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What the Scale of Displacement in Gaza Looks Like

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What the Scale of Displacement in Gaza Looks Like

Source: Satellite image by Maxar Technologies

Up to 1.8 million Gazans — around 80 percent of the population — have been forced to leave their homes since Israel began its bombardment in response to Hamas’s attack on Oct. 7. That number is expected to rise after Israel issued a new evacuation order on Saturday for areas in the south.

Total number of people displaced in the Gaza Strip since Oct. 7

Source: United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs via HDX

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Note: Estimates for the number of displaced people staying outside the shelter system are difficult to obtain and corrected periodically.

Gaza has never experienced so much internal displacement in such a short time. Earlier conflicts forced hundreds of thousands of Palestinians from their homes, but refugee experts said the current war was unprecedented for the number of people displaced within the enclave’s 140 square miles.

With Israel barring most Gazans from leaving and shelters swelling to many times over their capacity, humanitarian aid workers say there is no safe place to go as the fighting continues.

Where displaced people are staying at United Nations and government shelters

Each circle represents the total number of displaced people in shelters within one square kilometer.

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Sources: ReliefWeb Response (shelter populations); Israeli military (evacuation zone boundaries)

Note: Shelter locations shown are primarily schools; data for medical facilities and other buildings serving as shelters was not available. Data is as of Nov. 28.

There are at least 14 government and United Nations shelters within the new evacuation zone that Israeli forces announced on Saturday. These shelters had registered more than 68,000 displaced people as of Nov. 28.

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“People are sleeping on the streets and sidewalks without any means of protection,” said Yousef Hammash, an advocacy officer for the Norwegian Refugee Council, who fled from his home in northern Gaza in mid-October to stay with more than 40 relatives in a two-room home in Khan Younis. “And people in the shelters are trying to convince themselves that it’s a bit more safe than being in the street.”

“The situation before was unimaginable, and now they want to move people again,” he added.

Palestinians evacuated their homes damaged by Israeli airstrikes in Gaza City.

Ahmad Hasaballah/Getty Images

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A school in Khan Younis where displaced people have found refuge.

Samar Abu Elouf for The New York Times

About 1.4 million Palestinans have found shelter in or outside of Gaza’s schools, medical centers, mosques and churches. The rest — as many as a half a million people — are thought to be staying with relatives and even strangers, often sleeping outside in courtyards or crammed into small apartments.

A majority of the displaced have moved south, as intense air- and ground strikes by Israeli forces have destroyed much of the north, making it unlivable. But tens of thousands are estimated to remain in the north, including many who are unable to travel, such as the sick and disabled.

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Humanitarian organizations warn that shelters, even in the south, are not protected from fighting. The U.N. reported on Nov. 23 that since the start of the conflict, an estimated 191 people in shelters had been killed and 798 had been injured.

Many schools housing displaced people have been damaged since the war began, according to a UNICEF tracker, which relies on reports from other organizations on the ground.

Schools that have sheltered displaced people and have been damaged

Sources: UNICEF (shelter damage); Israeli military (evacuation zone boundaries)

Note: Major damage means the building exists but is not usable; moderate damage means the building is usable but damage occurred to the building’s infrastructure; minor damage means damage occurred to windows, doors and other parts of the building. Map includes government schools only. Data is as of Dec. 1.

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At least 28 government schools functioning as shelters have sustained major damage in the North Gaza and Gaza regions, making them no longer usable, and 122 others across the territory have sustained moderate or minor damage.

The U.N. has estimated that most of its shelters are at four times their capacity, at minimum, and unable to accommodate more people.

“You have to wait in line for two hours, just to use the bathroom,” Mr. Hammash said. “To have a shower is kind of a dream.”

Number of people staying in shelters in each region since Oct. 7

Many Gazans have moved south, but tens of thousands remain in shelters in the north.

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Source: United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs via HDX

The shelter population has soared in the Gaza Strip since the start of the war, especially in the central and southern regions of Deir al Balah, Khan Younis and Rafah, areas to which Israeli forces have told Palestinians to evacuate.

Close quarters and limited access to safe water and bathrooms is contributing to the spread of disease, along with the onset of winter, according to the World Health Organization. The agency has reported thousands of cases of acute respiratory infections, diarrhea and skin rashes in Gaza on average each day.

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A tent camp in Khan Younis.

Mohammed Salem/Reuters

A man prepares a fire for cooking at a U.N. school being used as a shelter in Gaza City.

Omar El-Qattaa/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

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During the seven-day cease-fire that ended on Friday, some people temporarily left shelters to return to their homes to investigate any damage. Some people displaced in the south even tried to go back to the north, according to the U.N.

The safety of displaced people is uncertain as the fighting continues into its ninth week, and people are once again forced to move to new locations.

“We are going to a new level of madness and bombardment,” Mr. Hammash said. “Now it’s the turn of the south.”

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Millennials Will Become the ‘Richest Generation in History,’ a New Report Says

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Millennials Will Become the ‘Richest Generation in History,’ a New Report Says

It looks like millennials will be able to buy houses after all. 

Those born between 1980 and 1994 are set to become part of the richest generation in history, according to the latest Wealth Report by U.K. real estate agency Knight Frank. The group can expect a “seismic” windfall over the next two decades, as $90 trillion of assets move between generations in the U.S. alone.

“When the silent generation (born from 1925 to 1945), the baby boomers (1946 to 1964), and the oldest cohort of Generation X (1965 to 1979), die, £2.5 trillion (roughly $3.1 million) in wealth tied up in their homes will be freed up,” the report reads.

In addition to property, the shares, bonds, and assets previous generations have accumulated will go to millennials. This transfer of equity will make the generation wealthier than all their predecessors.

However, many millennials have been affected by the economic headwinds created by the 2007 financial crisis, the pandemic, Brexit, and the invasion of Ukraine. Some are riddled with economic anxiety and need to work multiple jobs to pay bills. As such, any influx of cash would likely be spent on buying homes, paying off student loans, creating a pension pot, and building credit. It is also worth pointing out that inheritance is largely determined by a family’s financial status, e.g. those with rich parents stand to gain the most.

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The massive transfer of wealth could have an equally massive impact on society. Liam Bailey, global head of research at Knight Frank, believes younger generations will actively seek out greener homes, eco-friendly goods, and sustainable investments. Given their track record, he could be right. Millennials and Gen Z are leading the charge in climate change activism, the Pew Research Center reports. Both are talking more about environmental issues than older adults, taking to social media to mobilize and enact change.

It appears the financial shift is already underway, too. Knight Frank’s research found that 75 percent of millennials expect their wealth to increase in 2024, compared to 53 percent in the baby boomer generation, 56 percent in gen X, and 69 percent in the younger gen Z.

The future is looking slightly brighter—for millennials, at least.

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Drug addict used bizarre object in attempted post office robbery: police

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Drug addict used bizarre object in attempted post office robbery: police

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A drug addict tried to steal money through a security screen using a large spoon, British police reported. 

CCTV footage from the Hyson Green Post Office in Nottingham on Feb. 10 showed Jelanie Scott, 36, who leaned on crutches, in the corner of the room trying to get under the protective screen. 

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The staff quickly noticed him as he used a spoon and reached through the small gap at the bottom of the security screen on the counter. The panic alarm triggered, and smoke filled the post office as Scott fled.

“There was overwhelming evidence in this case, and I am pleased Scott has been held to account for his actions,” Sgt. Mark Southgate of the City Central neighborhood police team in Nottinghamshire said.

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Photo of the spoon used by Jelanie Scott, 36, to try to steal money at the Hyson Green Post Office side-by-side with CCTV screenshot of Scott. (Nottinghamshire Police )

“He told officers it was a stupid thing to do, and I hope he now reflects on his behavior and stays out of trouble,” Southgate said.

