Connect with us

Nevada

Musk shifts Neuralink incorporation from Delaware to Nevada as he rails against $55 billion pay ruling

Published

on

Musk shifts Neuralink incorporation from Delaware to Nevada as he rails against $55 billion pay ruling


Elon Musk has shifted the incorporation location of his brain-chip implant company Neuralink out of Delaware, reincorporating it in Nevada, Bloomberg reported.

The company completed the move on Thursday, it said in a notice sent to shareholders, per the report.

Musk quickly made his feelings clear about the decisions in a series of posts on X, formerly Twitter.

“Never incorporate your company in the state of Delaware,” he said in one post.

Advertisement

“I recommend incorporating in Nevada or Texas if you prefer shareholders to decide matters,” he added.

Musk previously moved the incorporation location of X to Nevada from Delaware after he changed its name, Bloomberg reported.

Musk has also signaled his intent to reincorporate Tesla, again moving the company out of Delaware.

Following the ruling to void Musk’s $55 billion payout, the Tesla CEO shared a poll on his X profile, asking if the company should move its incorporation to Texas.

“The public vote is unequivocally in favor of Texas,” he wrote after the results showed those who responded were 87.1% in favor of the move. “Tesla will move immediately to hold a shareholder vote to transfer state of incorporation to Texas.”

Advertisement

Delaware, home to 1.3 million legal entities, is known as the US’s incorporation capital, with more than 60% of the nation’s Fortune 500 companies incorporated there, according to the state’s official website.

The state is attractive to large businesses thanks to long-standing legal precedents, access to expert corporate lawyers, and the state’s corporate law statute offering “predictability and stability.”

neuralink elon musk

Getty Images

Neuralink carried out its first human brain implant in January, with the patient said to be recovering well, Musk said.

The company says its initial goal is to find a way of allowing humans to control a computer keyboard or cursor with their thoughts.





Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Nevada

NV Energy proposes monthly service charge jump of $28 in Northern Nevada – Nevada Current

Published

on

NV Energy proposes monthly service charge jump of $28 in Northern Nevada – Nevada Current


The basic service charge of $16.50 paid monthly by NV Energy customers in Northern Nevada could increase to $44.40 if the utility has its way. 

The utility says the move is a means of reducing a $7.8 million subsidy paid by ratepayers who buy electricity from the utility, to the benefit of solar rooftop customers, who generate their own electricity for the most part, but remain on the power company’s grid.   

Sierra Pacific Power Company, NV Energy’s northern subsidiary, filed a general rate case last week seeking to increase revenue by $95 million for capital, as well as operating and management costs.  

Kevin McGehee, lobbyist for the Nevada Solar PAC, agrees customers who buy electricity from the utility are subsidizing those with rooftop solar and says increasing the monthly service fee is a reasonable means of addressing the disparity. 

Advertisement

“Any increase in rates makes solar more attractive,” McGehee said in an interview.  

Customers with rooftop solar currently pay NV Energy $16.50 in Northern Nevada and $18.50 in Southern Nevada to distribute energy. Customers who buy their energy from the utility pay the same, in addition to the electricity they use. 

The average bills incurred by net metering customers was $48 in 2022, $54 in 2023, and is forecasted to be $51 in 2024, including the proposed service fee increase and decrease in rates. 

‘The movement to cost-based levels limits intra-class customer subsidies,” NV Energy argues in the rate hike request. “This is specifically impactful given the required calculation of combining fully bundled residential customers and NEM (net metering) customers in rate design.”  

“The higher prices in 2023 resulted in a challenging year for our customers, as they experienced the highest bills in the last decade,” NV Energy said in testimony on the proposed rate hike, adding it projects bills will decline during the next two years. 

Advertisement

Bills in Southern Nevada are expected to decrease, as well, given the decline in natural gas prices. 

NV Energy suggests that by the end of 2024, its base tariff energy rate and deferred energy adjustment will be down 19% from the end of 2023. 

“This decrease is greater than the proposed 9% overall effective rate increase,” which includes the higher monthly service charge,” resulting in an overall 10% decrease, according to the utility.   

NV Energy says the average bill for Northern Nevada ratepayers is forecasted to be $111 this year, including the proposed increase, down from $118 last year.

The increase in the monthly service charge could be especially burdensome to low-income residents who use less energy but will be on the hook for the higher service charge. 

