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San Francisco Giants 2024 season preview: Projected lineup, rotation and whether there’s ever enough pitching

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San Francisco Giants 2024 season preview: Projected lineup, rotation and whether there’s ever enough pitching


The San Francisco Giants have slipped from 107 wins in 2021 to 81 in 2022 to 79 last season. In an attempt to arrest this pattern of decline, lead decision-maker Farhan Zaidi has positioned the Giants as one of the most active teams of the winter. To improve his club’s chances of getting back in the playoffs — likely via wild-card berth given that they share division with the Dodgers — Zaidi has signed the likes of Jung Hoo Lee, Matt Chapman, Jorge Soler, Jordan Hicks, and, just this week, Blake Snell, among others. As well, the Giants swung a trade for Robbie Ray and replaced Gabe Kapler in the dugout with new manager Bob Melvin. That’s a lot of churn and investment, and there’s mounting pressure for those moves to pay off and, yes, yield a postseason berth. 

Will that happen? A deeper dive into the current state of the 2024 Giants may shed some light. Let’s undertake that right now. 

Win total projection, odds

  • 2023 record: 79-83 (fourth in NL West)
  • 2024 SportsLine win total over/under: 82.5 
  • World Series odds (via SportsLine): +6000

Projected lineup

  1. Jung Hoo Lee, CF
  2. Thairo Estrada, 2B
  3. LaMonte Wade Jr., 1B
  4. Jorge Soler, DH
  5. Michael Conforto, LF
  6. Matt Chapman, 3B
  7. Mike Yastrzemski, RF
  8. Patrick Bailey, C
  9. Marco Luciano, SS

Last season, the Giants ranked 24th in MLB in runs scored and 26th in OPS. That obviously needs to improve, and the hope for the Giants is that Lee gives them a much-needed dose of OBP and contact at the top of the lineup — more on that in a moment. Meantime, Soler and Chapman should improve the Giants’ problems versus lefties and in terms of power. It’s entirely possible that veteran NRI Nick Ahmed emerges as the starting shortstop, at least to start the season. 

Projected rotation

  1. Logan Webb, RHP
  2. Blake Snell, LHP
  3. Kyle Harrison, LHP
  4. Jordan Hicks, RHP
  5. Keaton Winn, RHP

The San Fran rotation in 2023 placed 10th in MLB with an ERA of 4.12. That rotation also ranked an impressive fourth in the majors with a K/BB ratio of 3.84. Notable losses from last year include Anthony DeSclafani, Sean Manaea, Alex Wood, and Jakob Junis. 

Projected bullpen

  • Closer: RHP Camilo Doval
  • Setup: RHP Tyler Rogers, LHP Taylor Rogers, RHP Luke Jackson
  • Middle: RHP Ryan Walker, LHP Juan Sanchez
  • Long: RHP Daulton Jefferies

Last year’s pen was 14th in MLB with a relief ERA of 3.92 and fourth with a relief K/BB ratio of 3.03. Like all teams, there’s been a substantial level of bullpen turnover. There’s really no call for such details, though, just as there’s no call for further discussion of the Giants’ bullpen. It will probably be fine, much like you. 

Is there enough starting pitching?

Logan Webb is a certifiable ace at the front end, and the late signing of reigning Cy Young winner Blake Snell gives them a true co-ace. But what about the remainder of the Giants’ rotation for 2024? As noted, Manaea, Wood, Junis, and DeSclafani are gone, and they were all varying degrees of useful last season across a combined 44 starts. Hicks is new to the fold, and he’s got one of the biggest fastballs (sinker, actually) in the game today. However, Hicks is primarily a reliever, and the only time he tried his hand at starting the results over eight starts for the Cardinals in 2022 were hardly encouraging. It’s difficult to imagine Hicks this season will be able to handle a starter’s workload while also being effective. 

Elsewhere, Robbie Ray probably won’t be available until the second half of the season as he continues his recovery from Tommy John surgery. Right-hander Tristan Beck recently underwent vascular surgery after being diagnosed with an aneurysm in his upper arm. He’s still weeks from even throwing, and he doesn’t yet have a timetable for his return. Alex Cobb is still recovering from offseason hip surgery, and Keaton Winn is well behind schedule after suffering elbow discomfort early in spring training. It should be apparent that the Giants have serious depth concerns, mostly because of all those injuries.

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Will Lee give the Giants what they need at the top of the order?

The Giants’ priciest move of the offseason was the six-year, $113 million pact they forged with Korean outfielder Jung Hoo Lee. Lee, to state the obvious, is vital to the Giants’ hopes in 2024 and beyond. He’ll man the critical position of center, and the hope is that he’ll give San Fran on-base skills as the leadoff hitter. Lee has good bat-to-ball skills and plate discipline, but the question is how his power — or lack thereof — will translate in making the leap from KBO to MLB. His maximum exit velocity makes him a peer of Andrew Benintendi and Robbie Grossman, and if you exclude his 23-homer effort in 2022, Lee averaged just seven home runs per season in his other six years in the KBO. Generally speaking, hitters do not add power when jumping from the KBO to MLB. This isn’t to say that the Giants need Lee to be a leading home run threat at the No. 1 spot, but they do need him to drive the ball enough to be a viable hitter. The guess here is that Lee will pass muster, but it’s a bit of an unknown going into 2024. 

What would make for a successful season?

Before he inked an extension in late October through the 2026 season, Zaidi was presumed to be under some degree of pressure following a second-straight middling campaign and repeated failures to land a marquee free agent. So, no, Zaidi’s job very likely doesn’t hinge upon getting the Giants back to the postseason this year, but there does seem to be a level of impatience with regard to their on-field results. As such, the Giants need to be part of the 2024 playoff fray in order for this season to be a success. As noted above, there’s almost no chance that they’ll win the NL West, not with the juggernaut Dodgers around. The expanded 12-team playoff field means there’s now a third wild-card spot in each league, so that lowers the bar. Still, the Diamondbacks, Padres, Phillies, one or more NL Central teams, and possibly even the Mets figure to have realistic designs on a wild-card spot, which means it’s probably going to be a competitive jumble for those three spots. It’ll be a challenge for the Giants, but they need to make it happen. 





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San Francisco, CA

Plan for San Francisco housing development could center around Stonestown Galleria

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Plan for San Francisco housing development could center around Stonestown Galleria


San Francisco appears headed for its first mega-project housing development since the pandemic.

The Stonestown Galleria may soon be home for thousands of new residents as officials look to turn shopping malls into living spaces.

While a lot of shopping malls are struggling, Stonestown Galleria in San Francisco is doing well. But there are those who think it could do even better.

“There’s a number of malls and shopping centers and shopping centers in the Bay Area that are currently contemplated to be transformed into new neighborhoods,” said Daniel Saver, a regional government planning director. “There’s a national trend right now to re-imagine old shopping malls, many of which often have a lot of surface parking.” 

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It’s the parking lots surrounding Stonestown that have officials so interested. The city has been in talks with the owner to turn many of the spaces to park into places to live.

Brookfield Properties has a plan to develop 3,500 housing units surrounding the existing mall, including six acres of parks, outdoor dining, recreation space and a plaza for a local farmer’s market. Much of the car traffic would be sent to underground parking garages.

The idea is to turn the shopping mall into a small, walkable, town center, with residents giving the area more life at night.

“We can create really vibrant spaces that have different feelings during the daytime and the evening,” said Saver. “But during the course of the whole day, they’re actually widely used by a variety of different people.” 

Ironically, Stonestown was ahead of its time. When it opened in 1952, it actually offered high-density housing.

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And old newspaper ad lists a three-bedroom, two-bath apartment going for $159 a month. Later, indoor malls became regional shopping destinations with customers arriving in cars.

And even though much of the rear parking lot now sits empty, some current customers don’t want to see the surface parking go away.

“Please don’t take the parking away. It’s silly,” said shopper Angela Fonda, who lives near Stonestown. “It’s just, you know, one more way to get revenue for the city. All sorts of crazy ideas going on right now. I just think it’s fine the way it is.”

But a man named Yoram didn’t think so. He rode his bike to the mall, and while he agreed convenient parking was nice, he supports the plan.

“But housing is more important,” he said, “because homelessness is a terrific problem. And housing is unaffordable.”  

