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Grand Farm opens new building aiming to put North Dakota at the forefront of agriculture innovation

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Grand Farm opens new building aiming to put North Dakota at the forefront of agriculture innovation


CASSELTON, N.D. — Grand Farm hosted the grand opening of their new Innovation Campus shop west of Casselton, North Dakota, on June 10.

Elected officials, agricultural industry and business leaders came together for the opening to celebrate what was the culmination of years of hard work between a number of groups and organizations.

“This is a partnership like none other in the world of precision agriculture,” U.S. Sen. John Hoeven R-ND said. “Without a doubt North Dakota is leading this country, the world, really in precision agriculture.”

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John Hoeven

Hoeven also announced at the opening that this summer he will hold a field hearing of the Senate Agriculture Appropriations Committee at the

Grand Farm Innovation Campus

.

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“It’s not only because we want to continue to shine a light on exactly what we’re doing here, but also because we’ve got a lot of people that want to come find out about what they’ve heard about,” Hoeven said. “This is really the future of agriculture in so many ways and that’s why so many people want to be a part of it and why they’re so excited about it.”

For Dennis Kemmesat, CEO of Frontier Precision, Grand Farm will help provide them easier access with growers to provide them with solutions for problems on the farm.

DennisKemmesat.jpg

Dennis Kemmesat, CEO of Frontier Precision.

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“Being able to showcase the really advanced technology out here that growers are going to need in the future to be productive and be profitable, I think that’s the most exciting part about it, because there’s not really one place that can showcase all of this technology,” Kemmesat said.

Frontier Precision is a Bismarck, North Dakota, based company that has been in the drone space around the last 10 years and entered the precision agriculture industry around a year and a half ago. Kemmesat said that as a North Dakota-based company, it was a natural fit to join in on the Grand Farm venture and he is excited to see what the future holds.

Drone

Frontier Precision demonstrated some of their drone technologies on site as part of the grand opening of the new building on Grand Farm’s Innovation Campus.

Kennedy Tesch / Agweek

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“We wanted to be part of being a sponsor and help grow that community,” Kemmesat said. “This was really an easy fit for us to be involved with and the ag side is something more new to us, but we’re excited to be in it.”

Grand Farm is also led by a grower advisory board which features a number of growers around the state who will help provide insight on the challenges, needs and issues facing producers in agriculture.

Kyle Courtney is a fifth-generation farmer from Oakes, North Dakota, where he grows corn, soybeans and wheat. Courtney is one of 11 producers serving on the grower advisory board.

KyleCourtney

Kyle Courtney, a corn, soybean and wheat producer near Oakes, North Dakota, will serve as one of 11 growers on the Grower Advisory Board for Grand Farm.

Kennedy Tesch / Agweek

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“It’s a group of us farmers that get together on a quarterly basis to sit down with them and then explain our problems that we’re seeing in the field,” Courtney said. “They use their connections and reach out to people in the technology department, whether it’s universities, startups — that entire ecosystem, and explain the problems that we have as producers and try to figure out solutions to what we are running across.”

Courtney believes some of the biggest challenges he sees as a producer are herbicide resistance and the lack of trained labor, which both are issues being tackled by Grand Farm and he believes the new addition of the building to the campus “is going to be a huge ramp up for their game.”

“It’s great that they’re starting to work with these technologies before they become mainstream. Producers come out and see Grand Farm, what they’re building, and look at these technologies in the field to see if it will work for their operation,” Courtney said. “I think that’s an invaluable aspect and it gives us a glimpse around the corner to see what’s coming so we can prepare operations for those types of situations or for those technologies that are coming down the pipeline.”

The Grand Farm event served as a kickoff for

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AgTech Week

, an agriculture and technology focused week hosted by a group of organizations in Fargo.

