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Men’s basketball falls in Mountain West Title game, 68-61 to New Mexico

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Men’s basketball falls in Mountain West Title game, 68-61 to New Mexico


LAS VEGAS – New Mexico Lobos fans came to the Thomas & Mack Center in Las Vegas and let their  chants be heard, as the sixth-seeded team was victorious, 68-61, over the No. 5 San Diego State Aztecs in the championship game of the Mountain West Conference Tournament on Saturday. 

The win earned the Lobos an automatic berth in the NCAA Tournament, while the Aztecs await their next opponent during the NCAA Selection Show. 

“Obviously we’re disappointed, and we should be,” head coach Brian Dutcher said. “We wanted to hang a banner, win another Mountain West title, but it didn’t happen… but we can’t have a lingering effect over losing.”

On New Mexico’s end, guard Jaelen House had 28 points, guard Jamal Mashburn Jr. scored 21 and forward JT Toppin had a double-double to top the Aztecs. Toppin totaled 13 points and 11 rebounds. 

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Forward Jaedon LeDee finished the game with 25 points and went 11-for-11 on free throws, which were the most in a Mountain West championship game without a miss. He sank seven of his 12 shots, with his teammates only making 13 of 44. 

Mashburn scored 13 points, and House had 15 to lead the Lobos to a 36-30 advantage at halftime. New Mexico led at the most by 14 points, but LeDee had a three-point play and scored five points to ignite a 10-2 run to finish the half with momentum for San Diego State. 

The Lobos stayed ahead of the Scarlet and Black in the second half, before guard Reese Waters made a three-pointer that gave the Aztecs a 44-43 lead with 12:12 remaining in the game. The lead changed between teams six times up to when LeDee made four consecutive free throws to slim New Mexicos’ lead 54-51 with eight minutes in regulation.

SDSU took on a 59-57 lead off of two LeDee foul shots, before House hit a shot to tie the game. Toppin made a rebound basket to take the lead along with a layup, and House added a three-pointer in a game-sealing 8-0 run; the Lobos led 67-59 with 36 seconds left in the game. 

Guard Micah Parrish dribbles in the paint with a New Mexico defender draped against him. (Chinedu Nwoffiah)

Guard Lamont Butler spoke on the team’s struggles to score off of turnovers, noting New Mexico’s strengths. 

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“They were getting the ball on the rim, and they were able to get some good shots from House and Mashburn, and they were getting offensive rebounds,” Butler said. “It was really hard to pressure them because of how quick they are and how fast they are. It’s something that we’re going to learn from, and we’re going to figure it out.”

New Mexico won the Mountain West Championship title for the first time since its last NCAA Tournament appearance in 2014, and is the school’s 16th appearance overall. 

“We understand that it’s a 40-minute game and that if you are going to be behind, the best team to be behind is early,” Dutcher said. “So you’ve got time to fight back, and we fought back in every game. So I’m proud of how hard we are wired as a team and hopefully that leads to success in the NCAA Tournament.”

San Diego State reached the final after upsetting the top seed in the conference, 18th-ranked Utah State. 



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New Mexico

Mt. Taylor Ranger District to Implement Sawyer Prescribed Fire as early as April 23

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Mt. Taylor Ranger District to Implement Sawyer Prescribed Fire as early as April 23


Cibola National Forest & National Grasslands

ALBUQUERQUE, NM – April 22, 2024 – Pending favorable conditions, fire managers on the Cibola National Forest & National Grasslands (NF & NGs) may implement the previously announced Sawyer prescribed fire (RX) on the Mt. Taylor Ranger District as early as Tues. April 23, 2024. Smoke may be visible in the surrounding area of Ramah, Gallup, Thoreau, Bluewater, Grants and Millan.

Fire crews plan to burn approximately 706 acres on Sawyer located 3 miles west of Post Office Flats on Forest Road (FR) 480 in the Zuni Mountains. See map attached.

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Ignition will depend upon agency administrator approval and conditions within the ranges outlined in the prescribed fire plan. Desired conditions will result in effective smoke ventilation and dispersal and help achieve the effects needed to accomplish the burn plan objectives. 

The Cibola NF & NGs manages all prescribed fires in compliance with New Mexico state air quality and smoke management regulations. Smoke may settle into drainages and lower elevations at night but is expected to dissipate as daytime temperatures increase. Information on air quality and protecting your health can be found online at the www.airnow.gov/

Our land management strategy is centered on long-term forest health, including reducing forest fuels and using prescribed fire on the landscape. Prescribed fires are intended to reduce hazardous fuels accumulated due to drought, climate change, insects and disease, and decades of fire suppression. Additionally, fire managers use prescribed fire to improve forest health, remove hazardous fuels, increase firefighter safety, enhance wildlife habitat, and protect communities and watersheds. Prescribed burns are designed to meet specific objectives and are always managed with firefighter and public safety as the priority.

Implementation announcements and updates on prescribed fire projects will be posted on InciWeb, New Mexico Fire Information and on the Cibola NF & NGs website, Cibola Facebook and Cibola Twitter sites.

For more information on the Sawyer prescribed fire, contact the Mt. Taylor Ranger District Office at 505-287-8833 or Cibola National Forest and National Grasslands Supervisor’s Office: 505-346-3900

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Map for Mt. Taylor Ranger District Sawyer Prescribed Fire.





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An off-the-grid community in New Mexico offers insight into sustainable building

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An off-the-grid community in New Mexico offers insight into sustainable building


ABC News is taking a look at solutions for issues related to climate change and the environment with the series, “The Power of Us: People, The Climate, and Our Future.”

Near the Sangre de Cristo Mountains in Taos, New Mexico, a community built into the earth is living totally off-the-grid in mostly-recycled structures called Earthships.

ABC News Chief Meteorologist and Chief Climate Correspondent Ginger Zee along with her team, Dan Manzo and Lindsey Griswold, traveled to Taos to stay with the community and find out what everyone can be doing to live a bit more sustainably.

“Everybody on the planet can wake up in the morning and be comfortable without fossil fuel. Everybody can grow food in their house, everybody can have electricity from the sun and wind,” Michael Reynolds, founder and creator of Earthship Biotecture, told Zee. “These buildings do that.”

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Heating, cooling and powering buildings creates more greenhouse gas emissions than anything else in the U.S., according to the Environmental Protection Agency. Furthermore, construction and demolition create more than 500 million tons of debris each year in this country alone, the EPA said.

The community of over 100 Earthships in Taos is made of “living vessels” with gravel, old tires, concrete and other discarded materials like glass bottles.

Earthships are fully self-sustaining structures with timers for wifi and hot water use, according to Earthship Biotecture.

Reynolds said he uses rainwater four times over for different purposes in his home.

Michael Reynolds talks with ABC News Chief Meteorologist and Chief Climate Correspondent Ginger Zee outside Taos, New Mexico.

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ABC News

“I’m using five gallons — or three gallons of water to take a shower. That same three gallons of water waters my banana trees and my tomatoes,” Reynolds said. “That same three gallons of water is recollected to flush the toilet.”

Solar energy provides the homes with power, but it’s not used to heat or cool the structures. Earthships use trash as insulation to keep them comfortable inside.

Reynolds showed ABC News how Earthships are insulated with old tires filled with dirt.

“Each tire gets about four or five wheelbarrows of dirt pounded into them. So they’re basically like steel encased Adobe bricks,” Earthship Biotecture rental manager Hillary Hess told ABC News. “And the sun comes in and it hits that mass. And then the tire retains it. And as the temperature in here would drop, that heat would be released.”

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“You know, on a cold February night, you walk in one of these and you go, ‘This is amazing.’” Reynolds said. “This is warm and it’s freezing outside and there’s no heating system here. So if you’ve put people in a position to be able to experience it, then that’s huge.”

An ABC News team stayed in one of the structures in Taos for three days to understand how they work and what it feels like to live in one.

Hess said structure the team would be staying in is 5,400 square feet. Two thousand square feet of that is dedicated growing space.

PHOTO: Outside Taos, New Mexico, a community of Earthships offers off-the-grid living claiming to be the answer to building sustainability.

Outside Taos, New Mexico, a community of Earthships offers off-the-grid living claiming to be the answer to building sustainability.

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“In this house there’s two ponds in the greenhouse and we have tilapia out there,” she said. “So ideally, if you lived in this home, if you wanted, you could even be harvesting your own fish, chickens with eggs. And then you could catch a fish, pick your citrus, wrap it in a bag and leave and grill it out on the fire.”

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The small percentage of people living in Earthships aren’t the only ones saying traditional living and building arrangements need to change.

“The building industry currently is known to account for approximately 40% of greenhouse gas emissions,” Lola Ben-Alon, assistant professor at Columbia University Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation told ABC News. “It’s a really huge chunk of our industry in the world.”

Ben-Alon said there’s no one answer as to what makes up the most sustainable home.

“There’s no one solution,” she said. “It’s really a combination of principles and a combination of design thinking with the local environment and what is available and what is the climatic context, but also the material availability context and the labor context.”

Reynolds believes the principles of Earthships can be applied everywhere.

“Not everybody’s going to have an Earthship tomorrow,” Zee said. “If there had to be one thing from Earthships that we could apply to homes across America, what would be the most important?

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PHOTO: News Chief Meteorologist and Chief Climate Correspondent Ginger Zee sits with Earthship Biotecture founder and creator Michael Reynolds outside of an Earthship near Taos, New Mexico.

News Chief Meteorologist and Chief Climate Correspondent Ginger Zee sits with Earthship Biotecture founder and creator Michael Reynolds outside of an Earthship near Taos, New Mexico.

ABC News

“I think it starts with comfort,” Reynolds replied. “In other words, you can add a greenhouse on the south side of your house, and that will hit those rooms that are near that. You can even in New York City, you can get an apartment with south facing windows. You can become aware of the fact that heat comes from that thing, and you can catch that heat.”

In Santa Fe New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham talked with ABC News about Earthships and other sustainability efforts in the state

“How important is it to experiment with sustainability like that?” Zee asked. “Because that’s extreme.”

“I think all of that has incredible value,” Grisham said. “It is not the No. 1 investment in sustainable living, but it is really powerful.”

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“Just their water reuse and recycling in its last place, after using it four times, is to grow food. I mean, these are particularly for states in the Southwest arid states,” she added. “That innovation and knowing that you can live completely off the grid and have sustainable building materials all recycled, we can do more of that.”

For his part, Reynolds said the extremity is necessary.

“I used to try to tone it down because I know that I’m a fanatic about it, and I can’t expect other people to understand what I’ve been thinking about for decades,” he said. “So I try to water it down and tone it down, but now it’s like, ‘yeah, it’s not appropriate to tone it down.’ I mean, the solutions are the way forward on this planet. It’s going to have to be extreme.”



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Nice and calm to start the week, windy by Thursday and Friday

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Nice and calm to start the week, windy by Thursday and Friday


KOB 4 Meteorologist Brandon Richards takes a look at the nice and calm weather conditions for New Mexico.

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. – Warmer temperatures returns to eastern New Mexico on Monday thanks to drier southwest flow. 

Some virga showers and dry storms are possible across the west central high terrain Monday afternoon. 

Tuesday will be the warmest day of the week, except for locations in northeast New Mexico behind a backdoor front. 

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Winds begin picking up Wednesday, peaking Thursday as a disturbance moves through the Four Corners region.

Watch the video above for more from Meteorologist Brandon Richards.

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