Connect with us

San Francisco, CA

San Francisco 49ers players admit they didn’t know new Super Bowl overtime rules following loss to Chiefs – Boston News, Weather, Sports | WHDH 7News

Published

on

San Francisco 49ers players admit they didn’t know new Super Bowl overtime rules following loss to Chiefs – Boston News, Weather, Sports | WHDH 7News


(CNN) — Super Bowl LVIII came down to the wire. Sixty minutes of action couldn’t separate the Kansas City Chiefs and the San Francisco 49ers and so the Super Bowl went to overtime.

Hindsight is a wonderful thing, but the 49ers’ decision to take first possession in overtime has come under scrutiny given San Francisco’s defeat.

The 49ers won the coin toss and chose to have first possession. With it, they scored a field goal. Then it was the Kansas City Chiefs’ turn. A 14-play, 75-yard drive ensued and culminated in a three-yard touchdown pass from Patrick Mahomes to Mecole Hardman to crown the Chiefs and give them their third Super Bowl title in five seasons.

Although San Francisco coach Kyle Shanahan said he had discussed a possible overtime coin toss scenario before Super Bowl LVIII with his analytics team, a number of 49ers players have admitted that they weren’t aware that overtime rules had been changed for playoffs games.

Advertisement

Previously, the team who had the first possession of overtime could win with a touchdown on the opening drive. However the new rule states that both teams are guaranteed at least one possession.

“You know what? I didn’t even realize the playoff rules were different in overtime,” 49ers full back Kyle Juszczyk told reporters. “I assume you just want the ball to score a touchdown and win.

“I guess that’s not the case. I don’t totally know the strategy there. We hadn’t talked about it, no.”

San Francisco defensive lineman Arik Armstead admitted that he didn’t know about the postseason overtime rules until they put them on the big screen at Allegiant Stadium.

“They put it on the scoreboard, and everyone was like ‘Oh, even if you score, they get a chance still,’” Armstead told reporters, per ESPN.

Advertisement

Conversely, the Chiefs players explained that they’d been talking about the rule change all year so were prepared for the big moment.

“We’ve talked about it all year,” Chiefs safety Justin Reid said, per ESPN.
“We talked about it in training camp about how the rules were different in regular season versus the playoffs. Every week of the playoffs we talked about the overtime rule.”

Kansas City defensive lineman Chris Jones called the 49ers “crazy” for deciding to take the ball first, given the possible implications.

Chiefs head coach Andy Reid told reporters after the victory that if he had won the coin toss, his team would have kicked the ball off to begin overtime, a decision they came to after consultation with the team’s analytics department.

“It can go either way, but the one thing it does, it gives you an opportunity to see what you’ve got to do and they came down and scored three points, you’ve either got to score three or you’ve got to get a touchdown,” Reid explained.

Advertisement

“The one thing that people didn’t realize is that clock keeps going. So we were down low there but you’re fixing to start a new quarter, so the game wasn’t over in a tie. That wasn’t happening, not in the playoffs. And so we would, we would keep playing.

“And it’s a unique rule. It doesn’t get used very often. But I think it was great for the National Football League. It was great for the viewers of the National Football League. I mean, they got an extra quarter of football and people love this thing. It’s a great sport and people love watching it, especially with the competition level so high.”

What are the overtime rules in the postseason?

According to NFL rules for the playoffs, both teams are guaranteed an opportunity to possess the ball at least once, even if the team receiving the kickoff scores a touchdown. The game can only end sooner if the team that kicks off the period forces a safety on the receiving team’s initial possession.

Teams play a 15-minute period. Once both teams have had an opportunity to possess the ball, whichever team takes the lead next will win the game.

The rule was changed following a game in the 2022 postseason when the Chiefs beat the Buffalo Bills 42-36 by winning the coin toss and scoring a touchdown with the first possession, ending the match with the Bills never getting an opportunity to reply.

Advertisement

The ending of the AFC divisional round matchup between the Chiefs and the Bills shined a light on the rule, with some fans declaring it the worst in sports.

Previously, the team that received the opening kickoff in overtime would win the game if they scored a touchdown on their first possession.

The NFL’s overtime rules now are more similar those of college football, which many had argued were fairer.

(Copyright (c) 2023 CNN. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.)

