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‘Irish Lives Matter’ graffiti in Belfast, signs against ‘rehousing’ illegal migrants spark hate probe: report

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‘Irish Lives Matter’ graffiti in Belfast, signs against ‘rehousing’ illegal migrants spark hate probe: report

The message “Irish Lives Matter” scrawled in Belfast, Northern Ireland, as well as a sign posted saying one neighborhood would “no longer accept the rehousing of illegal immigrants” are reportedly being investigated by local police as hate-related incidents. The BBC, which also shared photos of the messaging, first reported about the investigation Wednesday. 

People Before Profit’s Gerry Carroll, whose social media profile contains various images showing support for the Black Lives Matter movement, condemned the incident in a statement. 

“Vile, intimidatory signs were erected in the Suffolk area calling for immigrants not to be housed there. Meanwhile, ‘Irish Lives Matter,’ was scrawled on a wall at the Kennedy Centre on Falls Road overnight,” Carroll wrote. “Nefarious and far-right elements are seeking to blame migrants, asylum seekers, and refugees for the problems caused by the rich and governments who protect and bolster corporate profits at all costs.” 

“Irish Lives Matter” spray-painted on a wall outside the Kennedy Centre in West Belfast.  (UTV.com)

“We are under no illusions that ‘Irish Lives Matter’ is a racist slogan which is directly counterpoised to movements against the oppression faced by black people and other ethnic minorities,” he said. “In recent days we have seen the chilling effect that the growth and intervention of far-right forces in the South can have on communities who are marginalized,” Carroll added, referring to the riots that unfolded across Dublin, the capital of the Republic of Ireland, in response to the stabbing of several people, including a woman and three children, outside a primary school in the city center. Local reports identified the suspect as an Algerian man who had become an Irish citizen after living on welfare in the country for decades. 

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IRELAND ANTI-HATE LAW PUSHED IN WAKE OF DUBLIN RIOTS COULD CRIMINALIZE MEMES, POSES FREE SPEECH CONCERNS

anti-Semitic graffiti in Belfast

A person walks past a pro-Palestinian mural with the antisemitic trip “from the river to the sea” on Falls Road in Belfast on Monday Nov. 27, 2023.  (Liam McBurney/PA Images via Getty Images)

Sinn Féin MP Paul Maskey condemned the signs as “disgraceful,” claiming they had been “erected in an attempt to create fear and intimidate people,” the BBC reported. 

A BBC photo of one sign posted in the Tildarg Avenue area had a word blurred out, but the outlet said it displayed an “an offensive term while referring to ‘other communities’.” 

“Political and community leaders must stand together to continue building a safe, welcoming and inclusive society for all,” Maskey said. 

Pro-Gaza spray painted message in Belfast

A woman walks past a pro-Palestinian mural in Belfast on Monday Nov. 27, 2023.  (Liam McBurney/PA Images via Getty Images)

In response to the Dublin riots, fueled by concerns over mass immigration into the country battling a housing and cost-of-living crisis, Irish Prime Minister (Taoiseach) Leo Varadkar vowed to “modernize laws against hatred,” pushing legislation widely considered by critics as a radical affront to free speech. 

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PROTESTS OVER FRENCH TEEN’S FATAL STABBING LEAD TO CALLS FOR CRACKDOWN ON ‘FAR-RIGHT’

The proposed anti-hate law notably criminalizes the possession of material “likely to incite violence or hatred,” and could reportedly punish individuals for merely having memes saved to their phones that some may consider politically offensive. 

Palestinian mural in Belfast

A man walks past a pro-Palestinian mural on the International Wall in Belfast on Monday, Nov. 27, 2023.  (Liam McBurney/PA Images via Getty Images)

Meanwhile, the streets of Belfast, a part of the United Kingdom, have been photographed with murals, flags and graffiti in support of Palestinians in recent weeks amid the Israel-Hamas war. Some of the signage contains messages calling for a ceasefire in Gaza, and one mural even displays the antisemitic slogan, “from the river to the sea,” calling for the annihilation of Israel, painted along the same Falls Road in Belfast where the “Irish Lives Matter” message was also found. 

