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N.C. Ferry System Career Fair will be held in Washington on Feb 12. | Island Free Press

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N.C. Ferry System Career Fair will be held in Washington on Feb 12. | Island Free Press


Hatteras Ferry Docks

​​​​​​​​​​​​The NCWorks Career Center will host a job fair for the N.C. Department of Transportation’s N.C. Ferry Division in Washington, North Carolina, on Feb. 12. This job fair will include a hiring team on-site for immediate interviews.

Candidates are encouraged to apply online in advance​ and download and complete this career ​a​pplication​ prior to the event.​​

This job fair will be held:

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Monday, Feb. 12, 2024
10 a.m.-3 p.m.
NCWorks Career Center
1502 N. Market St.
Washington​​​​

The N.C. Ferry Division seeks to recruit multiple positions, including:

  • General utility workers: traffic, parking, grounds maintenance (All ferry terminals and N.C. shipyard)
  • Security Guard
  • Ferry Crew Member I
  • Admin associates
  • Painter/Chipper (Dare County)
  • Welders (Dare County)
  • Marine Maintenance Deckhand (Dredge)
  • Human Resources Tech I (Craven County)
  • Marine Mechanic Supervisor I (Craven County)​​

There are also three other Career Fairs scheduled for February and early March throughout coastal North Carolina. Information on each event can be found via the links below.

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Washington

Cogent: Q4 Earnings Snapshot

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Cogent: Q4 Earnings Snapshot


WASHINGTON — WASHINGTON — Cogent Communications Group Inc. (CCOI) on Thursday reported fourth-quarter profit of $200.2 million.

The Washington-based company said it had net income of $4.17 per share. Losses, adjusted for non-recurring gains, came to 16 cents per share.

The results exceeded Wall Street expectations. The average estimate of four analysts surveyed by Zacks Investment Research was for a loss of 95 cents per share.



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Borer Brings Reading Tour to Washington School’s English Language Program

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Borer Brings Reading Tour to Washington School’s English Language Program


Written by Michael P. Walsh

WEST HAVEN, CT — Mayor Dorinda Borer brought her reading tour to a temporarily relocated elementary school on Meloy Road to highlight the importance of literacy.

On Tuesday, Feb. 27, Borer met with students at Washington Elementary School and read children’s books, including the 2004 Mo Willems book “Knuffle Bunny: A Cautionary Tale,” to students of the school’s English Language Learners program for grades K-4.

The school is housed until further notice in the former Molloy Elementary School building at 255 Meloy Road while a new Washington school is constructed at 369 Washington Ave.

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The ELL program is composed of 127 students, including 13 newcomers, and is led by ELL-certified teachers Pauline Moycik, Meghan Abate and Helen Soufrine.

According to Washington Principal Alicia M. Limosani, at least 18 different languages are spoken by the students and their families.

During the half-hour reading session, an energetic and engaging Borer received enthusiastic comments and responses from the classroom of students.

To show their gratitude for the mayor’s visit, students presented Borer with two bouquets of flowers and two large signs with “Thank You Mayor” printed in colored markers.

Borer said she plans to hang the paper signs in her office at City Hall before making more stops on her school reading tour during Read Across America Week.

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The five-day event, promoted as “celebrating a nation of diverse readers,” kicks off March 2, the birthday of children’s author Dr. Seuss, and runs through March 6.

Read Across America, established in 1998, is an initiative of the Washington, D.C.-based National Education Association to encourage reading. The year-round program focuses on “motivating children to read through events, partnerships and reading resources that are about everyone, for everyone.”

West Haven Mayor Dorinda Borer on Tuesday, Feb. 27, reads the 2004 Mo Willems children’s book “Knuffle Bunny: A Cautionary Tale” to students of Washington Elementary School’s English Language Learners program for grades K-4. The West Haven school is temporarily housed in the former Molloy Elementary School building at 255 Meloy Road while a new Washington school is constructed at 369 Washington Ave. The ELL program is led by ELL-certified teachers Pauline Moycik, Meghan Abate and Helen Soufrine. (City Photo/Michael P. Walsh)

West Haven Mayor Dorinda Borer is surprised with two bouquets of flowers given by students of Washington Elementary School’s English Language Learners program for grades K-4. Before receiving the bouquets, Borer read children’s books to the students, including the 2004 Mo Willems book “Knuffle Bunny: A Cautionary Tale.” (City Photo/Michael P. Walsh)

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West Haven Mayor Dorinda Borer is all smiles with students and teachers of Washington Elementary School’s English Language Learners program for grades K-4. (City Photo/Michael P. Walsh)


This press release was produced by the City of West Haven. The views expressed here are the author’s own.



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Supreme Court sets April arguments over whether Trump can be prosecuted for election interference

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Supreme Court sets April arguments over whether Trump can be prosecuted for election interference


WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Wednesday agreed to decide whether former President Donald Trump can be prosecuted on charges he interfered with the 2020 election and set a course for a quick resolution.

The justices’ order maintains a hold on preparations for a trial focused on Trump’s efforts to overturn his election loss. The court will hear arguments in late April, with a decision likely no later than the end of June.

But even with a timetable that is much faster than usual, the court action calls into question whether a trial for Trump, assuming the justices deny his immunity bid, can be scheduled and concluded prior to the November election.

Trump’s lawyers have sought to put off a trial until after the voting.

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By taking up the legally untested question now, the justices have created a scenario of uncertainty that special counsel Jack Smith had sought to avoid when he first asked the high court in December to immediately intervene. In his latest court filing, Smith had suggested arguments a full month earlier than the late April timeframe.

Spokespeople for Trump and Smith did not immediately respond to a message seeking comment.

The court said in an unsigned statement that it will consider “whether and if so to what extent does a former President enjoy presidential immunity from criminal prosecution for conduct alleged to involve official acts during his tenure in office.”

The Supreme Court has previously held that presidents are immune from civil liability for official acts, and Trump’s lawyers have for months argued that that protection should be extended to criminal prosecution as well.

Lower courts have so far rejected Trump’s novel claim that former presidents enjoy absolute immunity for actions that fall within their official job duties. A panel of appellate judges in Washington ruled earlier in February that U.S. District Judge Tanya Chutkan, who would preside over the election interference trial, was right to say that the case could proceed and that Trump can be prosecuted for actions undertaken while in the White House and in the run-up to Jan. 6, 2021, when a mob of his supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol.

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The issue reached the high court because the appeals court refused to grant the delay that Trump has sought.

The case is separate from the high court’s consideration of Trump’s appeal to remain on the presidential ballot despite attempts to kick him off because of his efforts following his election loss in 2020. During arguments on Feb. 8, the court seemed likely to side with Trump. A decision could come any time.

The high court also will hear an appeal in April from one of the more than 1,200 people charged in the Capitol riot. The case could upend a charge prosecutors have brought against more than 300 people, including Trump.

The election interference case in Washington is one of four prosecutions Trump faces as he seeks to reclaim the White House. Of those, the only one with a trial date that seems poised to hold is his state case in New York, where he’s charged with falsifying business records in connection with hush money payments to a porn actor. That case is set for trial in March 25, and a judge this month signaled his determination to press ahead.

A separate case charging him with illegally hoarding classified records is set for trial on May 20, but a pivotal hearing Friday seems likely to result in a delay. No date has been set in a separate state case in Atlanta charging him with scheming to subvert that state’s 2020 election.

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