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Nevada Sets State Record for Super Bowl Bets

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Nevada Sets State Record for Super Bowl Bets


The Super Bowl numbers coming out of Las Vegas continue to be massive.

After the Chiefs-49ers Super Bowl set a record as the most-watched event in the country’s history with an average U.S. audience of 123.4 million viewers, the Nevada Gaming Control Board reported $185.6 million in bets on the game across 182 sportsbooks—the most bet on a Super Bowl in any state’s history. 

The total bets were up 23% from 2023 and beat the previous record from ’22 of $179.8 million, according to data from the control board. The American Gaming Association, a casino trade group, estimated a record $23.1 billion would be bet on the game nationally. 

Las Vegas benefited from the additional tourism from the city’s first Big Game and tried to capitalize as local casinos held special events to cater to their loyal gamblers throughout the week. Despite the record wagers, sportsbooks took home only a small portion of the total bets, making just $6.8 million off the wagers, or 3.7%.

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A big reason, according to ESPN: The Chiefs and the over were both popular bets with the public, so Kansas City’s comeback win in overtime cashed most of those tickets.





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Nevada

‘Water does have a memory’: Indigenous lecturer stresses importance of conservation

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‘Water does have a memory’: Indigenous lecturer stresses importance of conservation


Looking out at a crowd of about 150, Melanie Smokey grinned as she told the story of her upbringing with Native American elders to a captive audience.

Smokey, who is of Western Shoshone and Washoe descent, argues the water we use every day is a resource worth saving.

“Water does have a memory,” she said. “It does have emotions and feelings, and we know that because it comes out of us.”

She was the first lecturer in the Nuwu Pasats Speakers Series, where members of Nevada’s Indigenous tribes will discuss the importance of natural resources. The series leads up to the opening of a new garden at the Springs Preserve in Las Vegas in the fall, where staff will grow native plants and describe their value to local tribes.

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Throughout the talk, Smokey shared different cultural traditions related to water and the land, such as the importance of willow plants used in traditional basket-weaving. Smokey’s grandparents, Art and Alice Hooper, were instrumental in establishing the reservation for the Yomba Shoshone Tribe in Nye County.

As tribal elders age and die off, it can be a challenge for those who belong to lesser-known tribes to make sure the language and culture doesn’t die with them, Smokey said.

“Our people pray this forward with tears, even. Their sacred water praying for all of us to be here today,” she said. “One day, like these willows, you can be formed into something good.”

Preserving the Southern Paiute culture

Before the lecture, Springs Preserve archaeologist Ian Ford-Terry led nearly 60 people on a walking tour of the botanical gardens where staff are beginning to grow seeds for the new garden with the help of the federal Bureau of Land Management.

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Not only will the garden help bolster native plants in the valley, but there are efforts underway to make the garden a historical site that will feature audio clips of the native language, thanks to the help of a group of Southern Paiutes.

Native American culture and native plants coming together at the garden will hopefully make the Southern Paiutes more visible, he said.

“That’s one of the reasons why we’re really focusing on those plants,” Ford-Terry said. “They can teach us about how to live better in a balanced way.”

Kenny Anderson, the Las Vegas Paiute Tribal Council’s cultural committee chairman who is leading the language preservation effort, said he’s thrilled to see so much interest in preserving the culture of the Southern Paiutes, who don’t have a recognized historical footprint in Las Vegas.

“To me, it’s a good thing that we’re going to try to help people understand the history of the Paiutes of this area and learn how they survived,” Anderson said.

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Contact Alan at ahalaly@reviewjournal.com. Follow @AlanHalaly on Twitter.





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Nevada auto burglars arrested in Utah for using stolen credit cards

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Nevada auto burglars arrested in Utah for using stolen credit cards


ST. GEORGE (KTNV) — Three people accused of breaking into vehicles in Nevada have been arrested in Utah for allegedly using stolen credit cards.

According to the St. George Police Department, police officers responded to reports of a suspicious white van and a black Cadillac SUV. When officers arrived, the black SUV took off. However, officers were able to speak to two men and a woman inside the van. Officers detained all three because they could smell marijuana.

While attempting to identify the three people, police said one of the men provided multiple fake names and birth dates. Officers did find paperwork in the vehicle to identify him and dispatch said there was a warrant for his arrest out of Colorado and he was facing homicide charges. Police also found multiple knives and drug paraphernalia on the man.

Police also said the three were involved in multiple vehicle burglaries in Nevada and were attempting to use the stolen credit cards in Utah. They are facing multiple charges.

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Police haven’t identified any of the suspects by name, as of Saturday afternoon.





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LETTER: Red-light cameras for Southern Nevada a no-brainer

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LETTER: Red-light cameras for Southern Nevada a no-brainer


I find it laughable when I read letters to the editor from people against red-light cameras. The Clark County sheriff is right, we need them.

I purchased my home in 1999, and I came from New York City. Over the past couple of years, many of the people who moved here came with bad driving habits. There is not one day I go out that I don’t see someone running a red light or speeding. I constantly see people speeding through school zones and not paying attention to the flashing lights, or I see people making their own lane just to go around other drivers.

New York has had red-light cameras for years, and it does not cause accidents. It makes people slow down.

We also need speed cameras around this town, especially in school zones. They installed them in all the boroughs in New York, and it is amazing to see people actually watch their speed.

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My auto insurance has gone up in the past two years by about $1,000. Something has to be done. We have to stop the idiots on our roads who think they are the only ones driving.



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