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Oregon State vs. Cal Poly College Basketball Predictions & Picks – December 4

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Oregon State vs. Cal Poly College Basketball Predictions & Picks – December 4


Monday’s game features the Oregon State Beavers (4-3) and the Cal Poly Mustangs (3-5) squaring off at Gill Coliseum in what should be a lopsided matchup, with a projected 79-66 victory for heavily favored Oregon State according to our computer prediction. Game time is at 10:00 PM ET on December 4.

The matchup has no line set.

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Oregon State vs. Cal Poly Game Info & Odds

  • Date: Monday, December 4, 2023
  • Time: 10:00 PM ET
  • TV: Pac-12 Network
  • Where: Corvallis, Oregon
  • Venue: Gill Coliseum

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Oregon State vs. Cal Poly Score Prediction

  • Prediction:
    Oregon State 79, Cal Poly 66

Spread & Total Prediction for Oregon State vs. Cal Poly

  • Computer Predicted Spread: Oregon State (-12.4)
  • Computer Predicted Total: 145.1

Oregon State has gone 3-3-0 against the spread, while Cal Poly’s ATS record this season is 4-2-0. Both the Beavers and the Mustangs are 4-2-0 in terms of going over the point total in their games this season.

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Oregon State Performance Insights

  • The Beavers score 71.6 points per game (246th in college basketball) and give up 72.0 (200th in college basketball) for a -3 scoring differential overall.
  • The 33.4 rebounds per game Oregon State averages rank 173rd in the country, and are 1.9 fewer than the 35.3 its opponents grab per outing.
  • Oregon State hits 1.7 fewer threes per contest than the opposition, 5.9 (295th in college basketball) compared to its opponents’ 7.6.
  • The Beavers average 88.6 points per 100 possessions on offense (281st in college basketball), and give up 89.1 points per 100 possessions (175th in college basketball).
  • Oregon State has committed 13.3 turnovers per game (275th in college basketball play) while forcing 12.9 (130th in college basketball).

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Oregon

Oregon Senate passes bill to end Daylight Saving Time if California, Washington follow

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Oregon Senate passes bill to end Daylight Saving Time if California, Washington follow


SALEM Ore. (KPTV) – The Oregon Senate on Monday morning approved a bill that would end Daylight Saving Time, under the condition that California and Washington do the same.

The bill abolishes the annual one-hour change from standard time to Daylight Saving Time and maintains the Pacific Time Zone portion of Oregon on standard time for all 12 months of the calendar year, if California and Washington make the same change within the next 10 years.

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A senate committee on Thursday overwhelmingly approved a plan that would do away with the state’s annual one-hour switch from standard to Daylight Saving Time.

If both California and Washington don’t end Daylight Saving Time by March 2034, the Oregon bill will be repealed.

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Oregon is only the third state to pass such a bill. Both Hawaii and Arizona are already on permanent standard time.

The bill now goes to the Oregon House for consideration.

No matter what happens with the bill this year, Daylight Saving Time will continue on March 10, starting at 2 a.m.



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Oregon dad allegedly drugged daughter's 12-year-old friends at sleepover with laced smoothies

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Oregon dad allegedly drugged daughter's 12-year-old friends at sleepover with laced smoothies


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An Oregon father allegedly drugged his daughter’s 12-year-old friends with laced smoothies and subsequently watched as they drifted off to sleep during a sleepover, according to police.

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Michael Meyden, 57, surrendered at the Clackamas County Jail on Wednesday after he was indicted by a grand jury on multiple charges in connection with the sleepover on Aug. 26, Lake Oswego police said in a news release.

Officers responded to a hospital in August after three 12-year-old girls tested positive for benzodiazepine, a depressant that produces sedation and hypnosis. The girls told officers they were at a friend’s house the night before for a sleepover in which Meyden, their friend’s father, made mango smoothies and “insisted they drink them,” according to a probable cause affidavit, FOX TV Stations reported.

The girls watched movies and did facials in the basement before Meyden allegedly pressured them to drink the laced smoothies.

LIBERAL OREGON U-TURNS, PASSES BILL TO RECRIMINALIZE HARD DRUGS AS OVERDOSE DEATHS SKYROCKET

An Oregon father allegedly drugged his daughter’s 12-year-old friends with laced smoothies and subsequently watched as they drifted off to sleep during a sleepover. (Lake Oswego Police)

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The smoothies had “tiny white chunks throughout and sprinkled on top,” the girls told police.

One girl attempted to decline the smoothie, but Meyden allegedly insisted she try it. She then said she had a few sips but did not drink much of the smoothie, and Meyden monitored her consumption and grew angry when he observed the girls drinking out of each other’s drinks. He claimed he gave each of them a different colored reusable straw and insisted they drink out of their own cup.

Police said one girl reported feeling “woozy, hot and clumsy” after drinking the smoothie before falling over, blacking out and going into a “thick, deep sleep.”

Another girl managed to stay awake and said she “could feel him watching her by his presence as she kept her eyes shut, pretending to be asleep,” the document stated. She said she believed he was “doing tests to make sure we weren’t awake,” including by allegedly putting his finger under a girl’s nose and twice moving a girl’s arm and body on the bed during his repeated trips to the basement where the girls were sleeping.

Benzodiazepine

Officers had responded to a hospital in August after three 12-year-old girls tested positive for benzodiazepine, a depressant that produces sedation and hypnosis. (Getty Images)

The girl stayed awake in fear that Meyden was “going to do something,” the affidavit said. She texted her mother asking her to come and pick her up because she did not feel safe around Meyden.

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“Mom please pick me up and say I had a family emergency,” the girl texted her mother at 1:43 a.m. “I don’t feel safe. I might not respond but please come get me (crying emoji), Please. Please pick up. Please. PLEASE!!”

The affidavit said the girl was eventually able to get in touch with a family friend who came and picked her up and woke up the girl’s parents, who notified the other girls’ parents.

At 3 a.m., when the parents of the other girls drove to Meyden’s house to pick them up, he resisted and asked them to return in the morning. The parents informed him that they would be bringing their children home immediately.

OREGON NURSE COULD FACE DOZENS OF LAWSUITS FOR SWITCHING FENTANYL DRIPS WITH TAP WATER

Lake Oswego police cruiser

The smoothies had “tiny white chunks throughout and sprinkled on top,” the girls told police. (Lake Oswego Police)

One of the girls allegedly could not walk on her own and kept asking “what happened,” which prompted her parents to take her to the hospital. When officers spoke to the girl less than 12 hours after she drank the smoothie, they said she “walked slowly and used the assistance of her mother for balance, her eyelids were heavy, and she spoke slowly,” according to the affidavit.

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Meyden was charged on Feb. 26, six months after the sleepover took place. He is facing six felony charges and three misdemeanors: three counts of causing another to ingest a controlled substance, three counts of application of a Schedule 4 controlled substance to another and three counts of delivery of a controlled substance to a minor.

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He pleaded not guilty during his arraignment Wednesday in Clackamas County Circuit Court and posted $50,000 bail.

According to court records, Meyden and his wife divorced on Oct. 17, less than two months after the sleepover. They had owned a home in Lake Oswego at the time of the sleepover.



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Oregon Senate passes bill to recriminalize certain drug possession crimes

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Oregon Senate passes bill to recriminalize certain drug possession crimes


The Oregon Senate passed House Bill 4002 by a vote of 21-8 Friday, which recriminalizes certain drug possession charges that Oregon voters voted to decriminalize in 2020.

Under the bill, individuals charged with possession of small amounts of drugs like methamphetamine or fentanyl will face misdemeanor charges that can result in jail time. Additionally, the bill contains provisions intended to expand access to opioid withdrawal treatment medications and make it easier for individuals to get addiction treatment.

In 2020, Oregon voters passed Measure 110, which made most unlawful possession of a controlled substance offenses a Class E violation. A Class E violation is a less serious offense than a misdemeanor and only involves a fine of $100. Measure 110 allowed individuals charged with unlawful possession to have their charges dismissed if they sought treatment within 45 days of receiving a citation. This change applied to Schedule I-IV drug possession offenses. The measure also established a drug addiction treatment program funded by the state’s marijuana tax revenue. House Bill 4002 would make most of these offenses misdemeanors again.

In response to the passage of the bill, Policy Director of the ACLU of Oregon Jessica Maravilla stated:

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Together, ACLU of Oregon’s more than 27,000 members imagined an Oregon filled with healing and thriving communities, not more jails and prisons. Thousands of us took action and engaged in our democracy — calling and emailing lawmakers and submitting testimony for hearings. We asked for real solutions including more treatment, housing, prevention programs, community revitalization efforts, and non-police mobile crisis response teams. The ACLU of Oregon community has deep gratitude for the lawmakers who voted ‘no’ to the false promises of criminalization in HB 4002 — and its unconscionable human and other costs to our state.

Conversely, Oregon Senate Republican Leader Tim Knopp praised the bill’s passage, stating:

Republicans stand united with Oregonians who overwhelmingly believe we deserve better than Measure 110. In this historic vote to reimpose criminal penalties for drug possession, we are making it clear that Oregon is no longer a drug tourism state. Though lawmakers will have much more to do in future sessions to continue making progress on the fentanyl-fueled drug overdose and addiction crisis facing our state, I was proud to stand on the right side of history by casting my vote in favor for HB 4002. Passing this bill will put Oregon on a path to recovery and signifies and end to the nationwide decriminalization movement. I call that a victory.

The bill will now go to Oregon Governor Tina Kotek for passage. If Kotek signs the bill, it will become law in Oregon. However, if Kotek vetoes the bill, the state legislature can override the veto with a two-thirds vote of those present in both the House and the Senate, and the bill will become law without Kotek’s approval. Also, if Kotek does not sign or veto the bill, it will become law on either January 1, 2025 or the prescribed effective date on the bill. The Oregon House previously passed the bill by a vote of 51-7.



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