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Vexus Fiber kicks off $50M buildout in Las Cruces, New Mexico

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Vexus Fiber kicks off $50M buildout in Las Cruces, New Mexico


Vexus Fiber is kicking off a $50 million network buildout in Las Cruces, New Mexico, one of over a dozen markets where it’s building fiber. | Vexus aims to cover 44,000 Las Cruces homes and businesses over the next three years. Initial service is scheduled to go live by the end of March.



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New Mexico

The story of illegal to legal marijuana in New Mexico  – Valencia County News-Bulletin

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The story of illegal to legal marijuana in New Mexico  – Valencia County News-Bulletin


first person 

 

John Lopez

I’ve written about marijuana in several (letters) to the editor in the Valencia County News-Bulletin and the Albuquerque Journal.  

In each opinion, I revealed how the CEO of Ultra, the largest producer/vendor of marijuana in New Mexico was able to get a head start on the business way before it was legalized by Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham, who lobbied the Legislature to do so.   

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The democratically-controlled Legislature was ready to introduce it and get more than enough Democrats to vote in the affirmative when the bill came before them. Lujan and the Ultra CEO coupled with all the representatives and senators who supported the legislation were elated. All they could see was thousands of new dollars coming into the state coffers for them to spend stupidly as they were used to doing.  

Additionally, I as a “no” vote warned of the dangers that would result, the great human heartache and further erosion of the family unit and the population of New Mexico in general, especially the younger members, many who were already experimenting with mind altering drugs and alcohol. Age limits imposed by the law are as effective as is the purchase of alcohol. Underage potential users will find ways to get around any regulations that may supposedly control the sale of the products.  

Further, about the same time that work was being directed on marijuana, other players were working on legalizing hemp. This effort was being directed by a representative who presented the effort as a harmless agricultural plant that would help not harm the population when used appropriately. People didn’t know then that the hemp plant and by products were the same plant that produces the ingredients to produce marijuana. 

Recently, we learned that youngsters who were given, supposedly, harmless gummies laced with hemp, experienced poisonous results, i.e., nausea, vomiting, dizziness, shortness of breath, etc., many requiring visits to emergency rooms. Clearly, the representative who was pushing the legalization of hemp was in cahoots with the marijuana crowd, all who had evil thoughts in their minds about huge profits that would accrue to all of them.   

The representative who led the hemp charge left his office, I’m sure, because he did not want to face the consequences that we are now dealing with in addition to a state-wide water shortage exacerbated by haphazard agricultural practices.  

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Marijuana legalization was headed by a gentleman who had worked for the state of New Mexico several years. His last job, I believe, was as secretary of the Human Services Department. While employed by the state, he set the stage for New Mexico to eventually legalize marijuana. This man is very smart and used his employment to lobby legislators and others regarding marijuana. When he left his job, he continued lobbying efforts and concomitantly started getting ready to become a marijuana entrepreneur.  

He purchased property in Corrales under the pretense that he was going to develop a vineyard. There was some push back by neighbors who were concerned about excessive water consumption that he overcame. When the time came, he was ready to farm marijuana. Water consumption was now a moot issue.   

He proved to the opposition that the new crop would not use any more water than what the grape vines had consumed. Water consumption, however, continues to be a problem throughout the state. Regardless, once he got the state permit, he launched his first marijuana farm, followed by others throughout the state. As I indicated before, he is now the “king” of the marijuana farmers.  

Now, to be clear, the “king’s” lobbying also included talks of benefits to New Mexico from hemp, which was pushed as a totally safe and friendly agricultural product, all the while keeping an eye on the more potentially harmful and more lucrative product, marijuana.  

The employee and lobbyist previously mentioned is indeed, today, the “king” of marijuana growers and vendors. The legislator who succeeded in legalizing hemp is getting his rewards from the supposedly harmless products derived from hemp. Interestingly enough, hemp is the plant that also produces the chemical required to make marijuana. This gentleman was a state representative when the “king” was pushing legalization of marijuana. What a coincidence!  

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New Mexico loves the revenues being generated by the sale of hemp and marijuana products. Once legalized, the “king” was already producing plants in what started out as a vineyard. Initially, little or no consideration was given to water consumption or equally important, mental and physical problems that hemp and marijuana would produce and we would have to address in an already medically under-served state.   

It is only today in 2024 that the New Mexico leadership and medical and law enforcement personnel are seeing the negatives of the wild and senseless legislative efforts that did generate the expected revenue for them to spend, as well as the expenditures that would be required for services to address the negative impacts.  

Incidentally, our governor and legislators, along with John Baynor, former speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, can be credited and thanked for the mess that legalization of hemp and marijuana have handed us. You see, when Baynor was in office, he opposed legalization of marijuana in the country. Once he retired, in short order he supposedly changed his mind, turned pro-legalization and quickly accepted a position on the board of directors of a huge marijuana producer based in New York. To my knowledge, he continues to serve and make bundles.  

The push to legalize marijuana across the country continues. Concomitantly, the social, physical and mental problems related to consumption of the products continue to pop up and grow exponentially. New Mexico’s government shows some signs of concern, but, beyond minimal concern, it is more concerned and thrilled with the revenue marijuana and gas and oil are bringing into state coffers. They are like kids going crazy in an ice cream shop, spending public money like there was no end, or more appropriately, “como marranos trompudos!” By the way, what else is new?  

Incidentally, three cheers for the city of Belen, its mayor and council for standing up and limiting the number of marijuana shops to seven!  Congratulations!  

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Good luck you senseless servants of the people.  Hopefully, the Lord’s words will intervene and bring you to your senses. Otherwise, we wait for the time when water needs create other more serious problems along with social/health problems, when you fully understand, the monster you created, the monster you can’t force back into the magic lamp.    

In closing, permit me to beseech you to think about all the human beings that you have hurt and are going to hurt all because of your short sightedness.  

(John Lopez is a retired professor and administrator. He has a doctorate from New Mexico State University and taught at Western New Mexico University. He retired as vice president of academic affairs from Luna Community College. He lives in Bosque Farms with his wife, Anna.) 



John Lopez, guest columnist



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Tucson family reunited with missing teen after he was found in New Mexico

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Tucson family reunited with missing teen after he was found in New Mexico


TUCSON, Ariz. (13 News) – A Tucson family is holding one of their own a little closer tonight.

Marcus Tessier, 13, went missing from his home near Grant and Fairview on Monday night or Tuesday morning. The teen, who is non-verbal and autistic, was found at a Walmart in Deming, New Mexico, late Tuesday.

How the teen made it more than 200 miles away is still a mystery. For now, all Marcus’ family cares about is that he is back home and safe.

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Renee Desmond, Marcus’ mother, said the hours her son was missing were the worst in her life. According to Renee, when she woke up on Tuesday Marcus was nowhere to be found.

“He took off walking and it was just really scary,” Renee said.

Renee said having a child disappear is something no mother should ever wake up to.

“When I couldn’t find him, I realized that he had gone out,” Renee said. “I was looking in the backyard and I couldn’t find him. I went to be a security camera and I was trying to find footage to see which way he went.”

Renee immediately called the police and began the search.

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“Police got the bloodhound and they were able to track him down Alturas, down to Fairview, and down to Grant to the train tracks,” Renee said. “It just stopped there.”

While it’s a mystery how Marcus got to Deming, his aunt Helene Desmond has some theories.

“There is a possibility that he hopped on a train,” she said. “There is also a possibility that a semi or a driver was stopping to get Dunkin Donuts and saw a vulnerable person.”

The Deming Police Department told 13 News that its School Resource Officer was summonsed to the Mimbres Memorial Hospital to help identify a patient.

When the SRO was unable to identify the teenager, officials quickly reached out to the New Mexico State Police for help issuing an alert.

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Through investigation, Marcus was identified. His mother was notified and drove to Deming to pick him up.

“We’re so lucky and blessed that he came back to us given the circumstances and the odds,” Renee said.

According to Helene, posting on social media helped in the search.

“We were all just so shocked and being able to take pictures and hug him and hold him,” she said. “It was just a very special moment.”

According to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, if you happen to see a child who appears to be lost there are important tips to keep in mind.

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Experts said to avoid any physical contact with the child.

If you can, ask the child questions like if they know if they are lost or the location of their parents, but remember that many children are taught not to give out too much personal information to strangers.

It’s also important to never put a child in a car, and try to seek help. If it’s safe to do so, remain at the immediate location and wait for law enforcement.

Both Helene and Renee said that as hard as it is not to blame themselves, it’s important for people not to assume or judge why or how any child vanishes.

“Children with special needs have those innate natures to want to be independent and wants to do things,” Helene said. “We have to do it in a controlled environment but not always get to it right then and there. When those things happen we have to remember, that we are human.”

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The family wants to thank law enforcement and the community for their support and quick response in locating Marcus.

Be sure to subscribe to the 13 News YouTube channel: www.youtube.com/@13newskold



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NMDOH reports first child death of 2023-24 flu season

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NMDOH reports first child death of 2023-24 flu season


SANTA FE, N.M. — The New Mexico Department of Health reported Tuesday the state’s first child flu death of the 2023-24 season.

NMDOH identified the child as a 5-to-12-year-old Bernalillo County child, who died from complications associated with the flu.

So far this season, there have been 94 pneumonia and flu-related deaths among adults. The 2022-23, 2021-22 and 2020-21 flu seasons saw 264 deaths, 197 deaths and 160 deaths, respectively.

Meanwhile, the 2019-20 and 2018-19 flu seasons saw 254 deaths and 237 deaths, respectively.

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The health department says certain times of the year bring on spikes in respiratory illnesses but it can happen any time of year.

Last season, officials reported the first child death of flu season in April 2023.

Health officials recommend staying up-to-date with your vaccinations, being aware of risk factors and using safe practices. Learn more about all of that by clicking here.



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