Connect with us

North Dakota

Grand Farm opens new building aiming to put North Dakota at forefront of agriculture innovation

Published

on

Grand Farm opens new building aiming to put North Dakota at forefront of agriculture innovation


CASSELTON, N.D. — Grand Farm hosted the grand opening of their new Innovation Campus shop west of Casselton, North Dakota, on Monday, June 10.

Elected officials, agricultural industry and business leaders came together for the opening to celebrate the culmination of years of hard work between a number of groups and organizations.

“This is a partnership like none other in the world of precision agriculture,” U.S. Sen. John Hoeven R-ND said. “Without a doubt, North Dakota is leading this country, the world, really in precision agriculture.”

Advertisement

John Hoeven

Hoeven also announced at the opening that this summer, he will hold a field hearing of the Senate Agriculture Appropriations Committee at the

Grand Farm Innovation Campus

.

Advertisement

“It’s not only because we want to continue to shine a light on exactly what we’re doing here, but also because we’ve got a lot of people that want to come find out about what they’ve heard about,” Hoeven said. “This is really the future of agriculture in so many ways and that’s why so many people want to be a part of it and why they’re so excited about it.”

For Dennis Kemmesat, CEO of Frontier Precision, Grand Farm will help provide them easier access with growers to provide them with solutions for problems on the farm.

DennisKemmesat.jpg

Dennis Kemmesat, CEO of Frontier Precision.

Contributed

Advertisement

“Being able to showcase the really advanced technology out here that growers are going to need in the future to be productive and be profitable, I think that’s the most exciting part about it, because there’s not really one place that can showcase all of this technology,” Kemmesat said.

Frontier Precision is a Bismarck, North Dakota, based company that has been in the drone space around the last 10 years and entered the precision agriculture industry around a year and a half ago. Kemmesat said that as a North Dakota-based company, it was a natural fit to join in on the Grand Farm venture and he is excited to see what the future holds.

Drone

Frontier Precision demonstrated some of their drone technologies on site as part of the grand opening of the new building on Grand Farm’s Innovation Campus.

Kennedy Tesch / Agweek

Advertisement

“We wanted to be part of being a sponsor and help grow that community,” Kemmesat said. “This was really an easy fit for us to be involved with and the ag side is something more new to us, but we’re excited to be in it.”

Grand Farm is also led by a grower advisory board which features a number of growers around the state who will help provide insight into the challenges, needs and issues facing producers in agriculture.

Kyle Courtney is a fifth-generation farmer from Oakes, North Dakota, where he grows corn, soybeans and wheat. Courtney is one of 11 producers serving on the grower advisory board.

KyleCourtney

Kyle Courtney, a corn, soybean and wheat producer near Oakes, North Dakota, will serve as one of 11 growers on the Grower Advisory Board for Grand Farm.

Kennedy Tesch / Agweek

Advertisement

“It’s a group of us farmers that get together on a quarterly basis to sit down with them and then explain our problems that we’re seeing in the field,” Courtney said. “They use their connections and reach out to people in the technology department, whether it’s universities, startups — that entire ecosystem, and explain the problems that we have as producers and try to figure out solutions to what we are running across.”

Courtney believes some of the biggest challenges he sees as a producer are herbicide resistance and trained labor, which are both issues being tackled by Grand Farm and he believes the new addition of the building to the campus “is going to be a huge ramp up for their game.”

“It’s great that they’re starting to work with these technologies before they become mainstream. Producers come out and see Grand Farm, what they’re building, and look at these technologies in the field to see if it will work for their operation,” Courtney said. “I think that’s an invaluable aspect and it gives us a glimpse around the corner to see what’s coming so we can prepare operations for those types of situations or for those technologies that are coming down the pipeline.”

The Grand Farm event served as a kickoff for

Advertisement

AgTech Week

, an agriculture and technology focused week hosted by a group of organizations in Fargo.

Kennedy is a reporter for Agweek based out of South Dakota. She grew up on an organic crop farm where her family also raises cattle in eastern South Dakota. She graduated from South Dakota State University in 2023 with a major in agricultural communication and minor in agricultural business. She enjoys connecting with producers and agribusinesses across the region while reporting on all things agriculture.





Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

North Dakota

North Dakota Outdoors: Chronic wasting disease fatal if left unchecked

Published

on

North Dakota Outdoors: Chronic wasting disease fatal  if left unchecked


Submitted Photo
Chronic wasting disease is a fatal disease of deer, moose and elk that can cause long-term population declines if left unchecked. Photo from NDGF.

Even if you don’t hunt, I hope you’ve at least heard about chronic wasting disease. If you haven’t, let’s start today.

Chronic wasting disease is a fatal disease of deer, moose and elk that can cause long-term population declines if left unchecked. There is no treatment or cure, and once established in an area, it remains indefinitely. For these reasons, CWD poses a major threat to North Dakota deer, elk and moose and the future of hunting these animals.

Advertisement

Combating CWD is a long-term endeavor that requires committed, diligent effort from all North Dakotans who value these big game animals. Through our cooperative dedication to the cause, we can protect these important species and North Dakota’s hunting heritage.

