Connect with us

New Mexico

New Mexico again ranks at the bottom for child wellbeing – NM Political Report

Published

on

New Mexico again ranks at the bottom for child wellbeing – NM Political Report


New Mexico continues to rank at the bottom of the country for child well-being, with a score of 50th and also at the bottom for childhood education, according to the new KIDS Count Data Book.  The Annie E. Casey Foundation KIDS COUNT Data Book is an annual assessment of child wellbeing state by state. Besides […]

New Mexico continues to rank at the bottom of the country for child well-being, with a score of 50th and also at the bottom for childhood education, according to the new KIDS Count Data Book. 

The Annie E. Casey Foundation KIDS COUNT Data Book is an annual assessment of child wellbeing state by state. Besides overall well-being, the foundation also ranks states on education, health, economic well-being and family and community. This year, the data book also contains information on Adverse Childhood Experiences on a state-by-state basis as well as chronic absences in schools. With 50 percent of New Mexico children experiencing one or more ACE for the 2021-2022 school year, New Mexico tied Mississippi for the highest percentage of children who experience one or more ACEs for the 2021-2022 school year, which is the year the most recent data is available. 

New Mexico also had one of the highest rates of chronically absent children from school for the 2021-2022 school year, with 41 percent, which tied the state of Montana. Only Oregon, Alaska, Arizona and the District of Columbia had higher percentages of chronically absent children. 

Advertisement

New Mexico Voices for Children noted that New Mexico has improved in its child poverty rate since previous rankings. In this data book, the study found 23 percent of children were living in poverty in 2022. In 2019, the rate was 25 percent.

“Although there’s still work to do, New Mexico’s official child poverty rate continues to improve but change takes time,” said Gabrielle Uballez, executive director of New Mexico Voices for Children said through a news release. “And this measure of poverty only considers income. When we look instead at the supplemental poverty measure, which measures the impact of some of our best poverty-fighting policies, we see that New Mexico’s investments in families through refundable tax credits and income support programs have a real impact on lowering poverty rates and supporting family well-being.”

The rate of teens in New Mexico who are neither working nor in school has also improved since 2019. As of 2022, the rate was 9 percent. In 2019 it was 11 percent.

But, the state, overall, ranked 48th in the nation for economic wellbeing for children. Only Louisiana and Mississippi ranked below New Mexico.

In recent years the state has enacted policy change in an effort to improve child wellbeing. The state spent 10 years trying to pass legislation that would enable a constitutional amendment to go before voters in 2022 to increase the distribution from the Permanent Land Grant Fund to provide more funding for early childhood education. The state created a department to oversee early childhood education in 2020.  

Advertisement

The state has also implemented tax policy in recent years that advocates have said benefits families. But the Uballez said the policy initiatives will require patience in order to see results. 

“New Mexico has invested significantly in our children, enhancing early childhood care and education services and introducing the new Child Tax Credit. While these initiatives have a real positive impact on the everyday lives of families today, it will take time for their full impact to be reflected in data. While data and rankings like Kids Count offer insights, they only provide a snapshot in time and don’t tell the whole story. For example, a recent report from the National Institute for Early Education Research showed that during the 2022-2023 school year, New Mexico preschool enrollment increased by 660 children to reach 13,227, and the state met nine out of ten quality standards benchmarks.

“It’s crucial that we continue to support policies such as refundable tax credits, child care assistance, increased funding for education, paid sick leave, universal school meals, and the Opportunity Scholarship. Additionally, we must enact paid family and medical leave, increase the child tax credit for families with young children, ensure a culturally relevant K-12 curriculum, and raise the minimum wage.

“We celebrate New Mexico for our already profound collective investment in kids and families, and urge advocates, lawmakers, and stakeholders to remain patient and confident in the long-term impact of our investments,” Uballez told NM Political Report through an email. 

New Mexico ranks 50th for education. The data book found that New Mexico eighth graders not proficient in math has worsened since 2019 when the rate was 79 percent. The rate of eighth graders not proficient in math in 2022 rose to 87 percent. 

Advertisement

Fourth graders not proficient in reading also increased from 76 percent in 2019 to 79 percent in 2022.

But, that follows national trends. Across the U.S., 74 percent of eighth graders were not proficient in math in 2022, while in 2019, 67 percent were. Similarly, reading proficiency decreased two percentage points from 2019 to 2022 in the U.S. so that 68 percent of fourth graders in the U.S. are not up to reading proficiency. 

The KIDS COUNT Data Book points out that children’s mental health significantly suffered during the COVID-19 pandemic and children did not have access to low-cost and free lunches when they had to engage in online learning during the early portion of the public health emergency. The data book recommended a list of strategies to improve learning and noted that New Mexico incentivized extended instructional time in 2023 by providing funding to districts that adopted longer school calendars. The data book also recommended community schools, because they provide wrap-around services for children and families and serve high-poverty, low-opportunity neighborhoods.

Emily Wildau, KIDS COUNT coordinator for New Mexico Voices for Children, said through the release that “New Mexico’s ranking in the education domain is heavily impacted by national standardized test scores, including fourth grade reading proficiency.” 

“Reading proficiency is critical for students to succeed academically and as adults. These scores do not reflect the ability of our children, but rather an education system that is not designed with our multicultural, multilingual students in mind,” Wildau said.

Advertisement

NMVC also said through the release that bottom-ranked states, including New Mexico, tend to have higher populations of children of color, “highlighting that programs and systems are not designed to support them.”

In the health category, New Mexico ranked 44th in the nation, but in the family and community category, the state ranked 49th, with only Mississippi ranked lower.

“New Mexico’s ranking is not a reflection of who we are but serves as a motivation to continue improving the systems in New Mexico that make it possible for kids and families to thrive,” Uballez said through the release.



Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

New Mexico

Arvada firefighter robbed while fighting New Mexico blaze

Published

on

Arvada firefighter robbed while fighting New Mexico blaze


DENVER (KDVR) — An Arvada firefighter was robbed while fighting deadly wildfires blazing in New Mexico.

Matthew Ramos was part of a Colorado crew that traveled to help battle the South Fork Fire and Salt Fire, which have burned thousands of acres near Ruidoso, New Mexico, about eight hours south of Denver.

While helping out the community, Ramos’ car was parked outside of a fire station near the burn zone. When he got back, a duffle bag full of gear and some money had been stolen.

“It looks like they broke my car door handle somehow and got in. It’s an older vehicle so it’s not hard to break into,” Ramos told FOX31. “You know, maybe they were in a bad spot and needed it more than I did. But it’s just unfortunate to see really.”

Advertisement

Ramos has returned to Arvada, and said fighting the fire was “traumatizing” and said the full impact of the massive blaze has not set in.

Despite the robbery and traumatizing experience, Ramos said he hopes to return and help fight the fire if his help is needed again.

The Associated Press reports that the blaze killed two people and destroyed hundreds of homes in the past week.



Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading

New Mexico

FBI seeks suspects in 2 New Mexico wildfires that killed 2 people, damaged hundreds of buildings

Published

on

FBI seeks suspects in 2 New Mexico wildfires that killed 2 people, damaged hundreds of buildings


APTOPIX New Mexico Wildfires

A charred car and the remains of the Swiss Chalet Hotel are pictured after being destroyed by the South Fork Fire in the mountain village of Ruidoso, N.M. on Saturday. Andres Leighton/Associated Press

RUIDOSO, N.M. — Full-time residents of Ruidoso will be allowed to return to their village Monday morning as federal authorities seek to prosecute whoever started a pair of New Mexico wildfires that killed two people and destroyed or damaged more than 1,400 structures.

The FBI said it is offering a reward of up to $10,000 for information leading to the arrests and convictions of those responsible for the South Fork Fire and Salt Fire in southern New Mexico, which forced thousands to flee.

The federal agency also said it was seeking public assistance in identifying the cause of the fires discovered on June 17 near the village of Ruidoso.

Advertisement

But the notice also pointedly suggested human hands were to blame, saying the reward was for information leading to the arrest and conviction of “the person or persons responsible for starting the fires.

Lincoln County Manager Randall Camp said at a news conference Saturday that “we are approaching a thousand homes lost” in the fires.

President Biden issued a disaster declaration for parts of southern New Mexico on Thursday. The move freed up funding and more resources to help with recovery efforts including temporary housing, low-cost loans to cover uninsured property and other emergency work in Lincoln County and on lands belonging to the Mescalero Apache Tribe.

The National Interagency Fire Center said the South Fork Fire, which reached 26 square miles, was 31% contained Sunday. It said the Salt Fire that has spread over 12 square miles was now 7% contained.

Both fires had been at zero containment Friday. Full containment isn’t expected until July 15, according to fire officials.

Advertisement

More than 1,100 firefighters continued to fight the flames in steep and rocky terrain Sunday.

The South Fork and Salt fires are still burning on both sides of Ruidoso and a threat of flash floods still looms over the village.

Authorities said downed power lines, damaged water, sewer and gas lines plus flooding in burn scars continued to pose risks to firefighters and the public.

New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham toured some of the disaster areas Saturday with Federal Emergency Management Agency administrator Deanne Criswell.

Even with federal and state assistance on the table, Ruidoso Mayor Lynn Crawford estimates it could take at least five years for the area to fully recover.

Advertisement

Ruidoso officials said those wanting to return home Monday must bring drinking water and at least a week’s worth of food. They warned residents that homes may be without gas, electricity or water.

« Previous

Prosecutors: Husband used client money to fund ‘Real Housewife’s’ career



Source link

Continue Reading

New Mexico

United pulls out win in 5th clean sheet of season

Published

on

United pulls out win in 5th clean sheet of season


ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (KRQE) – New Mexico United’s defense, and Alex Tambakis, came through yet again. The black and yellow recorded its fifth clean sheet of the year on Saturday night in a 1-0 victory over visiting Colorado Springs.

New Mexico’s defense was tested early and often. While Colorado Springs was able to get a large number of shots off (16 in total), New Mexico never waivered and kept pushing through.

United struggled to find offensive chances in the first half but started to gain momentum in the second. With the game still scoreless in stoppage time, Colorado Springs committed a penalty in the box on Mukwelle Akale to give United a chance to win. Talen Mapels stepped to the spot and sealed the win.

“I am really proud of the grittiness to find a way,” said New Mexico head coach Eric Quill. “I thought our second half was amazing, and then Talen Maples, I’m so proud of him to step up in a moment after last week he could have doubted himself. I am just ecstatic for him because this guys mental fortitude is something special.”

Advertisement

With the win, United now sits three points above second place Sacramento in the western conference. The club now hits the road to San Antonio next Saturday. The next home match will be on Wednesday, July 3.



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending