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Cincinnati Basketball: Bearcats aim to bounce back against 10th ranked Iowa State

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Cincinnati Basketball: Bearcats aim to bounce back against 10th ranked Iowa State


Coming off a narrow loss last weekend, the Cincinnati Bearcats will aim to bounce back against the 10th ranked Iowa State Cyclones tonight!

During the most recent matchup with the new Big 12 opponent, Cincinnati secured a 55-54 overtime win at Iowa State on December 1, 2016.

It will be important for the Bearcats to avoid another slow start and limit Iowa State duo Tre King and Keshon Gilbert from finding success.

Wes Miller’s team should have an opportunity to pick up a crucial victory over Big 12 contender Iowa State but it certainly won’t be easy.

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Cincinnati Basketball: Bearcats aim to bounce back against 10th ranked Iowa State

Cincinnati fell to 15-8 following a 67-62 loss to rival Houston, while Iowa State improved to 18-5 with a 71-59 win over TCU on Saturday.

Miller looked ahead to the Bearcats meeting with Iowa State as Big 12 play continues in a recent press conference via Cincinnati Athletics.

“This team is tough and capable. It’s another opportunity on Tuesday night. We have to try to respond to the things that we didn’t do well.”

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The latest odds from FanDuel Sportsbook has the Bearcats projected as 1.5-point favorites with the over/under placed at 136.5 total points.

Next. Cincinnati Basketball: Houston outlasts the Bearcats in pivotal Big 12 matchup. Cincinnati Basketball: Houston outlasts the Bearcats in pivotal Big 12 matchup. dark





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Iowa

IOWA SPLITS ROCKFORD SERIES, DROPS 3-1 DECISION | Iowa Wild

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IOWA SPLITS ROCKFORD SERIES, DROPS 3-1 DECISION  | Iowa Wild


Feb 21, 2024

GAME REPORT

DES MOINES, Iowa – The Iowa Wild split a weekday pair of games against the Rockford IceHogs with a 3-1 defeat at Wells Fargo Arena on Wednesday night. Adam Raska scored Iowa’s lone goal. 

Michal Teply opened the scoring for the IceHogs at 8:04 of the first period. Josh Maniscalco found Teply in the high slot for a low shot through Jesper Wallstedt (22 saves).  

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Rockford outshot Iowa 14-5 in the opening 20 minutes and carried a 1-0 lead into the first intermission.  

Mike Hardman widened the advantage to two goals 4:23 into the middle frame when Maniscalco found him on the backdoor off the rush. 

Rockford outshot Iowa 22-13 through two periods and held a 2-0 lead after 40 minutes. 

Raska pulled Iowa within a goal with 7:11 to play. After Kevin Conley sent the puck up to the point, Carson Lambos fired a shot into traffic that deflected off the skate of Raska and past Jaxson Stauber (23 saves).  

Iowa pushed to tie the game in the waning minutes, but Jalen Luypen scored on the empty net with six seconds to play.  

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Rockford outshot Iowa 25-24. The Wild were 0-for-1 with the man advantage and held the IceHogs scoreless on two power plays.  

Iowa heads to BMO Center for a rematch with Rockford on Saturday, Feb. 24 at 7 p.m. 

For more information on Iowa Wild hockey, please visit www.iowawild.com. Fans can purchase single-game tickets through the team’s website at www.iowawild.com. Group tickets (10 or more), suites, Wild 365 memberships or premium tickets can be purchased by contacting the Iowa Wild Ticket Department at 515-564-8700 or tickets@iowawild.com. Season tickets for 2023-24 are on sale now. Fans can purchase season tickets for the upcoming season at https://www.iowawild.com/wild-365. 

Visit http://www.iowawild.com/pressbox for the latest news and information from the team including press releases, game notes, multimedia content, and daily statistics.   

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Group that sued over transgender policy gets $20,000 settlement from Iowa school district

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Group that sued over transgender policy gets $20,000 settlement from Iowa school district


MARION — An Iowa school board has reached an agreement resolving a lawsuit over a now-rescinded district policy that allowed students to request a gender support plan to begin socially transitioning at school without requiring the permission of their parents.

Linn-Mar Community Schools’ insurance company will pay the plaintiffs, Parents Defending Education, $20,000, the Gazette newspaper in Cedar Rapids reported. The district announced the agreement Tuesday.

