Connect with us

West

San Francisco under fire for program giving booze to homeless alcoholics: 'Where's the recovery in all this?'

Published

on

Join Fox News for access to this content

You have reached your maximum number of articles. Log in or create an account FREE of charge to continue reading.

Please enter a valid email address.

By entering your email and pushing continue, you are agreeing to Fox News’ Terms of Use and Privacy Policy, which includes our Notice of Financial Incentive. To access the content, check your email and follow the instructions provided.

Having trouble? Click here.

A $5 million pilot program bringing free beer, wine and vodka shots to San Francisco’s homeless alcoholics aims to relieve the city’s emergency services, but one addict-turned-recovery advocate says the effort misses the mark and only delays recovery for those who need it.

“It’s not a good idea, not when you consider the fact that, over the last four years, San Francisco spent $20 million to basically service a total of a couple of hundred people… by giving them free vodka and beer. For that amount of money, we could have funded 60 drug treatment beds instead,” Tom Wolf, founder of the Pacific Alliance for Prevention and Recovery, told “Fox & Friends First.”

Advertisement

“You really have to ask, where’s the recovery in all of this? What is the desired outcome of this program? They say it’ll save money, but we just spent $20 million bucks over the last four years. You have to really ask, ‘is it saving money, and is it making a difference?’” 

SAN FRANCISCO BUYS VODKA SHOTS FOR HOMELESS ALCOHOLICS IN TAXPAYER-FUNDED PROGRAM

A San Franciscan program aims to curb emergency room visits and hospital stays by mitigating the effects of alcohol withdrawal with a “Managed Alcohol Program.” (iStock)

The city’s “Managed Alcohol Program” is operated by its Department of Public Health and focuses on administering limited quantities of alcohol to prevent serious side effects of withdrawal.

It’s backed by some experts who say it can save lives. Others like Wolf, meanwhile, insist the taxpayer funds would be better suited for treatment and sobriety programs.

Advertisement

“What also accomplishes that goal is actually drug treatment,” he said of its efficacy. “It may reduce those [emergency] calls and thereby save money but, again, we’re spending $5 million a year to give people free alcohol…” 

BLUE STATE DEMS TURN ON GOVERNOR AS HOMELESS COUNCIL CAN’T ACCOUNT FOR $20B IN SPENDING

People inhabit encampments on the streets of San Francisco's Tenderloin District.

People inhabit encampments on the streets of San Francisco, California on Saturday, April 15, 2023. Homelessness and drug use have been significant concerns for San Francisco. (Flight Risk for Fox News Digital)

Wolf, a recovering heroin addict, once lived on the street. He said a similar program tailored toward his addiction would have either kept him on the street or he would be dead by now.

“I don’t really see what the benefit is of all of this, and I’m glad it was exposed,” he said.

The program also offers life skills classes and cultural outings for patients, the San Francisco Chronicle reported.

Advertisement

The outlet also said the city’s public health department claims to have found a drop in emergency room visits as well as a reduced hospital stays and emergency calls as a result of the program.

Fox News’ Chris Pandolfo contributed to this report.

Read the full article from Here

Advertisement
Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

West

North Carolina is charging ahead of California and the reason why is surprising

Published

on

Join Fox News for access to this content

Plus special access to select articles and other premium content with your account – free of charge.

Please enter a valid email address.

By entering your email and pushing continue, you are agreeing to Fox News’ Terms of Use and Privacy Policy, which includes our Notice of Financial Incentive. To access the content, check your email and follow the instructions provided.

Having trouble? Click here.

NEWYou can now listen to Fox News articles!

Earlier in May, two starkly different fiscal news items highlighted the divergent paths taken by North Carolina and California. While North Carolina celebrated news of projected revenue surpluses in 2024 and 2025, California is grappling with a $44.9 billion budget deficit. How did these two states end up in wildly different places?  

Advertisement

The contrast is emblematic of the philosophies governing these states. North Carolina’s conservative fiscal policies, emphasizing low taxes and restrained spending, widely differ from California’s high tax rates and expansive spending programs. The recent outcomes suggest that North Carolina’s approach offers a model of responsible governance from which other states, including California, could learn. 

North Carolina’s success results from deliberate and sustained conservative fiscal policies. The state embarked on a series of tax reforms, which started in 2013 and were the largest in its history. These reforms included reducing the personal income tax rate from a progressive structure topping out at 7.75% to a flat rate of 4.75%, scheduled to drop further to 3.99% by 2026. Corporate tax rates were also slashed from 6.9% to 2.5% — the lowest in the nation for states that levy such a tax — with plans to phase it out entirely by 2030. 

CALIFORNIA HAS YET TO PROVIDE 1,200 TINY HOMES FOR STATE’S HOMELESS THAT WERE PROMISED IN MARCH 2023

These tax cuts were not merely superficial adjustments but were coupled with prudent spending measures. North Carolina’s general fund spending has been managed to ensure essential services are funded without resorting to excessive borrowing.  

The massively slow and expensive construction of the California bullet train project is photographed in Corcoran, California, left, and Hanford, California, right. (Robert Gauthier/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images | George Rose/Getty Images)

Advertisement

Fiscally conservative policies retired 40% of state debt within a decade, reducing general fund-supported debt from $6.5 billion in 2012 to $3.9 billion by 2021. Moreover, the state has avoided budgetary gimmicks and one-time fixes, focusing instead on long-term fiscal sustainability. 

Spending restraint has been a hallmark of North Carolina’s approach. State legislators have maintained strict controls on spending growth, ensuring expenditures do not outpace revenue. This disciplined approach has allowed North Carolina to build substantial reserves, including a savings reserve (or “Rainy Day Fund”) that currently stands at $4.75 billion, equivalent to just over 15% of the 2023-24 state general fund budget.  

This fiscal prudence has positioned North Carolina to weather economic downturns without resorting to drastic cuts or tax hikes, avoiding volatility in the lives of state workers. 

The result? North Carolina has seen robust economic growth. According to the John Locke Foundation’s 2024 North Carolina Budget, Tax, and Economic Highlights, from 2016 to 2022, North Carolina’s per capita income grew at an average annual rate of 5.3%, higher than the national average and highest among its neighbors. North Carolina’s real GDP increased by a total of 11.4% from 2017 to 2022, which is also higher than the national average. 

In contrast, California has pursued a high-tax, high-spending approach. The state imposes some of the highest tax rates in the country, including a top personal income tax rate of 13.3% and a corporate tax rate of 8.84%. According to the California Policy Center, “In just the last ten years, the General Fund budget has grown by 84 percent after adjusting for inflation and for population growth.”  

Advertisement

California ranked No. 49 in the Fraser Institute’s 2023 economic freedom report, which evaluates states and provinces based on variables such as government spending, taxes, labor market freedom, and more. North Carolina ranked No. 13.  
 
A significant portion of California’s tax revenue comes from capital gains taxes, making the state highly dependent on the stock market’s performance. In boom times, this can lead to substantial windfalls; however, it also means that revenue is highly volatile and can plummet during market downturns, leading to substantial budget deficits. 

Its expansive spending on social programs, education and healthcare exacerbated California’s fiscal woes. While these programs initially aimed to provide a high level of public service, they have also led to fiscal instability. 

Gavin Newsom speaking at bill signing ceremony.

Democratic California Gov. Gavin Newsom leads a state that has gone from surplus to a huge deficit. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

A key issue is that high tax rates have not translated into stable revenue streams. The Golden State’s reliance on high-income earners and capital gains means that its revenue is highly volatile, fluctuating significantly with economic cycles. The New York Times said, “When the rich do well, the state government reaps a bonanza. But when the stock market slumps or initial public offerings dwindle, revenue plummets.”  

CLICK HERE FOR MORE FOX NEWS OPINION

This volatility makes budgeting challenging and often results in substantial deficits during economic downturns. 

Advertisement

California’s budget process is further complicated by the state’s commitment to numerous unfunded mandates and pension liabilities. The state’s pension system is underfunded by billions of dollars, putting additional strain on the budget. Despite high tax revenues, the state frequently finds itself in a fiscal crisis, forced to make painful cuts or propose tax increases to balance the budget. 

When a state’s budget is volatile, the effects on state workers such as teachers, state park employees and correctional officers can be profound and destabilizing. Budget unpredictability often leads to cycles of boom and bust, where periods of fiscal surplus may result in temporary increases in salaries, hiring and program funding, only to be followed by sharp cutbacks, layoffs and pay freezes during downturns.  

California ranked No. 49 in the Fraser Institute’s 2023 economic freedom report, which evaluates states and provinces based on variables such as government spending, taxes, labor market freedom, and more. North Carolina ranked No. 13.  

This instability can create a climate of uncertainty and low morale among state employees, who may face the constant threat of job insecurity and reduced benefits.  

Advertisement

North Carolina’s fiscal discipline offers a blueprint for other states, demonstrating that conservative fiscal policies can lead to economic stability and growth. By maintaining low taxes and controlling spending, North Carolina has created an environment conducive to business and investment, fostering economic resilience even during challenging times.  

California, on the other hand, illustrates the pitfalls of high taxes and expansive spending without adequate fiscal controls. As the nation observes these contrasting outcomes, it becomes clear that responsible budget management, as exemplified by North Carolina, is essential for economic prosperity. States should adopt similar conservative fiscal policies to achieve stable and sustainable economic growth. 

Read the full article from Here

Continue Reading

San Francisco, CA

Sister Roma to Lead San Francisco Queer History Bus Tour for Pride Month

Published

on

Sister Roma to Lead San Francisco Queer History Bus Tour for Pride Month


Though Drag Me Downtown is free to attend, those wishing to get their hands on some Pride 2024 goodies can pre-register for $10, the proceeds of which will be donated to San Francisco’s Transgender District. Since 2017, the cultural district has been taking steps to ensure tenant protections for Tenderloin residents, working with the city to preserve sites of LGBTQ historical significance and providing workforce development programs and other community-minded activities.

“As a San Francisco native and the city’s first drag laureate,” Drollinger shared in a statement, “my goal is and will always be to celebrate and elevate the art of drag. I am thrilled that I was asked to participate in bringing some sparkle to this fabulous series.”





Source link

Continue Reading

Denver, CO

Insider Reveals Bottom-Line Truth About Why Courtland Sutton is Holding Out

Published

on

Insider Reveals Bottom-Line Truth About Why Courtland Sutton is Holding Out


Veteran wide receiver Courtland Sutton has been absent from the voluntary portion of the Denver Broncos offseason training program. Sutton is reportedly seeking a new contract, despite having two years left on his current deal.

Sutton is set to earn a $13.5 million base salary in 2024, but only $2 million of is guaranteed. Theories have abounded on exactly what the veteran wideout wants from the Broncos, wth some surmizing that he might simply be seeking more guarantees in his contract.

However, according to ESPN‘s Jeremy Fowler, Sutton is seeking a modest raise from the Broncos.

“He’s due about $13.6 million in cash this year,” Fowler said during a SportsCenter appearance. “He’d like to see that get up, maybe in that $15-$16 million range. We’ll see if they can find a sweet spot.”

Advertisement

What happens next on the Broncos? Don’t miss out on any news and analysis! Take a second, sign up for our free newsletter, and get breaking Broncos news delivered to your inbox daily!

Fowler also reported that no “real progress” has been made between Sutton and the Broncos. However, head coach Sean Payton played down Sutton’s hold-out thus far, saying last week followijgn an OTA practice, “That will sort itself out.”

If Sutton is only seeking a $2-3 million raise, Payton’s response is more understandable. For a playmaker who carried the Broncos’ passing offense last year, totaling a career-high 10 receiving touchdowns, throwing a couple extra million on top of what he’s making now wouldn’t be asking for the world.

The Broncos will want to be smart about it, though, as Sutton is entering his age-29 season. He’ll turn 30 in October of 2025, which is only a couple of months before his current contract expires. Broncos GM George Paton planned that well when he extended Sutton back in 2021.

Perhaps the Broncos don’t need to add any years to the term of Sutton’s contract, and instead, literally just give him a raise. Increase his $13.5M salary to, say, $15.5M, offer some additional money via playing time incentives, and convert more of it into guarantees.

Advertisement

Sutton hasn’t missed any mandatory team activities thus far. But 9NEWS‘ Mike Klis, with some mandatory stuff coming up in June, did the research on what it would cost Sutton in fines to skip out on the requisite minicamp this summer, which is from June 11-13.

Klis wrote on Twitter that Sutton could be fined $16,953 for missing the first day of mandatory minicamp, $33,908 for the second, and $50,855 for the third day. It adds up to a pretty penny, but only if the Broncos enforced his contract and fined him.

For NFL players in Sutton’s earning bracket, that’s chump change. And he could make it all back and a heck of a lot more by coming out on the winning end of his hold-out and getting the Broncos to acquiesce.

Meanwhile, the Broncos aren’t lacking pass-catchers, with Troy Franklin and Devaughn Vele added in the NFL draft, as well as Tim Patrick returning from injury. Throw in Marvin Mims Jr., Lil’Jordan Humphrey, Brandon Johnson, and others, and Bo Nix, Zach Wilson, and Jarrett Stidham have no shortage of guys to throw to during in OTAs.

But it sure would be nice to have the alpha dog in the house.

Advertisement

Follow Mile High Huddle on X and Facebook and subscribe on YouTube for daily Broncos live-stream podcasts!





Source link

Continue Reading

Trending