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Nevada County ramping up investments in wildfire mitigation: Qualified vendors encouraged to apply

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Nevada County ramping up investments in wildfire mitigation: Qualified vendors encouraged to apply


With over 90% of Nevada County identified by CAL FIRE as being within a high or very high fire hazard severity zone, it is no surprise that wildfire mitigation is a top priority for Nevada County.

Emergency Preparedness has been a Board Objective for over a decade, and the Office of Emergency Services (OES) has taken a proactive approach under the Ready Nevada County initiative, securing investment for projects at the individual, community, and landscape level. In 2024, OES is working to prevent wildfires with 12 hazardous fuels reduction projects totaling over $13.5 million in funding from five different state and federal agencies. These projects will treat over 5,000 acres and 300 road miles thanks to funding support from CAL FIRE, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), United States Forest Service (USFS), Sierra Nevada Conservancy, Wildlife Conservation Board, and others.



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Nevada

Dozens of Double Voting Cases in Nevada Sent to Police, by Victor Joecks

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Dozens of Double Voting Cases in Nevada Sent to Police, by Victor Joecks


Voter fraud is such a problem in Nevada that even a Democrat elected official is begrudgingly acknowledging it.

Nevada Secretary of State Francisco Aguilar recently put out a report on election security. His office investigated 146 instances of potential double voting in the 2022 general election. The report labeled 76 of the cases as “criminal.” Of those, 44 have been “referred for investigation” to the Nevada Department of Public Safety. Another three were sent to the attorney general’s office for prosecution. The remaining 29 were “closed by SOS, no action.” Also, there are open investigations on 26 cases of “possible cross-state votes.”

But instead of acknowledging that the system is vulnerable to fraud, Aguilar wants to downplay it.

“There is no evidence of widespread voter fraud in Nevada, at any point in our state’s history,” he said.

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That statement is an attempt to deflect from a few important points. For one, even small amounts of voter fraud can swing elections. In 2020, Republican Clark County Commission candidate Stavros Anthony lost his race to Ross Miller by 15 votes. There were more than 150,000 ballots cast in that race. Then-registrar of voters Joe Gloria said his office found 139 discrepancies it couldn’t explain in that contest. But the Democrats on the Clark County Commission certified Miller as the winner anyway.

Next, these double voting cases reveal flaws in Nevada’s election system. Take an example cited in the report as a “civil notice.” A father and son with the same name live at the same address. “The son votes in person,” the report states. “The dad mistakenly fills out his son’s ballot and mails it” in, the report states. The ballot is flagged and not counted. The father isn’t charged because it was accidental.

In one sense, the system worked because it caught the ballot. But there’s still a failure here. The father lost his vote because Nevada mails ballots to all active voters. If individuals had to request an absentee ballot, that likely wouldn’t have happened.

Finally, while the SOS’s report confirms fraud is possible, it doesn’t show how big the problem is. The system can catch someone who sends a mail-in ballot and then tries to vote in person. But how can it stop, much less prosecute, someone who picks up ballots from the trash can of an apartment complex? How can it stop someone from voting with a ballot they receive for a past resident of their home? The tests that I’ve run show signature verification is a deeply flawed security measure.

Another potential problem is voting by noncitizens. Nevada automatically registers them when they visit the DMV and sends them a ballot. In 2021, then-Secretary of State Barbara Cegavske’s office identified more than 5,300 registered voters “who presented an immigration document” when getting a driver’s license. It found 4,057 of them had voted in the 2020 election. It’s possible some had become citizens after receiving their driver’s license. It’s also possible many hadn’t and voted anyway. The SOS’s office refused to investigate further.

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I asked the SOS’s office a number of pointed questions. For instance, what proactive steps does it take to investigate the integrity of the system and the effectiveness of signature verification? Is it taking steps to identify and remove noncitizens from the voter rolls? Does it believe those committing fraud will announce it after the election?

Cecilia Heston, the SOS’s public information officer, said she was working on the answers. I didn’t hear from her again. No surprise. Easier for her boss to ignore hard questions than acknowledge these problems.

