Connect with us

Health

Dr. Anna Cabeca: These Are the Superfoods That Help Shrink a Menopause Belly

Published

on

Dr. Anna Cabeca: These Are the Superfoods That Help Shrink a Menopause Belly



Advertisement


Menopause Belly: Doc’s Own Tricks to Burn Fat Faster | Woman’s World
























Advertisement













Advertisement


Use left and right arrow keys to navigate between menu items.


Use escape to exit the menu.

Advertisement
Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Health

Ask a doctor: ‘Is it safe to swim underwater with my eyes open?’

Published

on

Ask a doctor: ‘Is it safe to swim underwater with my eyes open?’

Join Fox News for access to this content

Plus special access to select articles and other premium content with your account – free of charge.

By entering your email and pushing continue, you are agreeing to Fox News’ Terms of Use and Privacy Policy, which includes our Notice of Financial Incentive.

Please enter a valid email address.

Having trouble? Click here.

Hot summer days include plenty of pool or beach time for many people — but it’s important to stay safe while swimming.

While it may be tempting to open your eyes underwater, experts warn that prolonged exposure could put your vision at risk.

Advertisement

Fox News Digital spoke with Brian Boxer Wachler, M.D., an ophthalmologist in Beverly Hills, California, who is also a medical reviewer with All About Vision, an online resource, about what happens when people take a peek while swimming.

ASK A DOCTOR: ‘WHY ARE MY EYES OFTEN BLOODSHOT?’

A quick glance likely won’t be harmful, the expert said — but extended periods of underwater peeping could cause problems.

“Usually when people open their eyes underwater, the [eyes] begin to feel irritated and they will close their eyes pretty quickly,” Wachler said. 

It may be tempting to open your eyes underwater, but experts warn that prolonged exposure could put your vision at risk. (iStock)

Advertisement

When swimming in pool water, the chlorine can irritate the eyes, he warned.

Chlorine can cause damage to the outer layer cells that protect the cornea, Dr. Muriel Schornack, a Mayo Clinic optometrist in Minnesota, stated on the clinic’s website.

NEBRASKA BABY BORN WITH CATARACTS HAS 3 EYE SURGERIES TO SAVE HER SIGHT: ‘I JUST KEPT PRAYING’

As a result, the eye may become red, irritated or sensitive to light, the doctor warned. 

You may also notice blurred vision.

Advertisement
Man swimming underwater

Swimming in saltwater or untreated freshwater can potentially introduce bacteria into the eyes, a doctor said. (iStock)

“A lot of folks who are highly nearsighted or highly farsighted like to wear their contact lenses while they’re swimming — and if chlorine soaks into those lenses, now you’ve got a reservoir of chlorine on the surface of the eye that’s likely to do damage,” Schornack noted on Mayo Clinic’s site.

ASK A DOCTOR: ‘WHY AM I HEARING MY HEARTBEAT IN MY EARS?’

With saltwater or untreated freshwater, the effects can be even harsher, and can potentially introduce bacteria into the eyes, Wachler warned.

blue eye contact lens

For people who wear contacts while swimming, chlorine can soak into the lenses and cause problems, a doctor said. (iStock)

“Microscopic organisms are found in various bodies of water, and can be both beneficial and harmful,” he said.

Bacteria such as E. coli can thrive in contaminated freshwater, while saltwater teems with decomposers like Vibrio, according to the ophthalmologist.

Advertisement

“Viruses like those causing hepatitis A can linger in polluted water,” he said. 

“Protozoa such as Giardia can cause diarrhea if ingested from untreated sources, while molds like Aspergillus may be found in damp areas around freshwater.”

Signs that you should see a doctor

If you’ve been swimming with your eyes open for an extended period, watch out for signs of irritation like redness, itchiness and a burning sensation, Wachler advised. 

Woman swimming

For those who want to look underwater while swimming, experts recommend wearing goggles to protect the eyes.

“You might also experience watery eyes or increased sensitivity to light,” he said. 

Advertisement

“These are usually temporary and go away on their own.”

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR HEALTH NEWSLETTER

If you notice a thicker discharge, have trouble seeing or experience severe pain, it could be a sign of infection and warrants a trip to the doctor.

For more Health articles, visit www.foxnews/health

For those who want to look underwater while swimming, experts recommend wearing goggles to protect the eyes.

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Health

Follow these 9 safe hiking tips to prevent tragedy on the trail

Published

on

Follow these 9 safe hiking tips to prevent tragedy on the trail

Join Fox News for access to this content

Plus special access to select articles and other premium content with your account – free of charge.

By entering your email and pushing continue, you are agreeing to Fox News’ Terms of Use and Privacy Policy, which includes our Notice of Financial Incentive.

Please enter a valid email address.

Having trouble? Click here.

Recent hiking-related deaths have spotlighted the need for safety protocols.

While experts agree that hiking is considered a good form of exercise, they stress the importance of being prepared before heading out on the trail, especially during the hot summer months.

Advertisement

Outdoor enthusiasts shared the following important tips to help prevent hiking hazards.

FIREFIGHTERS CARRY 160-POUND DOG DOWN OREGON MOUNTAIN AFTER PUP IS INJURED ON TRAIL

1. Study the hiking area before your trip

Before heading out on a hike, familiarize yourself with maps, landmarks and any restricted areas or required permits, say trail experts.

Outdoor enthusiasts shared tips to help prevent trail hazards amid a flurry of recent hiking-related deaths this summer. (iStock)

“Research the terrain, trail difficulty, weather conditions and local wildlife,” Joey Coe, a trip leader for Backroads, a California-based travel touring company, told Fox News Digital. 

Advertisement

Coe also suggested saving a photo of the trail map on your phone to reference while hiking.

Although cell phones and mapping apps can be helpful, it is important to have a backup paper map in the event of a lost signal, according to Guy deBrun, a lecturer at the Hart School of Hospitality, Sport & Recreation Management at James Madison University in Virginia. 

WHAT IS A DERECHO? HERE’S A METEOROLOGICAL EXPLANATION AND OTHER INTERESTING FACTS

“Knowledge of how to use a paper map is imperative,” deBrun, who is also an instructor in wilderness first aid, told Fox News Digital in an email.

Hikers should also know the difficulty level of the planned route, according to the American Hiking Society, a nonprofit based in Silver Springs, Maryland. 

Advertisement
Snack on trail

Pack lightweight, high-energy foods such as nuts, dried fruit, energy bars and sandwiches, and avoid bringing perishable items unless you have proper storage, experts said regarding outdoor hikes. (iStock)

“It’s also helpful to identify possible emergency exit points,” Maggie Peikon, manager of communications with the American Hiking Society, told Fox News Digital via email. 

Online forums and trail reviews can also provide valuable information about the terrain, she added.

2. Set a ‘time plan’ for your hike

Whether you are setting off alone or with a group, let someone know your expected time frame for arriving at predetermined spots along the trail, experts recommend.

“Knowledge of how to use a paper map is imperative.”

One approach is to create a “time control plan,” which considers linear distance and elevation. 

Advertisement

A general rule of thumb is to travel two miles per hour, adding one mile for every 1,000 feet of elevation gain. 

“Most novices fail to plan for elevation gain,” deBrun told Fox News Digital.  

TIKTOK TRENDING QUESTION ABOUT ‘BEING STUCK IN A FOREST’ WITH ‘A MAN OR A BEAR’ YIELDS STRATEGIC TIPS

“One thousand feet of elevation gain adds one mile to your total mileage. So, if you are hiking five miles and gaining 2,000 feet, you [should] consider it seven miles. Divide by two miles an hour to estimate your time.”

It is also important to project the amount of daylight you will have during your excursion to avoid returning in the dark if you don’t have the necessary gear to hike at night.

Advertisement

3. Know your limits

It’s best to start small and build, starting with short, easy, well-marked trails that match your fitness level, experts agreed.

“Take breaks as needed, and don’t push too hard,” said Coe. 

Peikon added, “If you’re feeling too tired, or realize you’re not going to make it to your destination within the time frame you prepared for, turn around and err on the side of caution.”

Map and compass

Before heading out on a hike, trail experts recommend familiarizing yourself with maps, landmarks, and any restricted areas or required permits. (iStock)

It’s also important to stay on the trail, she said.

“Avoid taking shortcuts. Getting off the trail for any reason can easily result in becoming directionally disoriented and getting lost.” 

Advertisement

4. Maintain a safe distance when hiking

Aim to keep a distance of at least a few feet between hikers to avoid accidents and allow space for wildlife, experts advised. 

For people hiking in a group, it’s best to avoid taking up the whole trail width, according to the American Hiking Society.

WEAR SUNSCREEN THE RIGHT WAY THIS SUMMER BY UNDERSTANDING SPF AND THE PROPER APPLICATION PROCESS

Hikers going downhill should yield to those going uphill.

Also, be wary of potential poisonous vegetation in that region so you can keep a safe distance and avoid accidental contact, experts cautioned.

Advertisement

5. Prepare for weather conditions

Hikers should consider local weather patterns when deciding what to wear on a hike, experts told Fox News Digital.  

“In many mountainous areas, lightning storms regularly occur in the afternoon,” deBrun said. “Hikers should take this into account.”

Coe recommended dressing in layers to help adjust to changing temperatures. 

“Moisture-wicking, quick-drying materials are best,” he said.

Bear or bug spray

In areas where bears are prevalent, experts suggest packing bear spray to use in the event of an unexpected encounter.  (iStock)

Bring a hat, sunglasses, sunscreen and rain gear, experts advised.

Advertisement

For family hiking trips, it’s important to be aware of children’s body temperature. “If you are carrying a child, he or she may be cold while you are burning up,” Peikon said. 

NEW YORK STATE FISHING RECORD BROKEN WITH SPECIES DATING BACK 100 MILLION YEARS

“Conversely, you may feel chilled while your child is warm from running around and playing.”

If multiple children are on the hike, dress them in bright, visible clothing so you can more easily spot them, Peikon said.

6. Wear comfortable, supportive footwear

Multiple hiking trip leaders suggested wearing sturdy, well-fitted hiking boots with good ankle support. 

Advertisement

“Break them in before your trip to avoid blisters,” Coe cautioned.

Kids hiking

If multiple children are on the hike, dress them in bright, visible clothing so you can more easily spot them, an expert said. (iStock)

Running shoes or trail runners can be appropriate, deBrun said, but hiking boots may be more appropriate in wet or rocky terrain.

7. Bring along essential equipment

Pack a compass or GPS, whistle, flashlight, a basic first aid kit and trekking poles (if needed), said experts.

Teach children to blow the whistle several times in the event they wander away from the group, they also advised. 

Pack a compass or GPS, whistle, flashlight, a basic first aid kit and trekking poles (if needed). 

Advertisement

“Be aware of your group’s medical needs and any potential allergies,” Coe said. 

Hikers might also want to consider taking a wilderness first aid course, he added.

      

In areas where bears are prevalent, experts suggest packing bear spray to use in the event of an unexpected encounter. 

It’s also a good idea to check with local animal experts about how to navigate an encounter with wildlife.

Advertisement

8. Stay fueled and hydrated

Pack lightweight, high-energy foods such as nuts, dried fruit, energy bars and sandwiches, and avoid bringing perishable items unless you have proper storage, experts said.

Couple on a hike

Aim to keep a distance of at least a few feet between hikers to avoid accidents and allow space for wildlife, experts advised.  (iStock)

It is also important to leave no trace of food behind. 

“Carry out all trash and leftover food to avoid attracting wildlife and to prevent littering,” Coe advised.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR HEALTH NEWSLETTER

Packing enough water is essential.

Advertisement

“Bring at least half a liter of water for every hour you plan to be hiking,” Peikon said — even more when hiking in the heat.

Selfie hiking

Selfies can distract hikers from their surroundings, which can increase the risk of falls or cause them to miss a hazard, according to hiking experts.  (iStock)

Very few water sources are safe to drink without purification, deBrun cautioned.

“Research water sources and bring a water purification system for longer hikes,” he said.

9. Use caution with cellphones and selfies

Selfies can distract hikers from their surroundings, which can increase the risk of falls or cause them to miss a hazard, according to hiking experts. 

“It is always tragic to hear of fatalities due to selfies, which does happen every year in U.S. national parks,” Coe told Fox News Digital.  

Advertisement

For more Health articles, visit www.foxnews/health

If you need to use your phone, stop walking and stay aware of your surroundings, he said.

“Use your phone only for emergency calls and navigation as needed,” Coe added.

Continue Reading

Health

The Intermittent Fasting Diet: Is It All It’s Cracked Up to Be? | Woman's World

Published

on

The Intermittent Fasting Diet: Is It All It’s Cracked Up to Be? | Woman's World



Advertisement


The Intermittent Fasting Diet: Is It All It’s Cracked Up to Be? | Woman’s World
































Advertisement





Use left and right arrow keys to navigate between menu items.


Use escape to exit the menu.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending