratic turnout has been even more dominant. And the same was true when Wisconsin elected a liberal state supreme court justice in 2023, making it possible to restore abortion rights and throw out Republican-drawn maps for state legislative districts.

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So it made sense for Biden to be in Madison if he hopes to keep Wisconsin in his column this fall. And it is hard to overstate the importance of doing so for the president. In 2020 he managed just 49.6 percent of the statewide vote, but it was better than the 46.9 percent Hillary Clinton had in the state in 2016 and just enough to shade then-incumbent President Donald Trump who had 48.9 percent. Trump was only 20,000 votes behind.

Clinton’s 2016 loss in Wisconsin had become for some the emblem of her fatal weakness in the Great Lakes region. Michigan and Pennsylvania also fell out of the “Blue Wall” that year after voting Democratic for president every year since 1992 – even when the Democratic candidate was losing nationally.

But somehow Wisconsin seemed the unkindest cut of all. Polls there had shown Clinton’s lead well beyond the margin of error. And Wisconsin had been voting Democratic even longer than the others, all the way back to 1988. Confident of Wisconsin, the Clinton campaign did not return for events in the state after the primary.

So this past week Biden was wooing Wisconsin, but also pitching a more specific target just as crucial to his reelection. He was not only speaking in a college town, he was speaking directly to current and recent students. And he brought some beef in his message, promising a renewed push to grant student debt relief in the billions of dollars.

Pandering or just politics?

The promise of such generous student debt relief was dismissed as pandering by some, but in politics there are rarely any points given for subtlety. And before the week was over, Biden was reaching out to the same general demographic target. He promised to close the “gun show loophole” by which thousands of guns each year by people who do not undergo background checks before selling the weapons.

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Biden wants gun control supporters’ votes wherever he can find them, of course, but here too younger voters are seen as the key. Gun control ranks just below abortion rights on the list of issues motivating younger potential Democratic voters.

So far, of course, both these Biden initiatives count as virtue signaling more than actual policy making. The debt relief proposal will need to survive court tests, and an earlier Biden effort to cancel debt was spiked by the Supreme Court when the justices decided it needed congressional approval. The gun control measure will also confront Republican resistance and still more tests in federal courts.

But the appeal of student debt relief goes beyond the dollar value itself. It represents the freedom to chart their own direction after college for millions of current or recent students. In that respect it is similar to the ending of the military draft in the 1970s, which freed millions of young men from conscription and contributed to President Richard Nixon’s improved showing among younger voters in his landslide 1972 re-election.

And gun control has an emotional potential that has had electoral impact in the past, at least in the media and at least in the wake of major mass shootings.

Critical parts of coalition

The Biden camp regards younger voters in general and college students in particular to be critical parts of its coalition nationwide, but especially in swing states.

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The Pew Research Center studied survey research results from nearly 12,000 voters whose participation in 2020 was confirmed against registration rolls. The results showed voters under 30 favored Biden over Trump by about 20 points. It was by far his best showing in any age group and notable indeed for the oldest candidate for president ever nominated by a major party. But recent polls of the 2024 Biden-Trump rematch show serious erosion in that dominance.

The day before Biden landed in Madison, Politico was publishing a piece by reporter Steven Shepard on 2024 polls that showed Biden trending down among the young but getting a bit stronger among the old – at least relative to previous Democratic nominees (including himself).

Shepard noted what a reversal this would be from longtime presumptions about the votes of various age groups. He even suggested there could be a problem with the polls themselves. It is also possible that some young people are leaning toward Trump, or at least away from Biden, to show their displeasure with the Democrats’ handling of various issues.

Many activists are distressed at the gradual approach Biden has taken to their issue, be it climate change or gun control or income inequality. Many think he has overcommitted the U.S. to supporting Israel in its war against Hamas.

Of course, not all younger voters are activists committed to these issues. And not all have student debt to be cancelled. The one thing young voters all do have in common is the burden of economic conditions such as inflation. After all, the bout of inflation the U.S. has suffered in the Biden years is younger voters’ first experience of that disheartening economic hardship. The last time inflation was really a voting issue was a generation ago.

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This week, Christian Paz of Vox looked at various 2024 polls released in the past three months. In March 2024 polls alone, Paz wrote, there was “a shift from 2020 among adults under 30 of about 13 points toward Trump, even though Biden still holds an overall advantage [in the demographic] of 11 points in the aggregate.”

