Connect with us

Washington

Will Washington State make the 2024 NCAA Tournament? Team Resume, Outlook & Odds | February 12

Published

on

Will Washington State make the 2024 NCAA Tournament? Team Resume, Outlook & Odds | February 12


For bracketology insights on Washington State and its chances of making the 2024 NCAA Tournament, you’ve come to the right spot. Below, we go over the team’s full tournament resume, outlining all you need to know.

Want to bet on Washington State’s upcoming games or futures options? Head to BetMGM to see what is available!

March Madness odds

  • Odds to win the national championship: +25000
  • Preseason national championship odds: +20000
  • Pre-new year national championship odds: +35000

How Washington State ranks

Record Pac-12 Record AP Poll Coaches Poll RPI
18-6 9-4 35 NR 42

Rep your team with officially licensed college basketball gear! Head to Fanatics to find jerseys, shirts, and much more.

Washington State’s best wins

Washington State took down the No. 8 Arizona Wildcats in a 73-70 win on January 13. It was its best victory of the season. Isaac Jones led the charge against Arizona, recording 24 points. Second on the team was Myles Rice with 18 points.

Advertisement

Next best wins

  • 66-61 over Boise State (No. 34/RPI) on December 21
  • 78-69 at home over Colorado (No. 48/RPI) on January 27
  • 62-56 on the road over Oregon (No. 65/RPI) on February 10
  • 79-57 at home over Utah (No. 67/RPI) on January 24
  • 82-72 at home over Eastern Washington (No. 92/RPI) on November 27

Get tickets for any college basketball game this season at Ticketmaster!

Washington State’s quadrant records

Quadrant 1: 3-3 | Quadrant 2: 3-1 | Quadrant 3: 5-2 | Quadrant 4: 7-0

  • According to the RPI, Washington State has three wins versus Quadrant 1 opponents, tied for the 11th-most in the nation.
  • The Cougars have tied for the 32nd-most Quadrant 2 wins in the nation based on the RPI (three).
  • Washington State has tied for the 39th-most Quadrant 3 wins in the nation according to the RPI (five).

Sign up for Fubo, ESPN+ and Max to catch college basketball all season long!

Schedule insights

  • Washington State is facing the 67th-ranked schedule (based on our predictions) the rest of the way.
  • Of the Cougars’ seven remaining games this season, six are against teams with worse records, and five are against teams with records north of .500.
  • Reviewing Wazzu’s upcoming schedule, it has one game left against teams ranked in the Top 25.

Washington State’s next game

  • Matchup: Washington State Cougars vs. California Golden Bears
  • Date/Time: Thursday, February 15 at 10:00 PM ET
  • Location: Beasley Coliseum in Pullman, Washington
  • TV Channel: Pac-12 Network

Sportsbook promo codes

Check out betting offers for upcoming Washington State games across these sportsbooks:

Not all offers available in all states, please visit BetMGM for the latest promotions for your area. Must be 21+ to gamble, please wager responsibly. If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, contact 1-800-GAMBLER.

© 2023 Data Skrive. All rights reserved.



Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Washington

School districts across Washington see bonds fail despite approval from a majority of voters

Published

on

School districts across Washington see bonds fail despite approval from a majority of voters


click to enlarge

After last week”s special election, school districts across Washington are wondering how to move forward after only one-third of the 21 proposed school bonds passed. The rest, even those that were approved by a majority of voters, failed.

This includes all five school bonds that Spokane County voters in various school districts weighed in on. Even though each bond garnered more than 50% of the vote, bond measures require a 60% supermajority to pass.

Reaching that threshold hasn’t usually been an issue for Spokane Public Schools — at least in recent history. Before last week, voters hadn’t turned down an SPS bond proposition in half a century. In the past 20 years, the district successfully passed four bond proposals, raising more than $1.1 billion (which came with an additional $150 million in state-matching funds).

In 2018, SPS asked its voters to approve a $495.3 million bond (it’s largest ask ever) to fund construction of three new middle schools, replacement of three others, updates to some schools’ aging infrastructure and construction of ONE Spokane Stadium in downtown Spokane. Despite rejecting the downtown stadium location in an advisory vote, voters still passed the 2018 bond measure with nearly 70% approval.

Advertisement

This year, SPS asked voters to approve a $200 million bond that would’ve funded replacement of two elementary schools (Adams and Madison) and significant updates to North Central High School. It also would’ve funded the construction planning for future school replacements. Though 56% of voters approved of it, the bond failed — making it the largest district in the state to have a bond fail this year.

The other school bonds on the February ballot in the county were in the Cheney, Deer Park, Riverside and West Valley school districts. Each failed despite garnering between 50% and 54% of the vote.

It’s not a total loss though. All but a few of the school levies on the ballot in Spokane County passed. Tax levies require only simple majority of “yes” votes to pass.