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Nottinghamshire police arrested Scott and charged him with attempted burglary. The Nottingham Magistrates’ Court on Feb. 21 then sentenced him to a six-month drug rehabilitation program and fined him fees and court costs totaling £283 (around $360). 

3 MEN CHARGED WITH TERRORISM PLOT IN UK COURT AFTER RIGHT-WING EXTREMISM PROBE

Nottingham post office

Hyson Green Post Office in Nottingham, England, where Jelanie Scott, 36, tried to steal money.

Scott appeared to have suffered some injury to his foot, hopping away with one crutch to support him as he escaped the building along with other customers when the smoke filled the room. 

Police had an easy time identifying Scott since he dropped his debit card before he managed to flee in a taxi. Police recognized him from CCTV and arrested him just a week later after locating him on a town road.

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Nottingham police crime

Police officer on Ilkeston Road, Nottingham, on June 14, 2023. (Jacob King/PA Images via Getty Images)

Scott pleaded guilty and admitted to the crimes, saying he had suffered mental anguish and had taken drugs – cocaine and heroin – shortly before the incident. 

Shoplifting and thefts in the U.K. have increased in recent months, according to the New York Times. One shop owner told the Times that he has to deal with three or four robberies a day, saying, “It’s like the Wild West out there at the moment.” 

The article claimed that opportunistic shoplifters, marauding teenagers, drug addicts and organized gangs have largely driven the looting surge. 

Shoplifting incidents increased by 25% for the year ending June 2023, according to official crime data from the British Office for National Statistics. 

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Australian spy chief under pressure to name ex-politician who ‘sold out’

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Australian spy chief under pressure to name ex-politician who ‘sold out’

The spy chief said a team from an unidentified country had cultivated and recruited a former Australian politician.

Australia’s spy chief is facing calls to name a former politician accused of having “sold out” the country to a foreign power.

Director-general of security for the Australian Security Intelligence Organisation (ASIO), Mike Burgess, said in an annual speech on Wednesday evening that a spy team from an unidentified country had cultivated and recruited a former Australian politician.

“This politician sold out their country, party and former colleagues to advance the interests of the foreign regime,” Burgess said in a speech in the capital, Canberra.

In his address, Burgess said a foreign intelligence service unit, named “the A-Team”, had made Australia its “priority target” and specifically targeted those with access to “privileged information” by using social networking sites and promising financial rewards.

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Burgess added that the unidentified former politician had been recruited “several years ago” and had suggested a plot to introduce a family member of the prime minister into the spy’s orbit, but the plan did not go ahead.

He said police had not charged the person because they were no longer active.

Following the unexpected revelations, Alex Turnbull, the son of former Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, said in an interview on Thursday with news.com.au that he had been approached about an infrastructure project by a group of suspected Chinese agents in around 2017 when his father was in government.

He said the group had links to a former New South Wales state Labour Party parliamentarian without naming the person.

However, current and former members of the opposition party have pushed for the name of the ex-politician to be released to avoid speculations.

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Former parliamentary treasurer, Joe Hockey, who also served as the ambassador to the United States, echoed the demands for the ex-politician to be named.

“Mr Burgess, having gone this far, must name that person rather than potentially smear everyone who has served their country,” Hockey wrote on X.

Opposition party leader, Peter Dutton, also said on radio station 2GB: “The trouble is, if he does not indicate the name then there is a cloud hanging over everybody else.”

Australia is a current member of the Five Eyes intelligence-sharing group, which includes the United States, Britain, Canada and New Zealand, making it a target for operatives from countries such as China and Russia.

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In 2018, under former Prime Minister Turnbull’s leadership, foreign interference laws were introduced, of which the “key purpose” of the measures was to expose China’s activities.

A Chinese-Australian businessman was sentenced to years and nine months in jail on Thursday for attempting to win favour with a minister – the first sentence given under the interference laws, according to state broadcaster ABC.

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