Join our Newsletter for the latest news right to your inbox
Advertisement



Source link

San Francisco, CA

SF Giants manager Bob Melvin requiring everyone in team's dugout to stand during national anthem

Published

on

SF Giants manager Bob Melvin requiring everyone in team's dugout to stand during national anthem


SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) — San Francisco Giants manager Bob Melvin is now requiring everyone in the team’s dugout to stand during the national anthem.

Melvin says the decision is more about letting the other team know that the black and orange are ready to play.

He adds that the same rules applied during his time as manager with the A’s and the Padres.

VIDEO: Giants introduce Bay Area native Bob Melvin as new manager

Advertisement

The San Francisco Giants have hired manager Bob Melvin away from the division rival San Diego Padres.

Melvin occasionally cracked down if he noticed a lack of participation during the national anthem.

He says the team is embracing the policy change.

Bob Melvin, a Bay Area native and former Giants player who also managed a decade in Oakland, was formally announced as San Francisco’s new manager last October, replacing Gabe Kapler.

Now Streaming 24/7 Click Here

If you’re on the ABC7 News app, click here to watch live

Copyright © 2024 KGO-TV. All Rights Reserved.

Advertisement



Source link

Continue Reading

San Francisco, CA

Rare Bay Area Tornado Warning Was First In 13 Years: NWS

Published

on

Rare Bay Area Tornado Warning Was First In 13 Years: NWS


BAY AREA, CA — Despite indications seen on radar and a rare tornado warning for the area, the National Weather Service was unable to confirm that a tornado touched down Saturday in Monterey County.

“We were unable to find damage that would give us a confirmation of a tornado touchdown in spite of strong rotation detected by our radar,” NWS Bay Area wrote on X, formerly known as Twitter, on Sunday evening.

A severe thunderstorm capable of producing a tornado Saturday triggered the first Bay Area tornado warning since 2011, according to the NWS.

The NWS said “a radar velocity loop” showed a rotating thunderstorm with a possible waterspout in the Monterey Bay area before coming ashore near Moss Landing. Forecasters warned pea-sized hail was possible for the area.

Advertisement

The warning was issued at about 6:16 p.m. for the areas of Watsonville, Hollister and Aromas in Santa Cruz, San Benito and Monterey counties. The warning was later extended to include the Elkhorn, Pajaro, Prunedale, Ridgemark and San Juan Bautista areas of Monterey and San Benito counties.

Forecasters advised residents to take cover, avoid windows and move to a basement or an interior room on the lowest floor of a sturdy building. The warning expired at 7 p.m.

“After scouring the area and discussing with the North County Fire Department, the survey crew were unable to find damage that would support a tornado touchdown,” NWS Bay Area said on X. “While survey crews didn’t find any damage, any reports, including pictures or videos are appreciated.”



Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading

San Francisco, CA

Some San Francisco Public Schools Face Closure as Enrollment Plummets

Published

on

Some San Francisco Public Schools Face Closure as Enrollment Plummets


San Francisco’s public school system, grappling with declining enrollment and a looming budget deficit, is set to close or consolidate an unspecified number of schools by fall 2025, Superintendent Matt Wayne announced.

Wayne discussed the plan at a summit Saturday and gave more details in an interview with the Chronicle. “We feel like in order to create the schools our students deserve and our families expect, we need to have fewer schools,” Wayne told the Chronicle’s education reporter, Jill Tucker.

SF public schools currently have about 49,500 students enrolled – down from 53,000 in 2015. Projections show they could lose another 5,000 by 2032.

With fewer students comes decreased state funding, further straining the district’s already stretched resources and the city’s budget crisis. Wayne told the Chronicle that the district faces a “fiscal cliff” after years of overspending. He said the current lack of funds prevents the district form providing consistent support, programs, and necessary repairs across all of SF’s 121 schools. Wayne also noted that the potential for a state takeover if the budget isn’t balanced.

Advertisement

While no specific schools have been identified yet, the district apparently aims to finalize the closure list by September or October 2024, for a potential implementation by fall 2025. The next eight months will reportedly be dedicated to establishing closure criteria, conducting an equity audit to ensure marginalized students aren’t disproportionately affected, and gathering extensive community input.

Feature image via Blackjack48  ♠t ♣c /Wikimedia Commons.



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending