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Biden blocks China-backed crypto mining firm from Wyoming

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Biden blocks China-backed crypto mining firm from Wyoming


The United States government has ordered a Chinese-backed cryptocurrency mining company to stop constructing a mine in Wyoming.

According to the May 13 order signed by President Joe Biden, MineOne Cloud Computing Investment and its partners will be required to divest the property located near the Francis E. Warren Air Force Base in Cheyenne, Wyoming.

MineOne Cloud is majority-owned by China. The company acquired the land in June 2022 and was preparing to set up a crypto-mining operation.

“There is credible evidence that leads me to believe that MineOne Partners Limited, a British Virgin Islands company ultimately majority owned by Chinese nationals […] might take action that threatens to impair the national security of the United States,” the order stated.

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The order also requires the firm to remove all installed equipment from the site. It also bans Chinese-linked entities from accessing the site, which is situated closehttps://crypto.news/uniswap-founder-urges-democrats-to-immediately-change-bidens-approach-to-crypto/ to the U.S. air base.

MineOne has 120 days to wind up operations and sell the property. The firm is also prohibited from transferring these assets to any third party.

The mining site was initially flagged in October 2023 by tech giant Microsoft, which operated a data center in the area.

Microsoft issued an alert to the Federal Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States, raising concerns that the site could be a “full-spectrum intelligence collection operation.”  

“We suggest the possibility that the computing power of an industrial-level crypto-mining operation, along with the presence of an unidentified number of Chinese nationals in direct proximity to Microsoft’s Data Center and one of three strategic-missile bases in the U.S., provides significant threat vectors,” Microsoft stated in its report.

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The report followed an investigation by the committee that identified national security risks.

Over the past years, the U.S. has seen multiple Chinese-owned crypto-mining farms migrating to the nation following a ban in China in 2021. Some regions in the U.S. offer cheap electricity rates, which is a major selling point for these entities.

According to a New York Times report, Chinese-owned mining farms were reported in at least 12 states, including Texas, Wyoming, Arkansas, and Ohio.

Last month, the Biden government initiated a crackdown on the cryptocurrency mining sector with a 30% tax on electricity use by the miners. The move was met with criticism, with Senator Cynthia Lummis, a Wyoming Republican, claiming it would “destroy” the sector.



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Wyoming

White Supremacist Who Wants Legal Child Porn Doing Business Through Wyoming LLC

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White Supremacist Who Wants Legal Child Porn Doing Business Through Wyoming LLC


A globally recognized Danish white supremacist is doing business in Wyoming, or at least through the Cowboy State as a registered LLC here.

Emil Kirkegaard has been accused by many of using scientific racism as a base for his open-access research journal website where he’s published numerous articles supporting a basis for biological differences between races, ethnicities and immigrant groups on measures such as crime and IQ.

Kirkegaard filed his Mankind Publishing House LLC with the state of Wyoming on Feb. 4, using Sheridan-based Northwest Registered Agent Service Inc. as the registered agent for the filing. Kirkegaard was at one time the internet domain owner of Mankind Quarterly, a racist pseudo journal rejected by most of the scientific community.

The contact information associated with the filing includes a California phone number that is now disconnected.

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Kirkegaard legally changed his name to William Engman in 2021. The Wyoming business filing lists Engman as the organizer for the limited liability company, which is registered to a Denmark address. This address matches the address used on his scientific journal website.

He also owes more than $63,000 in legal fees stemming from a lawsuit he dropped in 2020, according to public records.

Child Porn OK Too

In a 2012 blog post, Kirkegaard wrote that it would be a “good idea to legalize child porn” because he thinks viewing this content would reduce the number of rapes committed by pedophiles. He’s also stated that he would support lowering the age of consent to 13 or lower if puberty begins earlier.

Despite his own views on child porn and age of consent, Kirkegaard has tried to link homosexuality to pedophilia and categorized all left-wing people as pedophiles on his blog.

Kirkegaard filed a defamation lawsuit against English writer Oliver Smith in 2018 after Smith called Kirkegaard a “pedophile” upon reading his blog posts. He subsequently dropped the lawsuit in 2020, but was ordered to pay Smith’s legal fees as a result, which is the source of the debt.

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Smith wrote on his blog he believes Kirkegaard changed his name as part of an effort to avoid paying the debt.

The writer also told Cowboy State Daily he believes Kirkegaard filed his business in Wyoming as a way to exploit the state’s loose LLC registration laws in a further attempt to avoid paying the $63,768 legal debt he owes to Smith.