Those numbers were no doubt part of the calculus for Biden’s current outreach to younger voters. His trip to Madison was not only sending a signal to younger voters nationwide but responding to the signals he and his campaign have been getting from them.

Biden likes to call college “a ticket to the middle class.” And the recent emphasis on lowering educational barriers and boosting educational borrowers may well reinforce the impression that Democrats mostly care about the educated. That is an argument Republicans are sure to make and stress.

Moreover, even as college towns have emerged as the new base of the Democratic Party, some elements of the workforce and the culture may be forsaking the college paradigm. Campus enrollment numbers have yet to return to pre-pandemic levels. One study measured a drop in total undergraduate enrollment of nearly 6% between the fall of 2019 and the fall of 2023. And there are signs that may well continue.

The Wall Street Journal this month reported on Gen Z becoming “the tool belt generation,” noting its increased interest in skilled trades such as welding and other wage earning occupations. And the resurgence of union organizing and collective bargaining has revived a once common trajectory to a comfortable middle-class life.

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Democrats had shifted away from their heavy dependence on unions in recent decades, but Biden and others have worked to keep those lines of connection active, strongly backing the efforts of the UAW and others.

That may serve the party well as a retro strategy if indeed the U.S. has passed through its “peak college” phase and graduated into a new era.

Copyright 2024 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.



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DOJ weighs in on Line 5 trespass on tribal land in Wisconsin

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DOJ weighs in on Line 5 trespass on tribal land in Wisconsin



Federal government finds trespass is illegal, makes no move to remove pipeline

UPPER PENINSULA — The Enbridge Line 5 pipeline has been found to be illegally trespassing on tribal land in Wisconsin, but will not be moved any time soon.

After years of court arguments, lawsuits and delays, the federal government announced this week that Enbridge is in fact trespassing on land owned by the Bad River Band of Lake Superior Chippewa, but made no move to force the pipeline off the land.

Tribal groups in the Great Lakes region expressed relief that Enbridge’s trespassing is being viewed as a crime after more than 10 years, but are still angry that no move is being made to remove the pipeline.

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The Department of Justice announcement urged the courts to penalize Enbridge for its continued trespassing but also suggested the courts could allow Enbridge to continue trespassing illegally.

“Today, the United States agreed that Enbridge’s ongoing occupation of our land is illegal. We are grateful the U.S. urged the court not to let Enbridge profit from its unlawful trespass,” said Bad River Band Chairman Robert Blanchard in a statement. “But we are disappointed that the U.S. has not unequivocally called for an immediate end to Enbridge’s ongoing trespass, as justice and the law demand. Enbridge should be required to promptly leave our reservation, just like other companies that have trespassed on tribal land. We are hopeful that the appeals court will put an end to Enbridge’s shameful decade of trespass and not condone its exploitation of our land and sovereign rights.”

Built in 1953, Enbridge Energy’s Line 5 spans 645 miles from Superior, Wisconsin to Sarnia, Ontario. The line transports light crude oil and natural gas liquids. Four miles of the pipeline — consisting of two, 20-inch pipelines — crosses through the Straits of Mackinac. 

Line 5’s continued presence in the Straits of Mackinac has sparked serious concern from environmental groups and other advocates about the devastating risk of rupture. On the other side, proponents of the pipeline point to the economic impact and need for fuel transportation.

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More: As legal sparring continues, Army Corps pushes Line 5 permit timeline to 2025

All 12 of Michigan’s federally recognized tribes, as well as tribes in Wisconsin, Minnesota and Canada, have passed resolutions calling for the decommissioning of Line 5.

While tribal communities express concerns about a possible oil spill and potential ecological harm, the Great Lakes are also significant in the creation stories of the Anishinaabe tribes.

On March 21, Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel delivered oral arguments at the Sixth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals in an attempt to bring the Line 5 decommission lawsuit back to the state of Michigan.

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The Nessel vs. Enbridge lawsuit was originally filed in 2019 in Michigan, arguing that the 1836 Treaty of Washington guarantees these tribes the right to maintain their way of life in the ceded territory — a right, they claim, that will be destroyed if an oil spill from the pipeline contaminates the waters.

“We expect a fair trial that upholds the promises the United States government made to our ancestors,” said Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians Chairman Austin Lowes. “We are going to present the facts behind our case and will never stop standing up for our rights as Indigenous people and the sovereignty of our nation.”