A deer with CWD will only begin to look sick in the late stages of the disease, several months after it has been infected. Most positive deer found in North Dakota appeared healthy when they were harvested. The only way to determine if your animal is infected with CWD is by getting it tested. Testing information is also critical for determining the distribution of CWD and evaluating the success of the Department’s management strategy.

With the 2023 chronic wasting disease surveillance season completed, the North Dakota Game and Fish Department reported 11 deer tested positive.

“The good news is that all these cases came from units where CWD has already been detected. None came from the southeastern part of the state where we were focusing our surveillance efforts,” said Dr. Charlie Bahnson, department wildlife veterinarian. “However, CWD was detected right across our border in eastern Manitoba near Winkler, and again near Climax, Minn., where it was first found in 2021.”

Positive cases detected in 2023 came from units 3A1, 3A2, 3E1, 3E2 and 3F2.

Advertisement

Casey Anderson, department wildlife division chief, said that despite lower harvest success, the department met its surveillance goal in units 2B, 2G and 2G1. The objective is to achieve a sampling goal of 10% of the allocated deer gun licenses for a given year.

Game and Fish will use its 2023 surveillance data to guide CWD management moving forward.

Today’s breaking news and more in your inbox



Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading

North Dakota

North Dakota Job Service offers resume and interview workshops

Published

on

North Dakota Job Service offers resume and interview workshops


BISMARCK, N.D. (KFYR) – With high school and college graduation in the rearview mirror for the classes of 2024, it’s time to get ready for college or prepare for the job market.

Finding a job after graduation can be difficult, but learning how to sell yourself can help you stand out. One North Dakota company that provides this training is the Workforce Center through North Dakota Job Service.

“Every Wednesday, we have different workshops throughout the morning that you can attend, one of them specifically on interviews, one of them specifically on doing resumes. We also have a transferable skills one, so individuals that may be looking to change into a different occupation, we would be able to help look at what your skill sets are and how they apply to other occupations,” said Amy Arenz, the Bismarck Workforce Center manager for North Dakota Job Service.

Industries projected to be seeking many new employees in the coming years are construction, healthcare, transportation and information technology.

Advertisement



Source link

Continue Reading

North Dakota

Discover North Dakota's Coolest Secret Hidden Gem

Published

on

Discover North Dakota's Coolest Secret Hidden Gem


Readers Digest, you know the little magazine that used to be found in nearly every dentist’s or doctor’s waiting rooms, just came out with “The Coolest Hidden Gem” in each state.

Hmmm, what could it be?  If it’s secret, it’s got to be something that very few people know about right?  The scenic brides around Valley City, the Pembina Gorge, the Turtle Mountains, the James River Valley, the Turtle River State Park, Huff Hills, Lake Audubon, and all of its islands?

Let’s just say their secret spot for North Dakota is NOT so secret to us North Dakotans. 

In fact, it’s kind of ridiculous.  It’s so well known, it’s international.  If somebody I knew came from out of town to visit, this would be one of the first places I would bring them.

Advertisement

According to Readers Digest, “The Coolest Secret Location Spot in North Dakota” is “The International Peace Garden in Rollette County.”

The garden offers a variety of outdoor activities including canoeing, camping, cycling, and various winter activities.  Readers Digest says the chapel is one of the most unique parts of this experience.  The garden is open daily.

So, how about our neighboring states around North Dakota?  What is their coolest secret hidden gem?

Minnesota: Spam Museum in Austin- If you’ve never heard of this before, don’t feel bad.  Neither have I, and I’ve spent a lot of time in Minnesota in my lifetime.  I’ve just never been a big fan of “Spam” before.  Mainly because we were forced to eat it as kids growing up.

Yes, there is a SPAM Museum and it’s free to tour! Located about 100 miles south of Minneapolis in the city of Austin, there’s even a gift shop on your way out if you feel like “piggin’ out”.

Advertisement

Google Maps Screenshot

Google Maps Screenshot

 

South Dakota:  Deadwood-Again, not so secret, but at least not as bad as the International Peace Garden.  Deadwood is a big favorite for people around the Capital Region. It’s such a gorgeous area with so much to do in all four seasons of the year.

Deadwood is where Wild Bill Hickock was shot in the back while playing cards and it’s also where Calamity Jane is buried.

Historic Deadwood Facebook

Advertisement
Historic Deadwood Facebook

 

Montana:  Havre Beneath The Streets-I can think of literally dozens of other more scenic hidden gems in Montana, but Readers Digest chose Havre, Montana.  Apparently, a fire destroyed most of the town at one time, so business owners went underground with their shops.

Tours are available daily, except they do not operate on Sundays during the winter.

Google Maps Screenshot

Google Maps Screenshot

Summer’s here and now you have your hidden gems to explore.  You better get going.  Summer is short in our part of the country.

Advertisement

North Dakota’s Top 11 Lakes According To Our Fans

LOOK: 25 must-visit hidden gems from across the US

From secret gardens to underground caves, Stacker compiled a list of 25 must-visit hidden gems from across the United States using travel guides, news articles, and company websites.

Gallery Credit: Abby Monteil





Source link

Continue Reading

Trending