Palestinian flag in Belfast

A Palestinian flag outside a home on Falls Road in Belfast on Monday Nov. 27, 2023.  (Liam McBurney/PA Images via Getty Images)

Earlier this month, Britain’s interior minister accused the country’s largest police force of being more lenient toward pro-Palestinian demonstrators than other groups, deepening a political feud sparked by the Israel-Hamas war. In a highly unusual attack on the police, Home Secretary Suella Braverman said London’s Metropolitan Police force was ignoring lawbreaking by “pro-Palestinian mobs,” decrying demonstrators calling for a cease-fire in Gaza as “hate marchers.”

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The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

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Millennials Will Become the ‘Richest Generation in History,’ a New Report Says

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Millennials Will Become the ‘Richest Generation in History,’ a New Report Says

It looks like millennials will be able to buy houses after all. 

Those born between 1980 and 1994 are set to become part of the richest generation in history, according to the latest Wealth Report by U.K. real estate agency Knight Frank. The group can expect a “seismic” windfall over the next two decades, as $90 trillion of assets move between generations in the U.S. alone.

“When the silent generation (born from 1925 to 1945), the baby boomers (1946 to 1964), and the oldest cohort of Generation X (1965 to 1979), die, £2.5 trillion (roughly $3.1 million) in wealth tied up in their homes will be freed up,” the report reads.

In addition to property, the shares, bonds, and assets previous generations have accumulated will go to millennials. This transfer of equity will make the generation wealthier than all their predecessors.

However, many millennials have been affected by the economic headwinds created by the 2007 financial crisis, the pandemic, Brexit, and the invasion of Ukraine. Some are riddled with economic anxiety and need to work multiple jobs to pay bills. As such, any influx of cash would likely be spent on buying homes, paying off student loans, creating a pension pot, and building credit. It is also worth pointing out that inheritance is largely determined by a family’s financial status, e.g. those with rich parents stand to gain the most.

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The massive transfer of wealth could have an equally massive impact on society. Liam Bailey, global head of research at Knight Frank, believes younger generations will actively seek out greener homes, eco-friendly goods, and sustainable investments. Given their track record, he could be right. Millennials and Gen Z are leading the charge in climate change activism, the Pew Research Center reports. Both are talking more about environmental issues than older adults, taking to social media to mobilize and enact change.

It appears the financial shift is already underway, too. Knight Frank’s research found that 75 percent of millennials expect their wealth to increase in 2024, compared to 53 percent in the baby boomer generation, 56 percent in gen X, and 69 percent in the younger gen Z.

The future is looking slightly brighter—for millennials, at least.

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Drug addict used bizarre object in attempted post office robbery: police

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Drug addict used bizarre object in attempted post office robbery: police

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A drug addict tried to steal money through a security screen using a large spoon, British police reported. 

CCTV footage from the Hyson Green Post Office in Nottingham on Feb. 10 showed Jelanie Scott, 36, who leaned on crutches, in the corner of the room trying to get under the protective screen. 

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The staff quickly noticed him as he used a spoon and reached through the small gap at the bottom of the security screen on the counter. The panic alarm triggered, and smoke filled the post office as Scott fled.

“There was overwhelming evidence in this case, and I am pleased Scott has been held to account for his actions,” Sgt. Mark Southgate of the City Central neighborhood police team in Nottinghamshire said.

UK ARRESTS ANOTHER BULGARIAN NATIONAL IN RUSSIAN ESPIONAGE SCHEME

Photo of the spoon used by Jelanie Scott, 36, to try to steal money at the Hyson Green Post Office side-by-side with CCTV screenshot of Scott. (Nottinghamshire Police )

“He told officers it was a stupid thing to do, and I hope he now reflects on his behavior and stays out of trouble,” Southgate said.

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Nottinghamshire police arrested Scott and charged him with attempted burglary. The Nottingham Magistrates’ Court on Feb. 21 then sentenced him to a six-month drug rehabilitation program and fined him fees and court costs totaling £283 (around $360). 

3 MEN CHARGED WITH TERRORISM PLOT IN UK COURT AFTER RIGHT-WING EXTREMISM PROBE

Nottingham post office

Hyson Green Post Office in Nottingham, England, where Jelanie Scott, 36, tried to steal money.

Scott appeared to have suffered some injury to his foot, hopping away with one crutch to support him as he escaped the building along with other customers when the smoke filled the room. 

Police had an easy time identifying Scott since he dropped his debit card before he managed to flee in a taxi. Police recognized him from CCTV and arrested him just a week later after locating him on a town road.

NORTHERN IRELAND JUDGE RULES THAT UK GOVERNMENT’S ‘TROUBLES’ LAW BREACHES HUMAN RIGHTS

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Nottingham police crime

Police officer on Ilkeston Road, Nottingham, on June 14, 2023. (Jacob King/PA Images via Getty Images)

Scott pleaded guilty and admitted to the crimes, saying he had suffered mental anguish and had taken drugs – cocaine and heroin – shortly before the incident. 

Shoplifting and thefts in the U.K. have increased in recent months, according to the New York Times. One shop owner told the Times that he has to deal with three or four robberies a day, saying, “It’s like the Wild West out there at the moment.” 

The article claimed that opportunistic shoplifters, marauding teenagers, drug addicts and organized gangs have largely driven the looting surge. 

Shoplifting incidents increased by 25% for the year ending June 2023, according to official crime data from the British Office for National Statistics. 

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Australian spy chief under pressure to name ex-politician who ‘sold out’

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Australian spy chief under pressure to name ex-politician who ‘sold out’

The spy chief said a team from an unidentified country had cultivated and recruited a former Australian politician.

Australia’s spy chief is facing calls to name a former politician accused of having “sold out” the country to a foreign power.

Director-general of security for the Australian Security Intelligence Organisation (ASIO), Mike Burgess, said in an annual speech on Wednesday evening that a spy team from an unidentified country had cultivated and recruited a former Australian politician.

“This politician sold out their country, party and former colleagues to advance the interests of the foreign regime,” Burgess said in a speech in the capital, Canberra.

In his address, Burgess said a foreign intelligence service unit, named “the A-Team”, had made Australia its “priority target” and specifically targeted those with access to “privileged information” by using social networking sites and promising financial rewards.

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Burgess added that the unidentified former politician had been recruited “several years ago” and had suggested a plot to introduce a family member of the prime minister into the spy’s orbit, but the plan did not go ahead.

He said police had not charged the person because they were no longer active.

Following the unexpected revelations, Alex Turnbull, the son of former Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, said in an interview on Thursday with news.com.au that he had been approached about an infrastructure project by a group of suspected Chinese agents in around 2017 when his father was in government.

He said the group had links to a former New South Wales state Labour Party parliamentarian without naming the person.

However, current and former members of the opposition party have pushed for the name of the ex-politician to be released to avoid speculations.

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Former parliamentary treasurer, Joe Hockey, who also served as the ambassador to the United States, echoed the demands for the ex-politician to be named.

“Mr Burgess, having gone this far, must name that person rather than potentially smear everyone who has served their country,” Hockey wrote on X.

Opposition party leader, Peter Dutton, also said on radio station 2GB: “The trouble is, if he does not indicate the name then there is a cloud hanging over everybody else.”

Australia is a current member of the Five Eyes intelligence-sharing group, which includes the United States, Britain, Canada and New Zealand, making it a target for operatives from countries such as China and Russia.

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In 2018, under former Prime Minister Turnbull’s leadership, foreign interference laws were introduced, of which the “key purpose” of the measures was to expose China’s activities.

A Chinese-Australian businessman was sentenced to years and nine months in jail on Thursday for attempting to win favour with a minister – the first sentence given under the interference laws, according to state broadcaster ABC.

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