Kennedy is a reporter for Agweek based out of South Dakota. She grew up on an organic crop farm where her family also raises cattle in eastern South Dakota. She graduated from South Dakota State University in 2023 with a major in agricultural communication and minor in agricultural business. She enjoys connecting with producers and agribusinesses across the region while reporting on all things agriculture.





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North Dakota

NOEM DISCUSSES SOUTH DAKOTA RESPONSE TO RECORD FLOODING – KSCJ 1360

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NOEM DISCUSSES SOUTH DAKOTA RESPONSE TO RECORD FLOODING – KSCJ 1360


SOUTH DAKOTA GOVERNOR KRISTI NOEM AND SEVERAL STATE OFFICIALS HELD A NEWS CONFERENCE SUNDAY AFTERNOON IN NORTH SIOUX CITY TO DISCUSS THE FLOODING IN SOUTHEAST SOUTH DAKOTA.

NOEM SAYS WHILE THE MISSOURI RIVER IS A CONCERN, IT’S ALL OF THE OTHER RIVERS, CREEKS AND STREAMS THAT ARE FUELING THE FLOODING AS THEY FLOW INTO THE MISSOURI RIVER:


HIWATER3 OC………IMPACTING THE MISSOURI RIVER. :25

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GOVERNOR NOEM SAYS THAT’S ALSO MADE IT DIFFICULT TO FORECAST WHEN RIVERS WILL CREST AND HOW HIGH THEY WILL RISE:

HIWATER4 OC………..YESTERDAY MORNING. :26

IT’S NO SURPRISE SEVERAL RECORDS HAVE BEEN SET BY THE FLOODING RIVER LEVELS:

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HIWATER5 OC………THAT WE’RE FACING. :28

NOEM SAYS ONE FLOOD RELATED DEATH HAS OCCURRED IN SOUTH DAKOTA, BUT SHE DID NOT SHARE SPECIFIC DETAILS ABOUT IT.

Previous articleSIOUX CITY POLICE SEARCH FOR KEY CLUB SHOOTING SUSPECT
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WATCH LIVE: South Dakota Gov. Noem holding press conference in North Sioux City

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WATCH LIVE: South Dakota Gov. Noem holding press conference in North Sioux City


NORTH SIOUX CITY, S.D. (KCAU) — South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem will be holding a press conference in North Sioux City Sunday afternoon.

A release from the governor’s office says the press conference is to “provide an update on storms and flooding across South Dakota.”

It is scheduled to start at 2:30 p.m.

This is a developing story. KCAU 9 will update as we learn more.

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The great 1932 balloon race

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The great 1932 balloon race


The 1932 National Balloon Race started on Memorial Day from Omaha, Nebraska.

We can assume the wind was from the south because three of the six competitors in the race crashed in North Dakota.

One of the balloons, an entry sponsored by the Chevrolet Motor Co., crashed on the J.A. Michel farm about 4 miles south of Jamestown.

Winds weren’t the only problem the two-man crews, referring to themselves as “balloonitics,” faced during the flight. Heavy rain and thunderstorms made flying treacherous.

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Technology really wasn’t on their side, either. The balloons had a 250-foot rope hanging below the basket. If the rope was dragging, your altitude was less than 250 feet.

The crew “dragged rope” about 50 miles and managed to avoid the James River Valley near Ypsilanti before venting the helium and attempting a controlled landing.

Even deflated, the balloon was a huge sail in the wind above the gondola. As the assembly settled to what was evidently a plowed farm field, the wind pushed everything along, dragging the basket and “nearly filling it full of your North Dakota gumbo,” according to the pilot.

No one was injured in the crash near Jamestown or the crash near Sherwood.

A similar crash near Bismarck left the balloonitics cut and bruised after the basket caught on a barbed wire fence as it was dragged across the ground.

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The winning balloon crossed North Dakota and landed in Saskatchewan. The pilot reportedly reduced altitude to a point where he could yell at people on the ground to find out where he was.

Author Keith Norman can be reached at

www.KeithNormanBooks.com





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