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Buy Tickets for San Jose State vs. Utah State on March 6

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Buy Tickets for San Jose State vs. Utah State on March 6


Wednesday’s MWC schedule includes the San Jose State Spartans (9-18, 2-12 MWC) versus the Utah State Aggies (22-5, 10-4 MWC), at 10:30 PM ET on CBS Sports Network.

If you’re looking to attend this game in person, head to StubHub or Ticketmaster to purchase your tickets!

San Jose State vs. Utah State Game Information

Watch college basketball, other live sports and more on Fubo! Use our link to sign up for a free trial.

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Rep your team with officially licensed college basketball gear! Head to Fanatics to find jerseys, shirts, and much more.

San Jose State Players to Watch

  • Myron Amey Jr.: 15.7 PTS, 4.8 REB, 3.0 AST, 1.6 STL, 0.4 BLK
  • Alvaro Cardenas Torre: 12.9 PTS, 3.4 REB, 5.5 AST, 1.0 STL, 0.2 BLK
  • Tibet Gorener: 12.3 PTS, 4.1 REB, 0.7 AST, 0.5 STL, 0.3 BLK
  • Trey Anderson: 11.2 PTS, 4.2 REB, 1.1 AST, 0.5 STL, 0.7 BLK
  • Adrame Diongue: 4.8 PTS, 4.3 REB, 0.8 AST, 0.5 STL, 1.5 BLK

Catch college basketball action all season long on Fubo!

Utah State Players to Watch

  • Great Osobor: 17.8 PTS, 9.1 REB, 3.0 AST, 1.2 STL, 1.4 BLK
  • Darius Brown II: 11.9 PTS, 4.1 REB, 6.3 AST, 1.5 STL, 0.2 BLK
  • Mason Falslev: 11.3 PTS, 4.4 REB, 2.5 AST, 1.4 STL, 0.2 BLK
  • Ian Martinez: 13.2 PTS, 3.7 REB, 1.8 AST, 0.8 STL, 0.9 BLK
  • Josh Uduje: 8.8 PTS, 2.6 REB, 0.9 AST, 0.7 STL, 0.3 BLK

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San Jose State vs. Utah State Stat Comparison

San Jose State Rank San Jose State AVG Utah State AVG Utah State Rank
261st 71.1 Points Scored 79.6 54th
265th 74.7 Points Allowed 69.3 108th
348th 31.3 Rebounds 36.6 117th
327th 6.8 Off. Rebounds 8.1 240th
64th 8.6 3pt Made 6.1 297th
148th 13.5 Assists 16.8 22nd
69th 10.1 Turnovers 11.0 135th

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Utah students aim to tow planes to the gate with a battery-powered, fuel-saving vehicle

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Utah students aim to tow planes to the gate with a battery-powered, fuel-saving vehicle


UVU seniors unveiled a ‘tug’ that could help planes get to the gate without burning precious fuel.

(Francisco Kjolseth | The Salt Lake Tribune) Utah Valley University students test a new prototype electric-powered, autonomous aircraft tug, during a demo at Provo Airport on Friday, April 12, 2024. The tug would cut down on airplanes needing to start their engines early by moving them around at busy airports and reducing emissions and jet fuel costs.

Provo • Their four-wheeled contraption had worked perfectly before reporters showed up, Utah Valley University students promised, as they tinkered with it at the Provo Airport.

The creation, a welded frame encased in two wooden compartments roughly the size of coffee tables and powered by two electric engines, was supposed to tow the Diamond DA40 XLT — a single-engine prop plane weighing around 2,500 pounds — hitched to it.

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It worked for a minute during its public debut Friday, before a broken sprocket — the metal wheel over which engine chains run — immobilized the machine for the rest of the day. But it would likely be an easy fix, UVU professor and project mentor Brett Stone said, and what is engineering if not a series of problems to solve?

Someone else’s problem, the students chimed in — this is likely as far as they’ll take this project before handing it off to the next capstone class — but a solvable one. And if it works, this student-led invention could revolutionize the airport taxiing process.

This model was just the prototype, a culmination of a school year’s worth of work from UVU engineering and computer science seniors. When it works — which it had just this morning, students repeated — it will be able to tow airplanes to and from their gates, controlled remotely by airport ground crews, pilots and its own autonomous driving abilities.

The traditional taxiing process, Stone said, is noisy, dangerous and wasteful. It requires planes to burn precious fuel and asks tarmac employees to come dangerously close to the spinning blades of aircraft engines.

“Jet engines are meant to be at 30,000 feet,” Stone said. “They’re not meant to push things around on the ground. And so, the way engineers think, I guess, I was like, ‘There’s got to be a better way.’”