Issues related to transgender students are contentious in many school districts. The American Federation of Teachers said candidates publicly endorsed by conservative groups such as Moms for Liberty and the 1776 Project lost about 70% of their races nationally in elections in November — a tally those groups disputed.

The Linn-Mar board in Marion adopted a policy in April 2022 that, among other things, gave students access to restrooms, locker rooms and changing areas that corresponded with their gender identity.

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The policy became a national political topic in February 2023, drawing criticism from former Vice President Mike Pence, who later announced a bid for the Republican presidential nomination before dropping out in October before then Iowa Caucuses.

“The strength of our nation is tied to the strength of our families, and we cannot stand idly by as the radical left attempts to indoctrinate our children behind parents’ backs,” Pence said in a statement provided at the time.

As Iowa lawmakers debated limits on district transgender policies, the Linn-Mar board in March rescinded its policy. State law now prohibits districts from knowingly giving “false or misleading information to a parent or guardian of their child’s gender identity or intention to transition” to a gender other than the one listed on the birth certificate.

Though three candidates supported by Moms for Liberty were defeated in the Linn-Mar district in November, the district’s statement said the board “believes the time and resources of the district are better spent looking forward than continuing to defend a lawsuit about a policy that has not been in effect for nearly a year.”

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Religious freedom laws limit government, but they’ve been twisted to enable discrimination

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Religious freedom laws limit government, but they’ve been twisted to enable discrimination



The protection of religious freedom should never provide a privilege for my rights to place a barrier in front of you and your rights, or cause you harm.

Religious freedom is one of our country’s most fundamental rights. Religious freedom is also already protected through the First Amendment as well as our state’s constitution. Also important is the rule of law.

Religious exemptions (commonly referred to as RFRA) has been passed by Iowa Senate Republicans. There are major concerns with the legislation, even among some Republicans. 

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RFRA would allow people to pick and choose which laws they follow and which they choose to skirt around under the guise of religious freedom. RFRA would also codify discrimination into Iowa law.

The Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA), as originally passed by Congress in 1993 with bipartisan support, was designed to protect the people from the government imposing its will on an individual’s religious freedom without a compelling reason. An example often given is the government infringing on the right to perform some type of religious worship, unless there is an important government interest, like public safety.

More: Iowa Senate passes ‘religious freedom’ bill that Democrats call ‘blank check to discriminate’

RFRA has been twisted over the last two decades so that the infringement of rights is one person to another. Some believe religious freedom is at the top of an imaginary Pyramid of Rights, enshrining its place over all other rights. RFRA was never intended to place one person’s religious freedom above the rights of another person, or to impose one person’s religious beliefs on another — as has happened in states across the country.

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The protection of religious freedom should never provide a privilege for my rights to place a barrier in front of you and your rights, or cause you harm. My rights end at the tip of my nose, as has often been said.

RFRA laws in other states are thinly veiled efforts to allow business owners, employers, landlords, and others to discriminate against people who are LGBTQ. They have also been used to hinder access to contraceptive care and to justify child abuse and domestic violence. All in the name of religious freedom.

Our state is at a crossroads. Do we believe that all people are equal, or not? Do we believe that all Iowans are worthy, or do we think some people deserve a second-class citizenship?

Our nation’s history is littered with examples of people’s rights being erased because of religious beliefs and religious freedom. Slavery was justified by religious beliefs, as were Jim Crow laws. Discrimination against Jews and Muslims have been justified time and again by those in the religious majority. Immigrants from an array of countries have faced discrimination couched in religious arguments.

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Religious freedom is a bedrock of our nation, but so is equality. There is a responsibility and accountability of our government and lawmakers to ensure equality and fairness for all, guarding against the misuse of any “right” to harm others.

Religious freedom is a sacred right we all cherish, but it is not without limits. RFRA was passed by Republicans in the Iowa Senate. House Republicans in the House should listen to the still small voice informing their hearts and minds and bury the legislation in a drawer.

It’s quite simple. No person should be allowed to use their faith to impose their beliefs on another person and take away another person’s rights.

All Iowans should have equal access to live, work, shop, and dine and should not face legalized discrimination. The religious freedom of some should not be allowed to create a second-class citizenship for others. 

Lawmakers should reject an agenda shrouded with discrimination and justified by a distorted notion of religious freedom. Lawmakers should work diligently to protect all civil rights and ensure all people are treated equally.

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Connie Ryan is executive director of Interfaith Alliance of Iowa.



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