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College student Michael Brown doesn’t think it will help with that. Though 20 percent of the units would be affordable, Brown thought all that new “vibrancy” would simply make the pre-existing housing in the area more expensive.

“It would drive up pricing around apartments, for sure, much more than it is already costing,” he said. “We still see that low-income people can’t afford to stay in the SF Bay Area. I don’t think adding more is going to solve our current issue.”

San Francisco has been closely involved with the plan for Stonestown, and officials even requested that 600 more units be added to the original project.  

Final approval rests with the Board of Supervisors. There are no easy answers to what ails the housing market. But with cities desperately looking for spaces to build more homes, those parking lots are looking more and more like an opportunity.

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San Francisco Giants’ Struggling Ace Will Miss Time With Injury

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San Francisco Giants’ Struggling Ace Will Miss Time With Injury


Things are going from bad to worse for Blake Snell as the San Francisco Giants announced that they are placing him on the injured list with an abductor strain.

The two-time Cy Young winner has been off to a miserable start to his San Francisco career and now will have to spend some time away on the 15-day IL as he deals with the injury. For the corresponding move, the team is recalling Landen Roupp from the Sacramento River Cats.

The immediate fix, as Snell was slated to pitch against the New York Mets on Wednesday afternoon, will be a bullpen game. Ryan Walker will get the start in his place, as reported by the SF Chronicle’s Shayna Rubin.

Maybe some time away from the team will be good for the 31-year-old. He has an ERA of 11.57 through his first three outings. The lefty didn’t sign with the team until March 19 and didn’t spend any time in the minor leagues to get acclimated back into the groove of pitching.

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Roupp, 25, made his major league debut earlier this season and has a 4.35 ERA so far. He was a 12th round draft selection by the Giants in the 2021 MLB draft and will now return to the show.

San Francisco is still squarely in the race for both their division and the wild card, but sitting at 12-13 they will need to find some success over the next couple of weeks without Snell. Just as important, they need him to comeback from his injury playing at a higher level than he has been.

No one doubts that he still has the talent to be a top pitcher in the league, he won the Cy Young just last season, he just needs to find that consistency again.



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Man stabs parishioner, says ‘Jesus is not real,’ outside San Francisco church during confirmations – OSV News

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Man stabs parishioner, says ‘Jesus is not real,’ outside San Francisco church during confirmations – OSV News


(OSV News) — parishioner was stabbed outside a historic San Francisco church April 21, where the city’s Archbishop Salvatore J. Cordileone was administering the sacrament of confirmation.

The San Francisco Police Department told OSV News that officers arrived just before 1 p.m. Sunday at Sts. Peter and Paul Church, where an adult male was found “suffering from an apparent stab wound.”

The victim was then taken to the hospital with non-life-threatening injuries, said police.

A 25-year-old suspect named Marko Asaulyuk was arrested and booked into San Francisco County Jail, charged with attempted murder and eight counts of assault with a deadly weapon, police told OSV News. Asaulyuk remains behind bars. Police did not provide information on a motive for the attack.

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An April 22 post on X (formerly Twitter) by local crime reporter Henry K. Lee shows images of police taking into custody a handcuffed, blond-haired white male wearing a red jacket and long black shorts, whom Lee said was Asaulyuk.

Local media reported that the suspect, who was believed to be without a fixed residence, had entered the church — at which a large congregation was present — prior to the attack. Due to safety concerns, he was escorted outside.

Unnamed witnesses told local media the man then accosted an unidentified individual, saying, “Jesus is not real,” and shortly thereafter stabbed the victim, whose wife called emergency services. Several people detained the suspect until police arrived.

OSV News is awaiting a response to its request for comment from the Archdiocese of San Francisco and from the parish staff of Sts. Peter and Paul.

The parish traces its foundation to 1884, with its first church destroyed by the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire. The current church, known for its iconic twin spires, was completed in 1924. The parish is administered by the Salesians of St. John Bosco, who along with the Daughters of Mary Help of Christians serve the area’s young people, elders and Chinese communities, as well as a growing number of tourists and persons experiencing homelessness and poverty.

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Gina Christian is a multimedia reporter for OSV News. Follow her on X (formerly Twitter) at @GinaJesseReina.



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