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The goal is to build a “tug,” as the contraption is called, robust enough to taxi commercial jets — and bring it to market.

Aircraft tugs aren’t new — but fully electric, remote-controlled ones with the capacity to tow a commercial jet could be the industry’s next frontier. There’s a patent application pending for this specific model, Stone said, and future senior capstone classes will help scale it for commercial use. A commercial product could be ready in the next two years, Stone said.

(Francisco Kjolseth | The Salt Lake Tribune) Utah Valley University computer science student Cache Fulton uses a controller to pilot an autonomous, electric-powered aircraft tug during a demo at Provo Airport on Friday, April 12, 2024. The tug would cut down on airplanes needing to start their engines early by moving them around at busy airports and reducing emissions and jet fuel costs.

“It’d be really cool to see it progress, to see it reach the full-size Boeing airline capacity,” said UVU graduating senior Kolby Hargett. “I think another year from now, [future students] can get started scaling it into something larger, now that the idea’s here and a lot of the ground work’s done.”

This was a first-of-its-kind collaboration between graduating seniors in UVU’s engineering and computer science departments. Engineers, like Ammon Traden, worked on the design and the mechanics. Computer scientists, like Cache Fulton and Riley Pinkham, figured out the software. Their combined skillset was what it took to turn Stone’s vision into a real, operable product.

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“We were blessed that Kolby knows so much about electricity,” Traden said. “He helped us so much with this.”

It’s also the most ambitious capstone project UVU engineering students have undertaken, said professor and mentor Matt Jensen — and the most practical. Students will enter the job market with real-world experience and a demonstrable, physical product they can say they built from the ground up.

“While it’s not perfect, and obviously it did have its challenges today, I think just recognizing … that they’re about to graduate and go into the industry, I feel very confident that they’ll be good engineers.”

And one day in the near future, the students imagine, they might get to sit on a plane being towed by something they helped create.

“Next, we’re going to come for the plane,” Fulton said.

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(Francisco Kjolseth | The Salt Lake Tribune) Utah Valley University students and professor Matt Jensen (center) troubleshoot a sprocket failure on a new prototype electric-powered, autonomous aircraft tug, during a demo at Provo Airport on Friday, April 12, 2024. The tug would cut down on airplanes needing to start their engines early by moving them around at busy airports and reducing emissions and jet fuel costs.

Shannon Sollitt is a Report for America corps member covering business accountability and sustainability for The Salt Lake Tribune. Your donation to match our RFA grant helps keep her writing stories like this one; please consider making a tax-deductible gift of any amount today by clicking here.



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As the Utah Jazz season winds down, jealousy sets in

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As the Utah Jazz season winds down, jealousy sets in


LOS ANGELES — During the home stretch of this 2023-24 NBA season, the Los Angeles Clippers have been after homecourt advantage in the first round of the playoffs.

Fighting between the fourth and fifth spot in the Western Conference, it had come down to the last few games of the year, and just a few hours before their game against the Utah Jazz tipped off on Friday night, their fate had not been settled.

It looked like it was going to be a perfect night for another lesson in urgency for the Jazz’s young core.

“It’s gonna be fun for us to feel what a desperate team at a different level plays like,” Jazz head coach Will Hardy said two hours before the game started, “because the Clippers are playing for something.

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“Tonight’s game is important to them. It’s going to be another moment of learning for our team. This is a team that’s in a place that we want to get to and we’re about to feel what it feels like to be on the court with a team that’s at that level.”

But, as fate would have it, the Clippers were able to secure the fourth seed in the West before their game against the Jazz even began. With the Dallas Mavericks dropping a game to the Detroit Pistons, Clippers coach Tyronn Lue was able to breathe a little easier and give some of his stars rest.

With Kawhi Leonard watching in street clothes nursing a sore right knee so he can be ready to go when the playoffs start, the Clippers only played James Harden 9 minutes, 58 seconds on Friday night.

Russell Westbrook was on the court for exactly 9 minutes, Paul George for just 8:24 and Terance Mann for 5:06.

“The Clippers pulled the plug at some point on some of their starters,” Hardy said, “so yeah, you obviously don’t get to feel it in the way that we discussed pregame, so then you move on to a different a different message, which is it’s an opportunity for us to play a game, get better, compete and go try to win.

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“You know, nobody’s made any excuses for us when we’ve lost, so you play who’s on the floor, play as hard as you can.”

To their credit, the Jazz fought like crazy to get the 110-109 win and they did it despite shooting just 17.1% from 3-point range, in large part thanks to the versatility of Kenneth Lofton Jr., who nearly had a triple-double with 27 points, nine rebounds and eight assists.

But the truth is the Jazz were playing against the deep bench rotation of the Clippers and had to fight their hardest even then to get the win.

The Jazz didn’t end up playing a desperate team on Friday night. Instead, they were playing yet another team that could relax against them and get some of their deeper bench players some run knowing that they are headed to the postseason, a place the Jazz aren’t anywhere close to being.

On Tuesday, when the Jazz faced the Denver Nuggets, Denver head coach Michael Malone fielded questions about playoff rotations and trust in different players at big moments.

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On Friday, Lue was discussing priorities over the coming days as the Clippers prepare for a postseason run and on Sunday, the Jazz will play against the Golden State Warriors, a highly decorated and playoff experienced team that is looking well past what the Jazz will bring.

“I’m deeply jealous of everybody that’s preparing for the playoffs right now,” Hardy said. “So are our players. That’s where we want to be…I’ve been in the playoffs. Out of my 15 years in the NBA I think 12 years.

“There’s nothing like it. There’s nothing like preparing for a series, there’s nothing like the chess match that goes on there, the adjustments game to game.”

There’s nothing like it, and the Jazz will once again have to live with watching from home.



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Utah still an economic powerhouse but some of the glimmer is fading

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Utah still an economic powerhouse but some of the glimmer is fading


Utah government and business leaders united at a Friday gathering to celebrate the state’s high-flying economy, including a plaudit earlier this week from The Wall Street Journal that named the Salt Lake metropolitan area the country’s top spot for jobs, but also cautioned that rising challenges must be addressed to keep the mojo rising.

At the One Utah Summit held in downtown Salt Lake City, the event formerly branded as the Governor’s Economic Summit, Natalie Gochnour, associate dean for the University of Utah’s David Eccles School of Business and director of the Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute, gave her annual rundown of the state’s economic highs and lows for the past year and some things to keep an eye on in the days ahead.

A bumpy road ahead?

Gochnour noted that while Utah’s economic growth has been following a yearslong trend outpacing the national average, the last few months have seen those tracking lines converge and Utah has been knocked from its perch as the nation’s growth leader, now finding itself trailing six other states on that metric. And two of the job sectors that once represented bragging points for Utah, high tech and financial services, have seen negative momentum in recent reports.

Gochnour said Utah’s population growth, and a change in dynamics when it comes to how that growth is fueled, has put extra strain across a number of critical areas including congestion, air quality and, perhaps most significantly, housing prices. Utah, she said, has come out on the positive side of net migration in 32 of the past 33 years, adding 650,000 new residents. And the housing needs of those newcomers have helped tip the market into a supply deficit, and resultant price surges.

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Gov. Spencer Cox shared his own concerns about the current state of the housing industry in Utah.

“The single greatest threat to our people is the untenable price of attainable housing,” he said. “If you can’t afford to live here, you’re not going to start a business here.”

The state of startups

There are also plenty of positives, including the state’s nation-leading job participation rate, healthy wage growth and an economic expansion that, while it may have cooled off, is still running well into positive territory.

The state is also tops in the nation when it comes to best places to start a business, according to Utah’s entrepreneur-in-residence Brad Bonham.

Bonham, a veteran entrepreneur and business educator, said those who launch their business enterprises in Utah are 70% more likely to build those endeavors to the vaunted “unicorn” status, a term coined by the tech industry for companies that reach the $1 billion valuation level. He also touted the debut of the Startup State Initiative and associated website that provides a step-by-step guide, along with a slew of resources, for those looking to start a business in Utah.

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Salt Lake Chamber president and CEO Derek Miller said the same formula that helped Utah achieve its current high performance economy will help it navigate the growing pains that have accompanied success: planning, foresight and ingenuity in the private sector.

“Private sector innovation along with public sector support, that will unleash the power of free enterprise,” he said.

Business ‘Jeopardy’

Virginia Pearce, director of the Utah Film Commission, touched on the state’s historic, and ongoing, success as a destination venue for filmmakers looking for unique landscapes and local talent while representatives of some of Utah’s emerging industries gathered for a round of custom-themed “Jeopardy.”

Some answers, and subsequent correct questions, from the ad-lib competition:

Answer: “This university had the first ARPANET node outside of California.”

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Question: “What is the University of Utah?”

Answer: “These three states have the highest density of life sciences employees.”

Question: “What are Massachusetts, New Jersey and Utah?”

Answer: “At $780 million, this was the largest exit for a life science company in Utah.”

Question: “What is Tolero Pharmaceuticals?”

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Answer: “This person became known as the ‘father of computer graphics’ while at the University of Utah.”

Question: “Who is Evan Sutherland?”

Answer: “Over the next decade, more of Utah’s economy will be shaped by these four industry segments at an accelerated pace.”

Question: “What are aerospace, defense, cybersecurity and space exploration?”



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