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Gov. Jay Inslee says Washington will make clear that hospitals must provide emergency abortions

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Gov. Jay Inslee says Washington will make clear that hospitals must provide emergency abortions


SEATTLE — Gov. Jay Inslee on Tuesday said Washington will spell out in state law that hospitals must provide abortions if needed to stabilize patients, a step that comes as the U.S. Supreme Court is expected to rule this month on whether conservative states can bar abortions during some medical emergencies.

There is no indication that patients have been denied emergency abortions in Washington, but the Democrat said during a news conference in Seattle he wanted to remove any doubt that hospitals were required to provide those services if necessary.

“This is a preventative against the Supreme Court decision,” Inslee said. “If your health is going to be damaged in any way as a result of not getting emergency services, you ought to have that right to get those emergency services.”

Most Republican-controlled states have imposed restrictions on abortion since the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade two years ago, eliminating the right to terminate a pregnancy under federal law. Fourteen have banned abortion at all stages of pregnancy with limited exceptions.

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Among them is Idaho, which bans abortion except in life-threatening situations, with doctors subject to felony charges and up to five years in prison for violations. The Biden administration sued to block Idaho’s ban, arguing that federal law requires hospitals that accept Medicare to provide emergency abortions when a patient’s health is threatened, though not necessarily their life.

The Supreme Court has allowed Idaho’s ban to go into effect as it considers the case, with a ruling expected by the end of this month.

Most Democratic-controlled states have adopted laws or issued executive orders seeking to protect abortion access, including Washington, which stocked a three-year supply of abortion medication in case federal court rulings limit its availability.

Washington has also increased funding for reproductive care clinics, barred the State Patrol from cooperating with out-of-state abortion investigations, and adopted a shield law to protect patients who obtain abortions in Washington from extradited to face charges in another state.

Abortion rights advocates say the bans have already affected the emergency care provided to pregnant women. More women whose conditions are typically treated with abortions must now be flown out of state for care, since doctors must wait until they are close to death to provide terminations within the bounds of state law.

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Washington’s administrative code says hospitals must provide emergency services to patients, but so far does not say specifically that includes emergency abortions. Inslee directed the state Department of Health to change that.

“Washington state hospitals are already required by state law to provide emergency care to people experiencing these types of pregnancy complications,” the Washington State Hospital Association said in a written statement Tuesday. “Washington hospitals are providing this care, including to people who have crossed the border from Idaho in need of care.”

The number of women coming to Washington from out of state for abortions since the Supreme Court overturned Roe has jumped by 50%, Inslee said.

Dr. Sarah Prager, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Washington, said Tuesday she has treated patients who have traveled to Washington in the past two years after they were unable to obtain care at home — including one with a preterm rupture of membranes and infected uterus, another with a complicated ectopic pregnancy that was about to burst, and a third who was bleeding from an incomplete miscarriage.

“When I or any doctor has a sick patient in front of me, I shouldn’t have to pause and consult with the hospital’s legal team to figure out if I’m able to act,” Prager said. “These moments wasted can cost patients their health, their future fertility and even their life.”

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Abortion opponents say doctors have mishandled maternal emergency cases and argue that the Biden administration has overstated the danger to undermine state abortion bans.

“We want the highest standard of care for women, and we do make an exception for abortion to save the life of the mother,” including in cases of ectopic pregnancy, said Esther Ripplinger, president of Human Life of Washington. “But when you say ‘health’ is threatened — that’s an interesting proposal, because now, ‘health’ can mean, ‘Oh, I’ve got a headache, I need an abortion.’ … We need to be very specific about what is that emergency and what is not.”

___

Associated Press reporter Geoff Mulvihill contributed from Cherry Hill, New Jersey.



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Washington

Euro 2024 bracket and knockout round schedule

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Euro 2024 bracket and knockout round schedule


The Euro 2024 knockout-round bracket is starting to take shape, with Group A the first to finish play on a dramatic Sunday.

Host Germany got a stoppage-time goal from substitute Niclas Füllkrug to earn a 1-1 draw with Switzerland, clinching first place in the group. Switzerland finished second and also advanced. Hungary, playing at the same time, also got a late goal — in the 10th minute of stoppage time — to earn a 1-0 win over Scotland and a third-place finish in the group.

The top two teams in each group, along with the top four third-place finishers, advance to the 16-team knockout round, meaning Hungary will have to wait to see if its three points are enough. Ties are broken first by head-to-head results — or results against all the level teams, in case of a multi-team tie — followed by goal differential and total goals scored. Beyond that, the calculations get more complicated.

Group B will wrap up Monday. Groups C and D will finish play Tuesday, while Groups E and F will end the group stage Wednesday. The tournament’s knockout stage commences with round of 16 games beginning Saturday.

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In addition to Germany and Switzerland, Spain and Portugal have already clinched spots in the knockout round.

All days and times Eastern.

Monday’s Euro 2024 games

  • Albania vs. Spain, 3 p.m.
  • Croatia vs. Italy, 3 p.m.

Group B, considered one of the most challenging in the tournament, concludes Monday, and neither Croatia nor Italy is in a comfortable position. Italy, the defending champion, lost to Spain previously and needs at least a draw against Croatia to ensure passage to the knockout round. Aging Croatia is still led by Real Madrid star Luka Modric but enters Monday ranked last in the group.

Spain, meanwhile, has impressed thus far and is yet to concede a goal. La Roja has already clinched first place in the group. Albania scored first in each of its first two games but likely needs an unlikely win over Spain to advance.

Groups C and D both conclude Tuesday, as the tournament barrels toward the knockout stage. Group D will finish first, with France meeting Poland at noon Eastern and the Netherlands facing Austria at the same time. Poland has yet to record a point and was the first team eliminated from the tournament, while the Netherlands and Austria are both in strong position to advance. France will finish in the top two with at least a draw against Poland, or with a loss and a Netherlands win or draw.

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In Group C, Denmark faces Serbia and England meets Slovenia, both at 3 p.m. Eastern. England is assured a top-two finish with a draw or win against Slovenia, or with a Denmark draw or loss against Serbia. Denmark is guaranteed passage with a win, but has plenty of other paths. Slovenia will also advance with a win, while Serbia — which enters in last place — needs at least a win, or a draw and a Slovenia loss, to have a chance.

Looking ahead at the rest of Euro 2024

Here’s a look at the rest of the tournament schedule. All dates and times Eastern.



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Blair business, Washington County discuss preparing for looming flood threat

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Blair business, Washington County discuss preparing for looming flood threat


BLAIR, Neb. (WOWT) – With officials on alert for rising waters on the Missouri River, 6 News checked in with Blair.

Staff with the Cottonwood Cove Marina and RV Resort, which is right along the river, said they have been keeping an eye on conditions since Friday, and that the National Weather Service has been doing a good job keeping staff up to date.

Owner Mike Lupardus told 6 News they began having people move their more than 130 RVs to the higher campground Friday, and he expects them to finish that by Sunday. He said that was affecting 300 people.

Lupardus said they were there for the 2019 floods, and that did more than $800,000 in damage.

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But he feels that was a different animal from what they’re preparing for now.

“It sounds like our crest here is going to be around Wednesday, so we’ve got some time to continue to make preparations for this high water,” Lupardus said. “It looks like it’s going to be a quick event—an up and down—where ‘19, you know, it lasted months and months.”

The Washington County Sheriff’s Office said so far, they’ve only set barricades at the wayside for when they would use them to close off roads in the event of a flood.

6 News also reached out to Washington County Emergency Management. We’ll bring you updates once we hear about their plans.

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Netanyahu again claims the US is withholding arms shipments, days after Washington denies it

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Netanyahu again claims the US is withholding arms shipments, days after Washington denies it


TEL AVIV – Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu told his Cabinet on Sunday that there had been a “dramatic drop” in U.S. weapons deliveries for Israel’s war effort in Gaza, doubling down on a claim that the Biden administration has denied and underscoring the growing strains between the two allies.

Netanyahu told his Cabinet that the drop had occurred four months ago, without specifying which weapons, saying only that “certain items arrived sporadically but the munitions at large remained behind.”

The spat highlights how high tensions have surged between Israel and Washington over the war in Gaza, particularly surrounding the Israeli military’s conduct in the beleaguered territory and the harm to civilian life there. President Joe Biden has delayed delivering certain heavy bombs since May over those concerns, but his administration fought back last week against Netanyahu’s charges that other shipments had also been affected.

Netanyahu told the Cabinet that he was driven to release a video in English last week after weeks of unsuccessful pleas with American officials to speed up deliveries. He said a resolution appeared close.

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“In light of what I have heard over the past day, I hope and believe that this matter will be solved soon,” he said, without elaborating.

Netanyahu’s video last week sparked an uproar among critics in Israel and was met with denial and confusion from White House officials. White House national security spokesman John Kirby said the U.S. was “perplexed” by Netanyahu’s claims. White House press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre said, “We generally do not know what he’s talking about.”

His remarks came hours after Israeli Defense Minister Yoav Gallant traveled to Washington for meetings with senior officials. A statement from Gallant’s office said he would discuss “maintaining Israel’s qualitative edge in the region” but made no mention of the weapons issue.

The war in Gaza, which was sparked by Hamas’ Oct. 7 attack on southern Israel, has tested the U.S.-Israel relationship like never before. While the U.S. has staunchly supported Israel’s aims of freeing hostages taken into Gaza and defeating Hamas, it has grown increasingly concerned over the rising Palestinian death toll and the humanitarian crisis created by the war.

Biden has felt pressure from progressive Democrats to take a tougher line against Israel, and he has sharpened his warnings to Netanyahu over military tactics in the Gaza Strip. But after threatening to impose a more sweeping ban on arms transfers over an assault on Rafah, the administration has avoided any suggestion that Israel’s expanding push into the southern Gaza city has crossed a red line.

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During an election year, Biden is also facing critics on the right who say he has moderated his support for an essential Mideast ally.

For Netanyahu, the growing daylight with the U.S. also poses political risks and opportunities. His critics see the public spats as the result of a leader prepared to wreck important alliances and tarnish Israel’s image in the world for political gain.

But the rift grants the long-serving leader a chance to show his base that he isn’t beholden to the U.S. and that he is putting Israel’s interests first.

Copyright 2024 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.



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