‘DEVASTATING’

“Obviously the results were quite disappointing,” says Beth Nye, principal of Adams Elementary School. “The word I’ve been using is ‘devastating.’”

Adams Elementary was one of the two schools that would have been replaced if this year’s bond had been successful. According to Nye, it’s the last school on the South Hill that hasn’t been modernized or replaced.

Advertisement

As it stands, Adams isn’t compliant with ADA standards because it doesn’t have an elevator. This means students living within the school’s boundaries who are unable to traverse the school’s multiple floors must attend another elementary school.

“We were all looking forward to this bond passing, which would lead us straight into our replacement starting in June,” Nye says. “Now, we’re dealing with that disappointment, and we can hopefully use this as a moment to help [the community] recognize that our schools do need to continue to have these funds so that we can make sure our facilities are kept up and modern for our students.”

All the pre-work for the school’s replacement was completed with funds from the $145 million 2015 bond, according to Ryan Lancaster, the district’s spokesperson.

“We were able to fund through that bond all of the design work and the site planning, so they were pretty much shovel ready,” he says. “That whole project would have gotten off the ground pretty quickly.”

There is about $50 million left over from previous bonds, which Lancaster says will help cover some of the smaller projects that the district had planned. It won’t include any projects at Adams.

Advertisement

“Typically, we go through a process every year where we have a chance to point out some of the smaller projects that we would benefit from,” Nye says. “But because Adams was on the list for a replacement, we were not focused on any smaller projects.”

The SPS board is scheduled to meet this week to discuss options for the district and Adams, Lancaster says.

‘AWFUL AND UNDEMOCRATIC’

Lancaster thinks that the biggest factors in the bond’s failure are the skyrocketing property values alongside the 60% approval threshold that bonds require.

There’s not much that school districts can do to affect these property values, so the focus has been on reducing the supermajority requirement that’s been in place since 1952. Still, there are many hoops to pass through if that’s ever going to change.

“[The supermajority requirement] is a massive barrier, especially since the culture war against public education,” says Washington Superintendent of Public Instruction Chris Reykdal. “It’s frustrating, and I think it’s awful and undemocratic.”

Advertisement

“Obviously the results were quite disappointing. The wordI’ve been using is ‘devastating.’”

tweet this

If bonds required only a simple majority for approval, all but three of this year’s bond measures in Washington would have passed. Additionally, over the past 10 years, only 45% of school bonds in the state were approved. If the supermajority requirement weren’t in place, 72% of the failed bonds would have passed, meaning about 85% of the total bond asks would have passed, according to Reykdal’s office.

“It’s always important to remember it’s not just local taxpayers’ funding,” Reykdal says. “A lot of state-matching funds won’t be going to these districts now.”

The state matching funds for the 11 school bonds that won more than 50% of the vote but less than the 60% supermajority totaled $227.1 million, Reykdal stated in a release.

Advertisement

Since the supermajority requirement is embedded in the Washington Constitution, a two-thirds majority vote is needed in both chambers of the Legislature to change the law. Then, if the Legislature did approve the change, the measure would go to state voters — with final passage requiring support from a simple majority.

Those who support having a supermajority threshold for school bonds say that lowering this threshold would be unfair to the taxpayers that the requirement is meant to protect.

“Most taxpayers can see a good plan and they can see a bad plan. Sixty percent protects them,” Jeff Daily of Port Orchard, a former South Kitsap School District board member, told legislators earlier this year, according to Crosscut.

Jeff Pack, a representative of Washington Citizens Against Unfair Taxes, also told legislators that they “just want to change the rules to fit your agenda.”

While constitutional changes must clear a relatively high hurdle, they’re not unheard of. In 2007, the state constitution was amended to allow school levies to pass with only a simple majority, rather than the previously required supermajority.

Advertisement

(This year, SPS passed its $300 million levy with about the same amount of voter approval as its bond. Central Valley School District passed both of its levies with about 52% approval, and Mead School District also passed its levy with almost 53% approval.)

That said, a change to school bond requirements looks unlikely this year. Senate Bill 5823, which would reduce the bond requirement to a simple majority, stalled in the Senate Ways and Means Committee, where it died for the session. ♦





Source link

Continue Reading

Washington

An experienced Eastern Washington team is stacking wins and soaring toward March

Published

on

An experienced Eastern Washington team is stacking wins and soaring toward March


click to enlarge

Erick Doxey photo

Guard/Forward Casey Jones

Advertisement

When you think of Cheney, college basketball probably isn”t the first thing that comes to mind, but these days maybe it should be. That’s because the Eastern Washington University Eagles have found a consistent formula that’s turning high-octane offense into success in the win column.

The Eagles are 17-9 on the season and an impressive 11-2 in Big Sky Conference play. Their record is no fluke. Under third-year head coach David Riley, Eastern Washington has built a culture that allows players to have fun on the basketball court and, in turn, encourages them to stay and develop within the program. These Eags are old and experienced, and it shows in their results.

“I think our development track record kind of speaks for itself. We had five of the last seven [Big Sky] MVPs. We’ve kind of done all this success with developing our own guys,” Riley says. “I think that’s lost nowadays where people transfer from school to school and they just kind of work on what’s right in front of them. We try to have a long-term vision for each of our guys.”

That long-term vision can only pay off if the players are willing to stick around. At Eastern, the top-five leading scorers are upperclassmen, all averaging over 10 points per game.

Advertisement

Ethan Price and Casey Jones have spent their entire careers at Eastern. Cedric Coward and Dane Erikstrup are in their second year in the program after transferring up from the D-III and D-II levels respectively. Of those five, only Jake Kyman is a first-year transfer (UCLA to Wyoming to EWU).

When you take an experienced core like that and let them loose on the offensive end, you wind up with some electrifying basketball.

“It’s a fun way to play, and it allows you to be yourself out there” Riley says. “Our guys get to play to their strengths. They don’t have to fit into some box, which is nice, and it’s just a fun group. We’ve got a really low-ego, goofy group. It’s fun to root for.”

He’s not wrong. As of Feb. 16, the Eagles are averaging a shade under 80 points per game behind one of the more uptempo offenses in the entire sport. They’re shooting 49.8 percent from the field, the eighth-best mark in the country. If not for a brutal start to the season that saw the Eagles go on the road to face power conference team after power conference team, those numbers would be even higher.

After reigning Big Sky MVP Steele Venters transferred to Gonzaga in the offseason, EWU wasn’t tabbed by coaches or the media to be Big Sky favorites. The Eagles opened the season with a 1-6 record and losses to Utah, Mississippi, Cincinnati, Stanford, Washington State and USC, all on the road. Their only win in November came in their only home game that month, against non-Division I Walla Walla.

Advertisement

“I felt like every game [in November] taught us a different lesson, and the beauty of it is it forces you to live in reality, those big games against really good teams,” Riley says. “Because sometimes against lesser teams, if you make a mistake, they’re not going to make you pay for it.”

The Eagles scheduled those games knowing that it would be tough but that they’d be able to learn from them. It’s not the kind of schedule you’d want with a young team, but with an older team like he has this season, Riley’s group wanted the challenge.

“We kind of had a choice between a non-Division I team and Stanford, just the way it worked out. We talked to our veterans that were returning and they were like, ‘Let’s go see where we’re at, let’s get another Power Five game.’”

While all the Power Five games resulted in a loss, it helped lay a foundation for the success that the Eagles are having in Big Sky play. Eastern’s running away with the league race in conference play, multiple games clear of all challengers as the team enters its final five games of the regular season.

Unfortunately, at the Big Sky level, to make the NCAA Tournament you have to win the Big Sky Tournament — in its 60-year history, the league has never sent multiple teams dancing. Last season the top-seeded Eagles fell victim to a 1-point upset in the first round of the conference tournament, which despite an incredible regular season, dashed their NCAA Tournament dreams.

Advertisement

This season’s Eagles, for the most part, were also last season’s Eagles. They certainly remember what happened a year ago.

“I think it definitely shaped our goals and our vision for the year. We talked about how we have one main goal and then a bunch of secondary goals. So the main goal is to win in [the Big Sky Tournament]. That’s the No. 1 goal. We talked about that on June 20, our first day,” Riley says.

One of the secondary goals, he says, is to win the Big Sky regular season as well. They’re on track to do that with just five games remaining, including two at home next week against rivals Montana and Montana State, the latter of which defeated Eastern in league play this season.

When asked what people around Spokane should know about his team this season, Riley mentions their appealing style of play, the program’s success in having the most wins in the Big Sky over the past 10 seasons, and specifically the quality of this year’s squad. But he twice noted where Cheney is relative to Spokane.

“We’re 20 minutes away to watch some great hoops and come support these guys.” ♦

Advertisement

Eastern Washington vs. Montana • Thu, Feb. 29 at 6 pm • Reese Court • ESPN+
Eastern Washington vs. Montana State • Sat, March 2 at 2 pm • Reese Court • ESPN+





Source link

Continue Reading

Washington

Baltimore-Washington Parkway crashes cause major delays early Thursday morning

Published

on

Baltimore-Washington Parkway crashes cause major delays early Thursday morning


Two early morning crashes along the Baltimore-Washington Parkway caused major delays Thursday in the Laurel area.

The southbound lanes of the parkway were closed due to a crash before Powder Mill Road. FOX 5’s Annie Mae says traffic is exiting at MD-197 toward US-1 or southbound Interstate-95 to join the Beltway.

Advertisement

A crash along the northbound lanes of the parkway before MD-197 have the right lane and shoulder blocked.

Southbound delays are at over an hour and northbound lanes are delayed nearly 30 minutes.



Source link

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending