Connect with us

Fitness

Running for Weight Loss: Dispelling Myths and Unveiling Truths

Published

on

Running for Weight Loss: Dispelling Myths and Unveiling Truths

Running is an activity beloved by many – it’s simple, it’s accessible, and it’s proven to provide numerous health benefits. However, new research suggests that running might not serve as the weight loss silver bullet many of us believe it to be. This doesn’t mean that lacing up your running shoes is in vain. Studies indicate that while running might not be the most potent tool for shedding pounds, it could be a powerful ally in preventing weight gain as we age.

Running: A Strategy to Prevent Weight Gain

A study published in Frontiers in Sports and Active Living reveals that regular running can help keep weight gain at bay as we grow older. The research compared the lean and fat mass of young and older men who engaged in different types of physical activities. The findings suggest that running can help maintain a healthy body composition, emphasizing its role in future health as much as its benefits for the present condition.

The research also suggests that strength training can help preserve muscle mass. Therefore, combining running with strength training activities could provide the maximum long-term physical benefits.

Debunking the Myth: Running and Weight Loss

A study from the University of Jyväskylä challenges the common belief that running does not contribute to weight or fat loss. It reveals that running can aid in preventing weight gain and maintaining lower fat mass levels. The study also emphasizes the benefits of a combined training approach, incorporating resistance exercises for maintaining muscle mass alongside endurance training.

While running can promote weight loss and facilitate the use of stored fat for energy, the study emphasizes the importance of maintaining a balanced diet and integrating a variety of exercises into one’s routine for overall health.

Advertisement

Running Alone Won’t Aid Weight Loss, But it Stops Weight Gain

Further research from the University of Jyväskylä, Finland substantiates that running does not significantly contribute to weight loss but does prevent weight gain in the long term. The study found that lifelong running exercise, whether long distance or sprinting, helps maintain lower fat mass levels compared to a typical physically active lifestyle or competitive strength sports.

Again, the study underscores the effectiveness of strength training in maintaining muscle mass. A combined training approach may be most beneficial for optimizing body composition throughout life.

Running, Diet, and Weight Loss

Bonecollection.com discusses running and weight loss, highlighting the importance of combining running with dietary adjustments for optimal weight loss effects. It explains that weight loss through running hinges on a caloric deficit and provides guidelines for aerobic running to aid in weight control.

It offers a weight loss exercise plan which includes fast walking, jogging, high-intensity interval training, and increasing daily household activity to boost calorie expenditure. The importance of a balanced diet and caloric deficit is emphasized, offering a weekly exercise schedule to achieve the goal of losing three kilograms in a month.

Final Thoughts

Running, while not a magical solution for weight loss, is a valuable strategy for maintaining a healthy body composition and preventing weight gain as we age. Combining running with strength training and a balanced diet can optimize our body composition and overall health. It’s time to lace up those running shoes, not with the sole goal of weight loss, but with a broader perspective of long-term health and wellbeing.

Advertisement
Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Fitness

How hard should you exercise? New research to determine what’s safe and what’s not

Published

on

How hard should you exercise? New research to determine what’s safe and what’s not

It’s the first of its kind for B.C., and it’s going to help fill a cardiovascular research gap in Canada: a new cardiopulmonary exercise test laboratory has opened at UBC Hospital.

“The CPET machine is a core diagnostic tool that can simultaneously look at both the pulmonary and cardiac variables from a health and fitness perspective in individuals while they are exercising, such as heart rate and rhythm, and oxygen consumption,” said Dr. Saul Isserow, Medical Director of SportsCardiologyBC.

In other words, it helps determine how much exercise is safe for people of all ages and fitness abilities.

“Heart disease remains the number one killer in Canada of men and women throughout their life,” he said, adding that the research underway studies a broad spectrum of active people.

“We do see a lot of the younger athletes just to make sure they haven’t got anything they were born with that could put them at risk,” said Isserow, who is also with the Sports Cardiology Department at UBC.

Advertisement

He also said, that for the first time, seniors, even those in their eighties, are wanting to be more physically active than any previous generation.

“Twenty years ago, when you had a heart attack, you’re told at the most, go for a walk now and again. Now, people have a heart attack, they want to go ride the Gran Fondo, run up Cypress Mountain. So we have to study the safety of all that,” he said.

The new lab is funded through donations raised through the VGH & UBC Hospital Foundation. The lab equipment is about $100,000, but another $1 million was raised to cover ongoing operating costs.

About 1,000 people each year will be tested at the new lab. It will take about 12 months to gather initial research on how much exercise is safe.

Isserow said similar research has been done in the US and Europe, but not in Canada.

Advertisement

“We need our own data. We have our own unique population,” he said.

The survival rate in Canada for out-of-hospital cardiac arrests, including on the playing field, the hiking trail or in the gym, is just five per cent.

It’s hoped the work done by the lab will not only fill a research gap, but save lives.

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Fitness

Women Realize More Health Benefits from Exercise than Men, Recent Studies Suggest

Published

on

Women Realize More Health Benefits from Exercise than Men, Recent Studies Suggest

In recent years, health and fitness have become popular topics. However, a new study has shed light on a fascinating discovery that challenges the conventional one-size-fits-all approach to exercise. The research, published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, suggests that women reap more health benefits from regular exercise than men, particularly in reducing the risk of early death and fatal cardiovascular events. This revelation has sparked a conversation about the need for gender-specific exercise guidelines.

The Gender Disparity in Exercise Benefits

A comprehensive study involving 412,413 participants over 20 years found that women who engaged in 140 minutes of moderate aerobic exercise per week experienced an 18% reduction in the risk of premature death. In contrast, men required 300 minutes of similar activity to achieve the same benefit. Further, women who exercised regularly saw a 24% decrease in mortality risk from any cause and a 36% lower risk of fatal heart events. Meanwhile, men who exercised experienced a 15% reduction in the risk of death and a 14% lower risk of fatal heart events.

The research, supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), notes that only 33% of women and 43% of men meet the standard for weekly aerobic exercise, with 20% of women and 28% of men completing a weekly strength training session. The study attributes the differences in outcomes between the genders to variations in anatomy and physiology.

Understanding the Physiological Differences

One theory suggests that women make faster and more significant gains in muscular strength when they work out, contributing to the disparity in benefits observed. The data also reveals that people who are female tend to exercise with less frequency and intensity than those who are male. Additionally, the reduced mortality risk from weekly moderate to vigorous aerobic activity eventually plateaus for both sexes. However, men have to exercise more than twice as long as women to realize the same results.

The Need for Gender-Specific Exercise Guidelines

These findings challenge the current Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, which recommend adults get at least 2.5-5 hours of moderate-intensity exercise or 1.25-2.5 hours of vigorous exercise each week. The study emphasizes the importance of tailored guidelines based on sex, suggesting that a more personalized approach to exercise could be more beneficial.

Advertisement

While the research provides valuable insights, the team cautions that the study is based on self-reported exercise and did not account for physical activity associated with household chores. Despite this, the results highlight the need for further research to understand the impact of gender on exercise benefits fully.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the study presents compelling evidence that women may gain more health benefits from regular exercise than men. This discovery underscores the need for sex-specific exercise guidelines. It’s essential to emphasize that, regardless of gender, regular physical activity remains an effective way to maintain good health and reduce the risk of various diseases. As we continue to unravel the complexities of gender differences in health, it’s clear that a more personalized approach to exercise could pave the way for improved health outcomes for all.

Continue Reading

Fitness

Women Derive Greater Health Benefits from Physical Activity than Men: A Closer Look at the Latest Study

Published

on

Women Derive Greater Health Benefits from Physical Activity than Men: A Closer Look at the Latest Study

A New Study Sheds Light on Sex-Specific Differences in Exercise Benefits

In a major breakthrough, a study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology has found that women derive more health benefits from the same amount of physical activity as men. The comprehensive research examined the association between leisure-time physical activity and all-cause and cardiovascular death in an impressive sample of 412,413 U.S. adults.

The findings indicate striking sex-specific differences in the gains from physical activity, with women experiencing a more pronounced reduction in the risk of all-cause and cardiovascular death. Specifically, the study found that women achieved a 24% reduction in mortality risk, compared to an 18% reduction for men, from equivalent doses of leisure-time physical activity.

The ‘Gender Gap’ in Physical Activity

The study’s results suggest that efforts to close the ‘gender gap’ in physical activity should focus on encouraging especially women to engage in regular leisure-time physical activity. The emphasis on women is due to their greater potential to reduce their mortality risk through physical activity.

Current national guidelines recommend 60 minutes per day of physical activity for children and 150 minutes per week for adults. However, these guidelines may need to be reconsidered in light of the study’s findings, which suggest that women can achieve significant health benefits with less than the currently recommended levels of physical activity.

Exercise and Mortality: The Numbers

According to the study, both men and women achieved a peak survival benefit with 300 minutes of weekly aerobic physical activity. However, women could achieve a similar benefit with just 140 minutes per week. Furthermore, the survival benefit for women continued to increase, reaching a maximum at 300 minutes per week.

Advertisement

The benefits of physical activity extended beyond aerobic exercise. The study’s findings were consistent across all measures of aerobic activity and muscle-strengthening activity, further reinforcing the importance of regular exercise for both men and women.

Biological Differences and Exercise

The study’s authors suggest that there may be biological differences between men and women that affect their response to exercise. For example, known differences in heart size and the blood’s capacity to transport oxygen may influence physical performance and the health benefits derived from exercise.

Interestingly, the study found that women could achieve the same survival benefit as men with just under 2 1/2 hours per week of moderate to vigorous aerobic activity. This suggests that women may be able to derive greater health benefits from less intensive exercise regimes than men.

Implications for Physical Activity Recommendations

These findings have significant implications for physical activity recommendations. They suggest that clinicians may need to consider more tailored recommendations of physical activity, taking into account the sex-specific differences in exercise response. This could involve recommending different amounts or intensities of exercise for men and women.

In conclusion, this groundbreaking study has shed new light on the health benefits of physical activity and the importance of considering sex-specific differences in exercise response. As we continue to learn more about these differences, we can develop more effective strategies for promoting physical activity and reducing the risk of mortality.

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Trending