The original debt was much smaller but has grown by accruing interest since 2020.

Cowboy Cocktail

Wyoming has some of the most private business filing laws in the country and the cheapest rates to file, which allows people to easily cloak their identities when filing with the state.

These laws have drawn significant scrutiny in recent years as some nefarious actors have been found doing business in the state.

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Earlier this spring, a Fremont County investigation revealed an influx of out-of-state businesses filing to addresses in that county, often unbeknownst to the actual property owners.

In another instance, there were 551 different businesses registered to a single address.

Secretary of State Chuck Gray announced earlier this week the dissolvement of three businesses connected by the FBI to North Korean actors.

Gray said his office has proposed several interim topics to the Wyoming Legislature to take further administrative action against entities on the basis of their being owned or controlled by foreign adversaries.

Leo Wolfson can be reached at leo@cowboystatedaily.com.

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How Jeff Linder found his way to the Texas Tech basketball staff from Wyoming

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How Jeff Linder found his way to the Texas Tech basketball staff from Wyoming


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When Dave Smart left his post with the Texas Tech basketball team to become the new head coach at Pacific, there was a glaring hole on Grant McCasland’s staff.

As it turns out, to replace one assistant coach, McCasland needed to look at other sitting head coaches to fill the void.

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Jeff Linder, who spent the last four years leading the men’s basketball program at Wyoming, officially joined McCasland’s staff on May 14 in what was a rather unique situation.

ESPN’s Pete Thamel reported on Linder’s pending arrival in Lubbock on May 9. He also reported Wyoming already had Linder’s replacement in Sundance Wicks, on May 12, two days before Tech announced Linder’s signing.

In those five days, it became apparent things weren’t great between Linder and the Cowboys. McCasland provided some clarity on the situation earlier this week in his first availability of the offseason.

“I think what happened in his scenario is just completely unique to (name, image and likeness),” McCasland said. “How do you build a team and what are the opportunities that each university has to build it? I think ultimately, he was at a transition time where he’s trying to figure out how to navigate this new landscape and we were able to convince him to come to Tech and be a part of winning a national championship.”

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McCasland and Linder go back to their time at Midland College together, where they led the team to an appearance in the JUCO national quarterfinals. They first met when McCasland was a residence hall director at Northeastern Junior College in Colorado while Linder was working at Division II Emporia State. Linder was trying to recruit some of Northeastern’s players.

The two coaches are the same age — Linder will turn 47 next month — and have children who are also the same age. They’ve been connected for decades, and the opportunity presented itself to reunite in Lubbock.

“These days in college basketball I think your staff has to be connected,” McCasland said, “and people not only have to love the game, but you’ve got to be able to trust each other and he’s a guy that I trust with everything.”

There is some fallout from how Linder wound up in Lubbock, though.

Alex Taylor, the University of Wyoming beat reporter for the Wyoming Tribune, reported Tuesday via X (formerly Twitter) that Tech and Wyoming reached an agreement to sort out Linder’s buyout with his previous school.

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In exchange for Linder coming to Texas Tech, Taylor reported, Wyoming will visit Lubbock for non-conference games during the 2024-25 and 2025-26 seasons in which Tech will pay guarantees of $150,000 each ($300,000 total).

Wyoming will also receive an additional $200,000 for its return football game in Lubbock in 2028. Tech, which lost at Wyoming on the gridiron in the 2023 season opener, was set to pay $300,000 for the Cowboys’ trip to Lubbock. That price tag will now be $500,000.

“UW agreed to waive the remaining portion of his liquidated damages after Coach Linder vacated the money owed to him,” Wyoming AD Tom Burman said in a statement, “and Texas Tech agreed to provide financial support for a few competitions. UW felt that this was a good compromise.”

Taylor said in a previous social media post that “Linder has talked extensively for the past two seasons about the lack of NIL in Laramie.”

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Now that the dust has settled, Linder is officially with the Red Raiders, and McCasland sees it as an immediate positive for Tech’s on-court possibilities.

“I think on the floor coaching and game planning,” McCasland said, “he’s really going to be a huge add for us. … He’s an awesome guy more than anything and I really think he’ll help us basketball wise, but his character and who he is as a person is the biggest add to our program.”



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Cowboy State Daily Video News: Friday, May 24th, 2024

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Cowboy State Daily Video News: Friday, May 24th, 2024


It’s time to take a look at what’s happening around Wyoming! I’m Wendy Corr, bringing you headlines from the Cowboy State Daily newsroom, for Friday, May 24th.

The National Park Service and the Montana Department of Transportation, or MDOT, hoped to open the Beartooth Highway for Memorial Day weekend. Mother Nature had other plans.

The opening of the Beartooth Highway, a popular scenic drive outside Yellowstone National Park, was scheduled for 8 a.m. Friday. But Cowboy State Daily’s Andrew Rossi reports the opening has been delayed because of “deep, drifting snow.”

“They’re expecting another two feet of snow on the Beartooth Highway just on Thursday, and it’s possible there could be more over the weekend. So MDOT says they might be able to clear part of the highway from Red Lodge up to a spot called Vista Point, but they won’t clear it to the Wyoming State Line. And the National Park Service has confirmed that it’s going to keep the Wyoming side of the highway closed throughout Memorial Day weekend.” 

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The Park Service issued several other road closures in Yellowstone on Thursday. Sylvan Pass, the route between Yellowstone’s East Entrance and Fishing Bridge, was closed for most of the day due to slick roads and stuck vehicles.

A retired couple in the tiny Carbon County town of Dixon have landed in no-man’s land when it comes to insuring their mobile home. After 42 years of carrying coverage continuously with their insurance company, never missing a payment and never turning in a claim, their company dropped their coverage.

The couple told Cowboy State Daily’s Renee Jean that they believe many other senior citizens are facing similar difficulties.

“They own a mobile home, which has always been harder to insure. And they got a notice that their rate was going to go up by $1900. They’re senior citizens, they’re living on a fixed income. That wasn’t something they could afford. They shopped around, they thought they had found a new insurance, then they accepted lower coverage with a lower premium. But then that insurer raised the roof on the rates, and that’s left them with no affordable options.” 

Mobile homes have always been more difficult to insure. Now, most companies don’t want to bother with them at all.

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A Cheyenne judge Thursday sentenced a former Wyoming Highway Patrol Trooper who raped a woman to 10-15 years in prison.

But Cowboy State Daily’s Clair McFarland reports that state Representative Landon Brown of Cheyenne lobbied the judge for leniency, calling former state trooper Gabriel Testerman, quote, “a man of God.”

“He pointed to the fact that Testerman has maintained his innocence all along. You know, he didn’t go so far as to say that he disbelieved the jury. He said he trusts the process, but he pointed to Testerman’s good character as reported by other people, and his role in the community, and said that he would do well on a suspended sentence or probation.”

However, Judge Robin Cooley agreed with the prosecutors, that Testerman had violated the trust the community had placed in him as a law enforcement officer.

Lander-based Visionary Metals, whose chief executive has family ties to the famed uranium heartland community of Jeffrey City, is staking a potential $1 billion claim on America’s next big strategic mineral — nickel.

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CEO Wes Adams told energy reporter Pat Maio that his startup company is in an exploratory stage to dig up nickel and its byproduct, cobalt, in the Granite Mountains north of Jeffrey City. 

“The deposits that he’s identified are in two different prospects. One is called the King Solomon prospect, and the second one is called the Tin Cup prospect. And a prospect can have deposits in them anywhere from 10 million to 50 million tons of ore… So this could be a rather significant find for him.” 

At $10 a pound for nickel, that could mean there’s a total of $1 billion of ore in the two prospects claimed by Visionary Metals.

The scenario that’s played out in Cody over the past year, with locals suing to halt plans to build an LDS temple, is happening in cities all over the United States.

Cowboy State Daily’s Leo Wolfson reports that communities in Texas and Utah are seeing similar battles.

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“A lawsuit has been filed in Heber City, Utah, over almost identical circumstances and parties as the Cody one – like Cody, it was filed by neighbors who are opposing the structure. In the town of Fairview, Texas, which is a North suburb of Dallas, there’s also may be a lawsuit imminent, especially after a planning Zoning Commission recommended rejecting a proposed temple there. The mayor of Fairview has said that the temple has already threatened to take legal action about this.” 

Cody mayor Matt Hall told Wolfson that many city officials didn’t know the City code was written in a way that circumvents the council.

And that’s today’s news. Get your free digital subscription to Wyoming’s only statewide newspaper by hitting the subscribe button on cowboystatedaily.com. And don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel! I’m Wendy Corr, for Cowboy State Daily.



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