Perhaps there’s “no evidence of widespread voter fraud” because Aguilar — like Democrats around the country — is sticking his head in the sand and wants you to do the same.

Victor Joecks is a columnist for the Las Vegas Review-Journal. Email him at [email protected] or follow @victorjoecks on X. To find out more about Victor Joecks and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate website at www.creators.com.

Photo credit: Element5 Digital at Unsplash

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Who has the most prep baseball state titles in Nevada?

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Who has the most prep baseball state titles in Nevada?


The root of Southern Nevada’s rich baseball history starts with the high school game. Many of the MLB players from Las Vegas started their ascension to stardom by winning state titles in high school.

The next potential big leaguers are gearing up to win their first state title or help their programs add to their history of winning with the high school playoffs approaching.

Here’s a look at who has won the most Nevada high school baseball state championships:

T5. Five schools with 8

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Bishop Manogue, Boulder City, Green Valley, Needles and Rancho are tied for the fifth-most state titles with eight.

Green Valley won six straight titles from 1993 to 1998 under legendary coach Rodger Fairless, which is the second-most consecutive state titles behind Bishop Gorman’s seven (2006 to 2012). Green Valley’s last title was in 2003 with current College of Southern Nevada coach Nick Garritano leading the Gators.

Rancho won three straight titles from 1959 to 1961. Its last title came in 1976. Boulder City’s most recent title was in 2017.

No. 4 Bishop Gorman (9)

Gorman added to its baseball legacy by winning its ninth state title last season. The Gaels rolled to a 35-2 record to win their first state title since 2015.

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The Gaels won their first baseball state title in 2006 and went on to win seven straight. Coach Chris Sheff led Gorman to titles from 2006 to 2010 and last season.

Gorman’s 2009 title-winning team could be considered the most dominant, as the Gaels set the state record for most consecutive wins (35), runs scored (561), hits (572) and team batting average (.463) that season.

T1. Three schools with 10

Virgin Valley, Churchill County and Lincoln County are tied with the most state titles with 10 each. Virgin Valley’s last title came in 2022.

Churchill County, located in Fallon, won the third- and fourth-ever baseball titles in state history (1957 and 1958). Its last title came in 2015.

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Lincoln County, located in Panaca, won four straight titles from 2016 to 2019, which was its most recent title.

Contact Alex Wright at awright@reviewjournal.com. Follow @AlexWright1028 on X.





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Fury erupts in Las Vegas community as residents push back against massive Mormon temple that would stand 216-feet high and tower over their quiet streets

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Fury erupts in Las Vegas community as residents push back against massive Mormon temple that would stand 216-feet high and tower over their quiet streets


Angry residents in a Nevada town are doing everything they can to stop the Mormon church from erecting a 216-foot temple in their neighborhood.

Although residents in the Lone Mountain neighborhood of Las Vegas insist that their frustration doesn’t stem from any issue with the Mormon religion, they are nevertheless opposed to the temple’s construction. 

The Lone Mountain townsfolk fear that the proposed 87,000-square-foot temple will disrupt their rural lifestyle and lead to further development.  In particular, they are concerned with the temple’s planned height- 216 feet- which will dwarf the rest of the buildings in the area.

‘It’s going to stick out like a sore thumb in the middle of a rural setting,’ resident Brinton Marsden told 8news.

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Residents of Lone Mountain, a small and sleepy community in Las Vegas, are up in arms about the Mormon church’s plans to construct an enormous temple in their neighborhood, pictured: a mock-up of the proposed temple

In Lone Mountain, homes are required to stand no higher than two stories. The 216-foot temple would dwarf all buildings in the area. In order to illustrate just how much taller the temple would be, some residents floated a balloon 216 feet high in the air on Saturday

In Lone Mountain, homes are required to stand no higher than two stories. The 216-foot temple would dwarf all buildings in the area. In order to illustrate just how much taller the temple would be, some residents floated a balloon 216 feet high in the air on Saturday

In late March, 12 locals and members of the Northwest Rural Preservation Association, an organization that aims to preserve the rich rural culture in the Lone Mountain area, expressed their anxiety about the project.

Marsden, a member and long-time inhabitant of the area, said the large building would be lit up ’24/7′ over their quiet town.

Marsden also cited the Interlocal Agreement between the City of Las Vegas and Clark County, a document meant to protect the community from more populous urban planning.

‘For instance, no home can be built on less than a half-acre,’ he said.

‘It has to be a single-family home no taller than two stories.’ 

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The organization’s treasurer, Erin DeLoe, expressed a fear the area’s pleasant and serene dark skies would vanish once the temple, with all its bright lights, was constructed.

About 15 other members of the community joined the resident when he launched the balloon

About 15 other members of the community joined the resident when he launched the balloon 

Brinton Marsden (pictured), a longtime member of the community, said the temple was 'going to stick out like a sore thumb in the middle of a rural setting'

Brinton Marsden (pictured), a longtime member of the community, said the temple was ‘going to stick out like a sore thumb in the middle of a rural setting’

Northwest Rural Preservation Association treasurer Erin DeLoe (pictured) said: 'We have no streetlights, no curbs, no gutters, and no sidewalks, and that's what we like'

Northwest Rural Preservation Association treasurer Erin DeLoe (pictured) said: ‘We have no streetlights, no curbs, no gutters, and no sidewalks, and that’s what we like’

‘We have no streetlights, no curbs, no gutters, and no sidewalks, and that’s what we like,’ DeLoe said. ‘This structure will be as tall as the Durango Casino.’

Both Marsden and DeLoe were adamant their objection to the temple had nothing to do with the Mormon faith.

‘If the Catholic Church wanted to build a basilica across the street, I’d be against that too,’ Marsden said. ‘This is not a religious thing at all.’ 

DeLoe added: ‘I value their faith, and what they have taught their people.’

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‘I don’t want this to be taken as an affront to their beliefs because that’s not it at all, it’s the building.’

This past Saturday, residents in Lone Mountain took action to illustrate the proposed height of the new Mormon temple.

An aggrieved local purchased seven-foot helium balloon, which they then floated above the Lone Mountain area at 216 feet – the proposed height of the temple.

The balloon, which could withstand 15mph, was affixed to two cinderblocks to anchor it. Around 15 community members walked over to the balloon’s launch site and stood in solidarity.

Matt Hackley, a Lone Mountain resident, said: ‘We as the neighbors are trying to battle against this project.’

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‘It does not fit the neighborhood.’

Like Brinton Marsden, Hackley also invoked the Interlocal Agreement. 

‘It does not fit along within the guidelines of what the rest of the neighborhood has to follow.’ 

‘Our homes are asked to be 35 feet maximum, and the LDS community is asking for their temple to be 216 feet.’

Although the Interlocal Agreement could indeed tie up future construction on the temple, a recent report conducted by the City of Las Vegas concluded that the Mormon temple would not be in violation – as the agreement does not address religious or government facilities. 

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One local resident complained that their houses were required to be under 35 feet in height, while the proposed temple would be 216 feet tall

One local resident complained that their houses were required to be under 35 feet in height, while the proposed temple would be 216 feet tall

The lot (pictured) on which the Mormon church hopes to build encompasses some 20 acres- enough to contain the proposed 87,000-square-foot bulk of the temple

The lot (pictured) on which the Mormon church hopes to build encompasses some 20 acres- enough to contain the proposed 87,000-square-foot bulk of the temple

Bud Stoddard, stake president of the Las Vegas Lone Mountain Stake of the Mormon church, told 8news that he believed that the 3,000 members he represents approve of the temple.

Stoddard explained he was aware of the community’s concerns, but the power to alter the temple’s height was not vested in him.

The lot the Mormon church hopes to build on amounts to 20 acres.  

The massive temple would stand between North Grand Canyon Drive and Tee Pee Lane. The Lone Mountain temple would be the second Mormon temple in Las Vegas and the fourth in the state of Nevada.



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