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Buy women's basketball tickets for Oregon State vs. Washington on February 25

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Buy women's basketball tickets for Oregon State vs. Washington on February 25


Sunday’s Pac-12 schedule includes the Washington Huskies (13-10) facing the Oregon State Beavers (20-3) at 3:00 PM ET.

If you’re looking to attend this game in person, head to StubHub or Ticketmaster to purchase your tickets!

Oregon State vs. Washington Game Information

Watch college basketball, other live sports and more on Fubo! Use our link to sign up for a free trial.

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Buy Tickets for Other Oregon State Games

Rep your team with officially licensed college basketball gear! Head to Fanatics to find jerseys, shirts, and much more.

Oregon State Players to Watch

  • Raegan Beers: 18.2 PTS, 11.1 REB, 1.9 AST, 1.2 STL, 1.3 BLK
  • Talia van Oelhoffen: 10.7 PTS, 4.4 REB, 5.1 AST, 1.0 STL, 0.5 BLK
  • Timea Gardiner: 9.7 PTS, 6.4 REB, 1.5 AST, 0.2 STL, 0.3 BLK
  • Kelsey Rees: 6.1 PTS, 4.7 REB, 0.9 AST, 0.4 STL, 1.3 BLK
  • Donovyn Hunter: 6.5 PTS, 1.9 REB, 3.4 AST, 0.8 STL, 0.2 BLK

Catch college basketball action all season long on Fubo!

Washington Players to Watch

  • Dalayah Daniels: 11.7 PTS, 7.1 REB, 1.8 AST, 1.0 STL, 2.0 BLK
  • Hannah Stines: 9.6 PTS, 4.7 REB, 2.4 AST, 0.7 STL, 0.4 BLK
  • Elle Ladine: 12.0 PTS, 5.5 REB, 1.6 AST, 0.6 STL, 0.3 BLK
  • Lauren Schwartz: 10.8 PTS, 2.8 REB, 1.9 AST, 0.9 STL, 0.5 BLK
  • Sayvia Sellers: 7.2 PTS, 2.0 REB, 1.9 AST, 1.3 STL, 0.2 BLK

Sportsbook Promo Codes

Not all offers available in all states, please visit BetMGM for the latest promotions for your area. Must be 21+ to gamble, please wager responsibly. If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, contact 1-800-GAMBLER.

© 2023 Data Skrive. All rights reserved.



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Oregon

Oregon’s ‘30 Years War’ over campaign finance reform approaches its final battle – Oregon Capital Chronicle

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Oregon’s ‘30 Years War’ over campaign finance reform approaches its final battle – Oregon Capital Chronicle


How did we get to the point in Oregon’s current legislative session that leaders of both parties and representatives of major business and labor groups are uniting in an effort to enact long-overdue limits on big money donations to candidate campaigns?

One reason: Voters clearly want something done. A 2023 poll by the Oregon Values and Beliefs Center found 75% of Oregonians agree that “laws should be passed to regulate unlimited money in political campaigns.”

Another reason: Reformers have used the initiative process to keep this issue in front of voters and the courts for 30 years now.

But the real reason: With voter approval of a constitutional amendment to authorize campaign funding and spending limits in 2020, sponsors of the latest campaign finance reform initiative (Initiative Petition 9) have the political winds at their back as they work to qualify their measure for this year’s general election ballot. 

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In short, the good government reformers appear to be holding a winning hand, and institutional insiders want to reshuffle the deck. But it has taken too long, with too many election wins overturned in unfriendly courtrooms and promises made but never delivered by cagey lawmakers for the reformers to fold their hand now.

For three decades, Oregon voters have been supporting ballot initiatives to limit the role of big money in candidate elections. In 1994, they approved Measure 9 by 72% in favor and 28% against to limit contributions to candidates and campaign spending. But, just three years later, the Oregon Supreme Court gutted the measure and left candidates free to pursue unlimited contributions from wealthy donors and well-funded political action committees. 

I remember sitting in a legislative hearing room on the February morning in 1997 when the Supreme Court released its decision (in Vannatta v. Keisling) invalidating the contribution limits in Measure 9. A staff person whispered the news to the chair of the committee, who immediately recessed the hearing, took a few steps from the dais and, gesturing like a gambler pulling the lever of a slot machine, quipped to those nearby: “Ka-ching, ka-ching.” I thought at the time: That says it all.

But the good government groups behind Measure 9 never gave up. They took a two-pronged approach to the ballot in 2006, with proposals to amend the state constitution to authorize campaign contribution and spending limits (Measure 46) and another to place specific limits in statute (Measure 47). The former failed, but voters approved the contribution limits in the latter, only to have the secretary of state declare them unenforceable and the courts to affirm them as inoperative without a constitutional amendment or a reversal of the Vannatta decision.

Then, in 2020, the reformers got both. The Oregon Supreme Court reversed its decision in the Vannatta case in response to yet another campaign finance measure approved by the voters in Multnomah County. And, later that year, voters statewide approved a constitutional amendment (Measure 107) to allow the enactment of campaign contribution and spending limits at the state and local level. The vote for Measure 107 was 78% in favor, even stronger than the vote for Measure 9 in 1994.

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In the wake of these victories, the drafters of IP 9 are well on their way to delivering a viable campaign finance proposal to Oregon voters. According to the summary of IP 9’s provisions approved by the Oregon Supreme Court, the initiative would limit contributions to candidates and political committees, limit the carry forward of unspent campaign funds after elections and require political advertisements to identify their top four funders, among other provisions. 

If ever there was a more determined and singularly focused use of the initiative process to advance the will of the voters over the entrenched and dogged resistance of institutional interests, I can’t think of one. And, whatever one thinks of the mind-numbing details of campaign contribution limits and the risk of driving big money into the dark corners of independent expenditure campaigns, the reformers who brought us to this point deserve our respect. 

Perhaps it is a kind of respect that they’re now getting from the Legislature. Lawmakers are not only paying attention, they’re trying to enact legislation that will give themselves a first mover advantage on an issue they’ve been resisting for decades.

In these election year legislative sessions, it’s not unusual for the governor and lawmakers to engage with the sponsors of competing ballot measures, broker compromises and enact legislation to avoid what are always called “costly ballot measure fights.” In other instances, they’ve joined those fights, by referring their own alternatives to the ballot. 

But what’s happening this time is different. Backers of IP 9 don’t want to negotiate any changes; they’re confident that they’ll have the support of the voters in November. Meanwhile, lawmakers and their major donors aren’t interested in going head-to-head with IP 9 by sending their own measure to the ballot. Instead, by enacting their own proposal, legislators hope to convince voters that there’s nothing to see here anymore and it’s time to move on to other issues.

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I’m not taking sides at this point on the merits of the Legislature’s plan (House Bill 4024-3) versus IP 9. But I do think voters deserve to consider any alternative proposal from the Legislature on equal ground with IP 9. 

For now, it’s worth recognizing what has created this moment of legislative urgency and business-labor cooperation. As a spokesperson for Oregon Business and Industry, the state’s largest business group, told Oregon Public Broadcasting, “We think the current system, frankly, works just fine. But we’re responding to a reality where campaign finance reform is coming. The days of the current system are over.”

Give credit to the backers of IP 9 for creating that reality. And stay tuned for what’s likely to be the final battle in Oregon’s “30 Years War” over campaign finance reform in which the good government reformers once again take on the institutional insiders. 

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Oregon State University researchers are first to see at-risk bat flying over open ocean

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Oregon State University researchers are first to see at-risk bat flying over open ocean


CORVALLIS, Ore. – On a research cruise focused on marine mammals and seabirds, Oregon State University scientists earned an unexpected bonus: The first-ever documented sighting of a hoary bat flying over the open ocean.

The bat was seen in the Humboldt Wind Energy Area about 30 miles off the northern California coast; the Humboldt area has been leased for potential offshore energy development, and the hoary bat is the species of bat most frequently found dead at wind power facilities on land.

OSU faculty research assistant Will Kennerley, the first to see the bat, and colleagues documented the sighting with a paper in the Journal of North American Bat Research. The bat was spotted just after 1 p.m. on Oct. 3, 2022, in observing conditions rated as excellent.

