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President Biden Orders A Bitcoin Miner Operator In Wyoming To Divest Alleging Ties To China

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President Biden Orders A Bitcoin Miner Operator In Wyoming To Divest Alleging Ties To China


Air Force fears lead Wyoming Bitcoin miner operator warning to divest interest due to alleged ties with China, following President Biden’s order in the United States.

Crypto and Bitcoin regulations are evolving in the United States. However, judging from the current administration’s declarations over its years in power, analysts think President Biden opposes cryptocurrencies.

Their position is clear from claiming that Bitcoin mining is a waste and that the United States SEC is cracking down on protocols launching on decentralized networks.

While Bitcoin mining has been said to benefit the national grid and help stabilize the network during surges, an executive order issued on Monday could hint at what lies ahead.

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Divest Your Operations: President Biden Orders

Citing national security concerns, President Biden ordered MineOne Partners Limited, a company registered in the British Virgin Islands, to divest their interest in a Bitcoin mining facility, alleging ties to China.

The mining farm in Wyoming is roughly a mile from the Francis E. Warren Air Force Base. State and Federal authorities were reportedly not comfortable with the miner being near such a critical installation managing nuclear-armed intercontinental ballistic missiles. 

Moreover, the committee overseeing foreign investment risks said that besides the proximity, “specialized equipment” was shipped to enable mining.

President Biden is taking action roughly a year after MineOne acquired the data center. The United States government wants its operators to sell their holdings within four months. 

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As part of the “insurmountable” risks, the committee said MineOne operators won’t access the site. Moreover, they have three months to remove all physical structures or installations.

In 2022, Microsoft, a United States technology company with a data center in the same area, also raised concern that MineOne could enable intelligence operations near the Air Force base. 

Microsoft reported MineOne to an inter-agency Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States.

DISCOVER: How to Buy Bitcoin ETF in May 2024 – Guide

United States Is A Power House In Bitcoin Mining

Following the ban on crypto mining operators in mainland China in 2021, most operators shifted their gear to the United States. This migration allowed the United States to be the world’s largest source of Bitcoin hash rate.

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Leading companies like Riot Blockchain and Marathon Digital continue to operate and expand, even going public. The Foundry USA is also the largest mining pool.

Bitcoin miner operator told to divest interest due to alleged ties with China following a presidential order in the United States

(Hash Rate Distribution)

Even so, amid the boom, there have been concerns.

In February, residents of Granbury, Texas, complained about the noise pollution from the mining farm. The irritating “hum” from the cooling fans needed to keep miners cool, one resident said, is “like sitting on the runway of an airport where jets are taking off, one after another.”

In 2022, New York imposed a moratorium on Bitcoin mining, citing concerns about the overuse of renewable energy resources.

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EXPLORE Bounce Bit Price Analysis – Can This New BTC DeFi Token 10x After a 90% Skyrocket?

Disclaimer: Crypto is a high-risk asset class. This article is provided for informational purposes and does not constitute investment advice. You could lose all of your capital



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Wyoming

As Wyoming Camping Season Kicks Off, Popular Snowy Range Road Remains Closed

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As Wyoming Camping Season Kicks Off, Popular Snowy Range Road Remains Closed


From Gary Willams’ perspective, everything old is new again when it comes to Boswell Road, a popular route for campers to take into the southern Snowy Range Mountains that runs right through his property.

He’s placed a gate across the road at his property line about a half-mile off Highway 230.

With peak camping season set to kick off over Memorial Day weekend, Willams told Cowboy State Daily that he intends to keep a gate closed, but not locked.

The road remains officially closed to the public. And Williams said that frustrates him, because he’s OK with folks passing through his property to get to some fantastic camping spots in the meadows beyond. All he asks is that people drive slowly past his house and close the gate behind them.

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He also isn’t impressed with the results of a meeting this week between the Albany County Commission and U.S. Forest Service officials about the status of the road. While both have at some point claimed ownership of the road, neither do now.

“Nothing came out of it,” he said. “They’re back to pointing their fingers at each other. We’re back to square one.”

County and Forest Service officials said a resolution is probably still at least months away.

Who Does It Even Belong To?

Jurisdiction over the road remains murky.

The Forest Service has always operated under the assumption that Boswell Road is an Albany County thoroughfare, Medicine Bow-Routt National Forest Supervisor Russell Bacon told the county commissioners.

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The roughly 11-mile dirt road route running between Highway 230 and Highway 10 in southern Albany County has never been marked as a Forest Service road on the agency’s maps, he said.

However, from a legal standpoint, it can’t be a country road either, and the county is frustrated over efforts to route it around Willams’ property on the west end hitting snags, Commission Chairman Pete Gosar said.

County engineers had plans to re-route the road, which is what Willams wants, only to have the Forest Service say that couldn’t happen unless it’s formally declared a county road, he said.

And it might be impossible for the county to ever claim full jurisdiction over the road because a section of it dips into Colorado.

About 25% of the route runs through private property, including Williams’ land at the west end, and the Boswell Ranch, owned by former Wyoming Gov. Matt Mead at the east end.

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Mead hasn’t gated his section of the road, but has placed “private road, no trespassing” signs at his property line.

Of the remaining 75% of the route, about half runs through the national forest and the rest crosses parcels controlled by the Bureau of Land Management and state of Wyoming.

For years, the Forest Service maintained Boswell Road in exchange for the county maintaining Harris Park Road.

However, the road hasn’t been maintained by either entity for at least a year. Some property owners recently told Cowboy State Daily that it’s become extremely rough in some places, even though it remains the best route in and out of the area.

  • A map shows where the Boswell Springs wind farm is in Albany County. (Courtesy Innergex)
  • Former Wyoming governor Matt Mead recently opted to close a section of the Boswell Road that runs through his property, just off Highway 10 in southern Albany County.
    Former Wyoming governor Matt Mead recently opted to close a section of the Boswell Road that runs through his property, just off Highway 10 in southern Albany County. (Mark Heinz, Cowboy State Daily)
  • Former Wyoming Gov. Matt Mead owns the historic Boswell Ranch just off Highway 10 in southern Albany County.
    Former Wyoming Gov. Matt Mead owns the historic Boswell Ranch just off Highway 10 in southern Albany County. (Mark Heinz, Cowboy State Daily)
  • The Carpenter Family has been ranching in Albany for six generations, but might not be able to access their summer range off Boswell Road this year, because the road has been closed.
    The Carpenter Family has been ranching in Albany for six generations, but might not be able to access their summer range off Boswell Road this year, because the road has been closed. (Courtesy Leisl Carpenter)

Not A Priority For Forest Service

One possible way out of the quandary would be for the county to secure easements along the sections of road that pass through private property. That could make it essentially a county road.

The section going through Colorado would be under Forest Service jurisdiction.

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If some property owners refuse to grant easements, the county could take the case to court.

But regardless of whether such easements were settled with a handshake or via a court order, the process would likely take months.

Boswell Road could also be officially converted to a Forest Service road. That would probably take even longer, because a full environmental assessment would be in order, Bacon told the commissioners.

He also said that with 4,500 miles of Forest Service road already under his office’s jurisdiction, “it’s not going to float very high on our priority list” to add Boswell Road, he said.

A 40-Year Wait

Willams has owned his property for 39 years, and said he’s always been frustrated by the back-and-forth between the Forest Service and Albany County when it comes to the road.

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It runs right next to his house, and he said he put up the gate because he was getting weary of traffic speeding by.

“I’ve had side-by-sides go through my yard doing 30-40 mph, I’m not kidding,” he said.

Mead previously told Cowboy State Daily that he closed his section of the road partly because he was concerned over liability should a speeding driver have a crash there.

“I’m worried about the same thing,” Willams said, which is why he wants people to slow down.

The Forest Service has put up “road closed” signs at the intersection of Boswell Road and Highway 230.

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Willams said he’s not happy about that.

“I’ve never stopped anybody from coming through. My gate was put there just to get people to slow down going through my property,” he said. “I hope people realize, it was the Forest Service that closed the road, not me,” he said.

As for where things go from here, Willams said he’s hopeful, but skeptical.

“Public opinion is what’s going to change this whole deal,” he said. “Maybe on the 40th anniversary of me owning the property we’ll get something done.”

Mark Heinz can be reached at mark@cowboystatedaily.com.

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Wondrous Wyoming (5/25/24)

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Wondrous Wyoming (5/25/24)


CHEYENNE, Wyo. — Here is a collection of photos of a rainbow, taken after a rainstorm, by photographer Laurali Nutt.

Do you have a photo that captures the beauty of Wyoming? Submit it by clicking here and filling out the form, and we may share



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Meet Wyoming Jefferson Award Finalist Glee Nett

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Meet Wyoming Jefferson Award Finalist Glee Nett


CHEYENNE, Wyo. (Wyoming News Now) – The Jefferson Awards honor those making a difference in communities across the state, and Glee Nett is one of those people.

Based in Cheyenne, Glee is the founder of the Children’s Western Wish Foundation. The Children’s Western Wish Foundation focuses on supporting youth battling childhood illnesses or who live with special needs, but there are no restrictions to who they serve. Glee and her team work to provide everyone with an unforgettable experience at the rodeo.

Reporter Grace Swanke had the opportunity to sit down with Glee to learn more about the work she does and the impact she has made in the lives of others in her community.

INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT:

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Grace Swanke: Start by telling us a little bit about the children’s Western Wish Foundation.

Glee Nett: The children’s Western wish came about so that I could continue to be with my rodeo family after I retired, and I did so so that we could give back to the community where our rodeos are held, and give back to one of their own community members and their immediate family. I named it children’s Western wish, because in the book of Psalms, there is a verse that says, ‘We’re all children of God’. Therefore in our 21 years of granting wishes, we have granted from a three year old to 101 year old.

GS: What inspired you to kind of start it was just the desire to still stay within the rodeo world, correct?

GN: Yes, and show the rest of the world that those who attend our Western heritage events, what we do to live the cowboy way, and to be good to one another. It’s a simple act of kindness. We do to live the cowboy way, and to be good to one another. It’s a simple act of kindness. I could not do this by myself. It takes our whole rodeo family, our rodeo committees, and the community themselves to give back and make the wish successful, and they all are.

GS: This is a big undertaking. This is a lot of work. What brings you joy, and what kind of motivates you to keep going?

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GN: The next wish. It motivates me because I see the rewards. Whether it’s a personal reward, or it’s a community reward. It’s the benefit that I have in doing what I am blessed to do is that I get to work with the man above and give from my heart. That’s my incentive to just keep going. I think it’s important that each one of us remember that we are given the opportunity so many times throughout every day, to give an act of kindness even if it’s just to share your smile. The difference you can make in someone’s life because you don’t know the battle the other person may be going through and that act of kindness and I’ve seen it too often has proven to be a lifelong memory and experience. So I would just ask everybody to extend that act of kindness to one another. It’s really easy to give.



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