Connect with us

Indianapolis, IN

This ‘unmatched’ rendition of the national anthem started in Indianapolis and went viral

Published

on

This ‘unmatched’ rendition of the national anthem started in Indianapolis and went viral


The world is talking about a powerful rendition of the U.S. national anthem delivered by an 8-year-old from the Pacers home court in Indianapolis this week.

Star-spangled from head to toe, Kinsley Murray, from the state of Washington, sang before Monday’s game against the Toronto Raptors and drew attention from her passionate performance and patriotic gear.

Video of her singing “The Star-Spangled Banner,” posted by the Pacers Monday on TikTok drew 15 million views.

“The passion. The outfit,” the Pacers post said. “This anthem performance was unmatched.”

Advertisement

Who is viral national anthem singer Kinsley Murray?

But it’s not Kinsley’s  first rodeo when it comes to going viral.

By the time she was six, she’d already sang the U.S. national anthem at more than 100 sporting events, including baseball, football and basketball games and rodeos.

Her performances include those at the Central Washington State Fair in Yakima in September 2021 and a University of Washington men’s basketball game in January 2022, according to social media posts from a user identifying himself as her father, Shafer Murray, an elementary school teacher.

Advertisement

She got attention in 2021 for singing at a Gonzaga women’s basketball game.

 “I love to honor our country,” she told KREM. “The louder the roar, the better I get.”

She’d performed “O Canada” before singing “The Star-Spangled Banner” on Monday at Gainbridge Fieldhouse.

On Tuesday, she sang at the Dayton-Davidson game in Ohio.

Contact IndyStar reporter Cheryl V. Jackson at cheryl.jackson@indystar.com or 317-444-6264. Follow her on X.com:@cherylvjackson.

Advertisement





Source link

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Indianapolis, IN

Indiana did not see an influx of traffic on solar eclipse day like predicted. What happened?

Published

on

Indiana did not see an influx of traffic on solar eclipse day like predicted. What happened?


play

Indiana State Police expected thousands of visitors to view the total solar eclipse. Governor Eric Holcomb even signed and emergency order. But the state didn’t see nearly the number of tourists expected.

The April 8 solar eclipse was predicted to be big day for Indiana tourism, and while in many ways it still was, the crowds were not what local officials predicted.

Advertisement

Here’s what happened during the 2024 total solar eclipse.

Read more from the Herald-Times: Eclipse day was sunny in Indiana. Where were the crowds?

Bloomington’s numbers were lower than expected

Instead of 300,000 spectators, as multiple officials projected, Bloomington saw tens of thousands, according to early estimates, The Herlad-Times reported.

While the smaller-than-expected crowds enabled the city to escape snarled traffic, the overestimates also kept some Bloomington residents from leaving their homes and attending the local events, including those at Switchyard Park and Memorial Stadium.

At the Bloomington Police Department, officers of all ranks were scheduled to work 12-hour shifts. But they were cut to 10 hours as the day progressed and the anticipated crowds failed to appear.

Advertisement

Nashville also saw lower numbers than predicted

Between 50,000 and 100,000 eclipse viewers were expected in Nashville and Brown County, an estimated 20,000 showed up.

Indianapolis saw the most tourists, but still lower than estimated

Indiana State Police told IndyStar in March they were expecting about as much traffic for the eclipse as the city sees for the Indy 500, which can be anywhere from 200,000 to 250,000 visitors.

Clare Clark, senior communications manager for Visit Indy, confirmed that Indianapolis welcomed 125,000 visitors for the eclipse, with representation from all 50 states and 35 countries.

Advertisement

Why was solar eclipse viewing attendance lower than expected?

According to NASA, the path of totality for this year’s eclipse was between 108 and 122 miles wide, or about 72% wider, at the high end, than the eclipse in 2017. This year, about 31.6 million people lived in the path of totality, compared with 12 million in 2017.

The eclipse this year also passed over “more cities and densely populated areas” than in 2017, NASA said.