Enbridge has successfully delayed the case multiple times and had it removed from state to federal court.

“If the United States supports Enbridge, it would destroy not only both tribal sovereignty but also state sovereignty with respect to the ability to manage land, resources and water for their citizens,” said Bay Mills Indian Community President Whitney Gravelle.

Lowes added that “Our treaty with the United States government predates any treaty that Enbridge is using in an attempt to justify its illegal pipeline operations.”

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“Our case isn’t just about whether Enbridge can continue operating Line 5, but it could impact every federally recognized tribe’s right to control what happens on their land,” he said.

The Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals requested federal input in December 2023. After this, in early March, leaders of 30 Tribal Nations in the Great Lakes region sent a letter to President Joe Biden urging the United States to take action against Line 5’s trespass on the Bad River Band’s sovereign territories.

The Biden Administration has not responded to either request.

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More than 60 Tribal Nations supported Nessel in a motion to bring the case back to state court. The arguments for keeping the case in federal court or moving it back to state court were heard during the March 21 hearings at the Sixth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals in Cincinnati.

Nessel maintains that this case belongs in state court based on Michigan’s sovereign responsibility to protect the public trust in the waters of the Great Lakes. She argued to the court that taking the case out of state court because Enbridge prefers a federal forum violates Michigan’s right to have state claims resolved in state court.

“The case law regarding a Tribal Nation’s sovereign right to maintain their homelands and thus their reservations is a core aspect of tribal sovereignty and any position to the contrary would be unexpected and shocking,” said Gravelle.

Assistant Attorney General Dan Bock argued to the Sixth Circuit that by waiting more than two years to move the case to federal court, Enbridge’s removal was untimely and must be rejected. Bock also argued that, timing issues aside, the federal court misapplied the law when it ruled that the case belongs in federal court rather than state court.

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Enbridge’s attorney Alice Loughran argued that the removal to federal court was timely, and it should remain in federal court because federal issues dominate the case. Those issues include the impact of the 1977 U.S.-Canada transnational pipelines treaty, the federal Submerged Lands Act and the extensive federal regulation of oil pipelines.

Enbridge argued that the state’s rights to protect the waters of the Great Lakes and the company’s right to protect commerce profits are federal issues.

The arguments were presented to a three-judge panel of the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeal: Judges Richard Griffin, Amul Thapar and John Nalbandian.

On April 9, the Department of Justice weighed in on the appeal and came to a final decision that Enbridge is illegally trespassing. Though it acknowledges the trespassing, it does not call for immediate removal and even suggested the courts could allow the trespassing to continue indefinitely.

Many tribal groups spoke out about the dangers of such a decision, as it continues to threaten both environmental safety in the area and tribal sovereignty.

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“The filing leaves more questions than answers. It also leaves Bad River, other Tribal Nations throughout the region, and the 40 million people that rely on the Great Lakes at risk of a catastrophic spill. We fear it will take Line 5 failing again, and the disaster of an oil spill for our position to be taken seriously. This isn’t just about tribes, it is about clean water, it is about life. It is about every U.S. citizen and preserving our natural resources for generations to come,” said Gravelle.

Requests for comment from Enbridge were not returned.

— Contact Brendan Wiesner: BWiesner@Sooeveningnews.com



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Seward County Sheriff’s Office arrests Wisconsin woman for cocaine possession

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Seward County Sheriff’s Office arrests Wisconsin woman for cocaine possession


SEWARD COUNTY, Neb. (KOLN) – The Seward County Sheriff’s Office arrested a Wisconsin woman for drug possession on Tuesday.

According to the sheriff’s office, a deputy with the Seward County Interdiction Task Force pulled over a Dodge Caravan for a traffic violation on I-80 eastbound, north of Pleasant Dale. During the traffic stop, the deputy became suspicious of the driver being involved in criminal activity.

A K9 was deployed for an exterior sniff of the van, which resulted in a probable cause search. During the search, the sheriff’s office said a deputy located 4 kilograms of a substance which later tested positive for cocaine.

The sheriff’s office said 44-year-old Jan M. Schoening of Sheboygan, Wis. was taken into custody without incident. Schoening was charged with possession of a controlled substance with intent to deliver and additional drug charges. Schoening was remanded to the Seward County Detention Center pending further court action.

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