“I have spent a lot of time at sea in all oceans of the world, and I’ve seen a lot of amazing things,” said Lisa Ballance, director of OSU’s Marine Mammal Institute. “A hoary bat was a first for all of us. It’s a reminder of the wonder of nature, and of its vulnerability.”

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Hoary bats are strong fliers and highly migratory, moving from breeding areas across North America to southern or coastal wintering areas, the scientists said. They are regular visitors to the Farallon Islands near San Francisco and to Bermuda, but a review of current and historic records of offshore bats in North America indicated that a hoary bat had never been spotted from a ship.

Hoary bats can fly as high as 2,400 meters – well beyond the vision of human observers and outside the acoustic range of ultrasonic detectors, which could partly explain why the species has seldom been detected offshore, the researchers note.

Kennerley and Oregon State marine ecologist Leigh Torres were aboard the R/V Pacific Storm as part of the MOSAIC Project, which studies the distributions and densities of seabirds and marine mammals around potential offshore wind energy areas. Ballance is the four-year project’s principal investigator.

The bat appeared during a seabird survey 49 kilometers off the coast of Arcata, California. It was flying between 5 and 10 meters above the ocean, generally approaching the Pacific Storm from the north, and got as close as 50 meters to the vessel.

“We of course didn’t set out to look for bats at sea, but this demonstrates the value of having observers out on the water ready and able to document unexpected observations like this,” said Kennerley, who photographed the bat. “I think surprises like this are one of the most exciting parts of doing science.”

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Research including a 2019 study led by OSU-Cascades suggests the hoary bat, known scientifically as Lasiurus cinereus, is declining at a rate that threatens its long-term future in the Pacific Northwest.

Bat population declines are problematic for a host of reasons, researchers say. In many environments worldwide bats provide ecosystem services including pollination, pest control and seed dispersion. They are one of the most diverse groups of mammals but are not well understood, and have in recent years become at great risk both from wind energy production and from the invasive bat disease white-nose syndrome.

Wind power affects bats through collision and barotrauma, which refers to injuries caused by rapid changes in atmospheric pressure like what can occur around the blades of a wind turbine. Examination of dead bats collected near turbines often reveals signs of the internal hemorrhaging associated with barotrauma rather than collision.

The scientists on the Pacific Storm say their observation provides further evidence that the hoary bats sometimes use offshore habitat. That the sighting occurred within a leased offshore wind energy area highlights the potential for hoary bats to be affected by offshore energy development, they note.

“Our study only documents a single individual but nonetheless suggests a greater need for studies looking at threats bats may face at sea,” Kennerley said.

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Donald Solick of the Electric Power Research Institute and Vesper Bat Detection Services is the corresponding author on the paper, which is based on work funded by the U.S. departments of Energy and the Interior. OSU marine ecologist Rachael Orben is also a co-author of the paper.



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Oregon Woman Takes Guinness Tongue Record

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Oregon Woman Takes Guinness Tongue Record


If there’s a woman in the world with a bigger tongue than Portland, Oregon, resident Jenny DuVander, Guinness World Records doesn’t know about her. DuVander is the new record holder for largest tongue circumference (female) in the world. Guinness says her tongue has a circumference of 5.21 inches, making it bigger than a soda can. She says her son urged her to get in touch with Guinness after they were looking at the 2023 Guinness Book of World Records together and they saw the male record holder—West Virginia man Braydon McCullough, whose tongue has a 6.3-inch circumference.

“My record is definitely inspired by his love of facts and human abilities,” DuVander says of her son, per KOIN. She says the subject of her tongue usually comes up when people are comparing what tongue tricks they can do. “I also play the flute, and a strong tongue is pretty useful for playing fast notes,” she says. “When you articulate a note on a flute, they actually call it tonguing.”

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DuVander says she can touch her nose with her tongue—and her daughter has the same ability. “Tongues aren’t exactly gorgeous, are they?” she says. “But, they are pretty cool. They’re pure muscle and so agile. When you think about it, the tongue is the only muscle that’s free to move around like that. We use it all the time to speak and eat. It moves around all day and never gets tired.” (More Guinness World Records stories.)





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