That meant people had more options as to where to travel, reducing the likelihood of congestion for any particular area.

Several Indiana cities had reported chances of cloud cover during the eclipse, which may have also been a reason less tourists came to Indiana, but neither Indianapolis or Bloomington ended up having any clouds block the view of the solar event.

Advertisement

Schools being closed for the day also helped reduce normal traffic in cities.

Local events, tourism still saw success despite fewer visitors than planned

Despite getting fewer visitors than planned, several cities in the state still saw great success.

Airbnb said Indianapolis was the #1 most booked destination within the path of totality and there was a virtual sell-out of hotel rooms on Sunday night ahead of the eclipse, Visit Indy said.

Visit Indy also broke their record for the most website traffic in a single day on the day of the eclipse, meaning tourists and locals were looking for things to do.

Advertisement

Mike McAfee, executive director of Visit Bloomington, said hotels and short-term rentals were “near capacity,” though he won’t have final data until later this month.

IU spokesman Mark Bode said the university hosted “tens of thousands of visitors and students across at least seven separate events,” including “nearly 10,000” at Memorial Stadium.

Katie Wiseman is a trending news intern at IndyStar. Contact her at klwiseman@gannett.com. Follow her on Twitter @itskatiewiseman.





Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Indianapolis, IN

Andrew Luck makes long-awaited return to Indianapolis: 'It's my turn to give back'

Published

on

Andrew Luck makes long-awaited return to Indianapolis: 'It's my turn to give back'


The last time we saw him in this type of setting — cameras on, microphones hot — Andrew Luck had tape on his ankle and tears in his eyes. He was broken. We were stunned.

This time, almost five years removed, he wore a navy sportscoat and trendy glasses, belting out that hyuk-hyuk-hyuk laugh of his. He admitted how excited he was pulling into the Colts’ facility Friday afternoon, thinking back to where he used to park before practice. He bragged how proud he was that both of his daughters were born in Indianapolis, a city he still loves and feels connected to.

“This place is dope in May,” Luck said. “Nothing compares to the Indy 500.”

He admitted that he had to YouTube some of his old highlights before Friday’s 12th annual ChuckStrong gala in case anyone asked him about that magical 2012 season and what the Colts were able to accomplish — an unexpected playoff berth — while their first-year coach, Chuck Pagano, was stricken with leukemia in the hospital.

Advertisement

This felt like a long time coming, not solely for the city and the franchise that for years felt the reverberations from his stunning retirement, but for the quarterback himself.

The Colts spent the better part of five years trying — and mostly failing — to move on. So did he.

“For me to move forward in my life the way I want to,” Luck said that night, fighting back tears, “it didn’t involve football.”

Back in August 2019, he was battered and beaten-down. He once told me the game — and all the pressure and pain that had come his way — had left him “a sad miserable SOB.” So he walked away and entered the unknown, leaving so many questions unanswered and what-ifs lingering. He was 29 years old, clueless as to what the next phase of life would look like.

He’d joke with himself in the months that followed: “I can’t be retired at 30. That ain’t right.”

Advertisement

No, none of it felt right. And so much of it never made sense.

Finally, in front of the cameras in Indianapolis, he addressed it.

“Football gave me a lot,” Luck said. “Most importantly … the relationships and the experiences with people that I love, like Chuck. I think part of me feels — and I don’t mean this in a cheesy way — but part of me feels like it’s my turn to give back into this game. And this is what feels right at this moment.”

It took time, years to reconcile the way his football career ended, so abruptly, so unexpectedly, 14 days before he was supposed to start his eighth NFL season. “Tormented” is the word he used to describe his emotions back then.

He spilled his soul in a stunning news conference after a preseason game, his voice shaky, his fade red with emotion. Then he disappeared.

Advertisement

He went to Spain and learned to surf. He spent weeks skiing in Colorado. He became a stay-at-home dad. He cooked. He texted his old teammates on game days. He read a mountain of books.

All the while, he pondered what he was going to do with the rest of his life.

What that life looks like now: classes at Stanford, where he’s working on his master’s in education, and fall afternoons on the football field at Palo Alto High School, where he’s a volunteer quarterbacks coach. More than that, he’s a middle-aged dad to two daughters (Lucy is 4, Penelope is 20 months) who’s come to peace with the way his first career ended.

“I am a part of the fabric of the sports story in this city,” Luck admitted. “I certainly feel like Indianapolis is a massive part of the fabric of who I am, and where life has gone.

Advertisement

“I certainly feel the love from this city, and I hope people know it’s reciprocal.”

As he moved through the stages of his retirement, he said, the further he got from football, the more he wanted it back in his life.

“It’s just got to be different,” he decided.

The itch to play again never really entered his mind.

“I think when I retired, that part of it was put to bed, in a very simple, direct (way),” Luck said.

Advertisement

Thus, coaching. And reconnecting with the franchise he for so long seemed distant from — despite the fact that he and his family lived a few minutes from the team’s practice facility.

That Luck laid low early in retirement wasn’t an accident. He never yearned for attention, never really understood it. He wasn’t about to seek it out after his playing days were over.

“I do think we live in — and I think about this often — a world where it’s very easy to create your own visibility, in a sense,” he said. “And that’s just never been me. I don’t think that’s my personality. I’m OK with that. And I’m certainly not searching for attention in that way.”

Which is why this night was notable, with Luck choosing to speak to a handful of reporters before helping Pagano continue his fight against cancer (to date, the ChuckStrong gala has raised $14 million for cancer research). This wasn’t something that was going to happen in 2020 or 2021 or even 2022. Luck wasn’t ready.

Yes, he watches his old team, even though most of his old teammates are retired. He’s a fan of Christian McCaffrey (the Stanford connection) and Jonathan Taylor. He swung by a 49ers game this season, then stopped by the Amazon Prime TV set afterward, amazingly, dressed as Capt. Andrew Luck. He loves taking his daughters to Stanford games.

Advertisement

Anytime Penelope sees a football helmet, she says “Daddy.” That brings a smile to his face. “You’re right,” he’ll tell her.

The ride was riveting, the end gutting, his legacy complicated. Luck has come to acknowledge that, and furthermore, to accept it.

On Friday night, he looked and sounded like a man grateful for what he was a part of, and for the role football played in his life — even if his story never followed the script. Particularly the ending.

“We were not perfect,” he said. “I know I was not perfect. All of us wished we’d had multiple Super Bowls and done things and sort of vanquished some of those enemies that we didn’t quite ever get to.

“But I could probably speak for all the other guys, and I know I could speak for myself: it wasn’t perfect, but we tried our best. We tried our hardest, and I hope we gave folks something to cheer about and something to be proud of.”

Advertisement

(Photo: James Boyd / The Athletic)





Source link

Continue Reading

Indianapolis, IN

Multicultural Spotlight: Black workers in the US private sector

Published

on

Multicultural Spotlight: Black workers in the US private sector


INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) — The economic landscape of Indianapolis is, no doubt, vibrant and bustling, from the nonprofit sector to the commercial and private sectors.

News 8 has been exploring Black representation in the workforce and leadership roles. That pertains, specifically, to the participation of Black workers in the U.S. private sector.

According to a report by McKinsey and Co., a strategy and management consulting firm, an analysis on economic data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and the U.S. Census Bureau from 2019 found that, on the current trajectory, it would take 95 years for Black employees to reach talent parity in the private sector.

“It tells us that (African-Americans) started from a different position,” News 8 contributor Emil Ekiyor said. (African-Americans) didn’t start from the same starting point” as whites.

Advertisement

Ekiyor said when we look at the journey from the Civil Rights Era that “we forget it really hasn’t been that long.”

On accepting different cultures and perspectives in the workplace, Ekiyor said employers must “respect” that people bring different experiences to the table.



Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Trending