Advertisement

NV Energy says the additional revenue is needed to cover the “increased cost of debt and requested return on investment,” as well as “higher day-to-day costs” including a return to pre-pandemic staffing levels, increased insurance expenses and “overall inflationary pressures on the supply chain.” 

In January, NV Energy increased the monthly service charge in Southern Nevada from $12.50 to $18.50, as part of its general rate case, which the utility was previously required to submit every three years. A bill passed by the Nevada Legislature last year allows utilities to submit general rate cases more frequently.



Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Nevada

Nevada and other swing states need more poll workers. Can lawyers help fill the gap?

Published

on

Nevada and other swing states need more poll workers. Can lawyers help fill the gap?


RENO, Nev. — (AP) — With Nevada counties struggling to find poll workers in a pivotal election year, the top election official in the Western swing state is taking a page from his counterparts elsewhere and is asking the legal community to help fill the gap.

Secretary of State Cisco Aguilar wants lawyers who volunteer at the polls to be able to earn continuing education credits to fulfill annual requirements set by the State Bar of Nevada.

It’s a signal of how lawyers are increasingly seen as ideal candidates for stepping in as poll workers, as the positions have grown harder to fill as once-obscure county election departments have been thrust into the spotlight.

Aguilar likens it to how doctors and nurses stepped up during the pandemic.

Advertisement

“Everybody needed medical care during the time of COVID. … And this is a time when we need poll workers,” Aguilar told The Associated Press. “That legal community can stand up and protect the Constitution.”

From swing states like Michigan to conservative strongholds like Tennessee and Iowa, election officials have been tapping lawyers and law students as they struggle to fill poll worker spots — a challenge that has become more difficult amid changing procedures and hostility stemming from former President Donald Trump’s claims of a stolen election in 2020.

Other recruiting campaigns have focused on veterans and librarians. In 2020, LeBron James helped spearhead an initiative to help turnout in critical swing states and combat Black voter suppression, in no small part by recruiting poll workers.

Poll workers are on the front lines of increasingly contentious environments — ushering people in, answering technical questions and using a handful of training hours to essentially act as guides for a process where disagreements and misinformation can stir up strong emotions.

Since 2020, eight states have adopted policies to allow poll working duties to count toward credits needed to maintain a law license, and national advocates hope more are on the way.

Advertisement

After pitching the idea at a conference earlier this month, a group of bar association presidents now is tailoring the initiative to individual county election offices, rather than blanket approval from the bar associations for entire states.

“Lawyers are careful, and I respect that. I’m one of them, and it takes a while to process,” said Jason Kaune, chair of the American Bar Association’s standing committee on election law, of getting the initiative approved by state bar associations. “This is just a quicker way to get some real results on the ground.”

For Aguilar, his proposal in Nevada — where turnover has ravaged local election departments since 2020 — is part of a wider plan to protect election workers, whom he refers to as “heroes of democracy.”

Since defeating a Republican election denier in the 2022 midterms, Aguilar has sought to create a better environment for election employees. Last year, he pushed a bill signed by Republican Gov. Joe Lombardo that made it a felony to harass, intimidate or use force on election workers performing their duties in Nevada.

Aguilar also hopes that this latest initiative will strengthen the pipeline of full-time election workers with those already well-versed in the law.

Advertisement

Aguilar had hoped the State Bar of Nevada would have implemented his proposal before Nevada’s Feb. 6 presidential preference primary, but the secretary of state’s office has yet to make a formal request for the association to consider, per the State Bar.

During Nevada’s first-in-the-West presidential preference primaries, many election departments scrambled to find poll workers up until the last minute — particularly in rural areas.

In the state’s two most populous counties — Clark County, which includes Las Vegas, and Washoe County, which includes Reno — all poll worker slots were fully staffed by the start of early voting, according to county and state election offices. But they’ll need more before the June primary and November general elections.

In rural Douglas County, officials recruited 46 poll workers — far short of the 120 needed, clerk-treasurer Amy Burgans said. Lyon County also came up short with 32 of 45 poll workers needed, clerk-treasurer Staci Lindberg said.

Nevada’s concentrated educational landscape could make it difficult for lawyers and law students to spread across many of the state’s far-flung counties, which are some of the largest yet least populated in the country. The University of Nevada, Las Vegas is home to the state’s only law school.

Advertisement

And of the 12,000 attorneys licensed to practice law in Nevada, half are in Clark County, about 14% are in Washoe County and just under 3% are located in the state’s rural counties outside the state capital, according to data from the State Bar of Nevada.

Burgans said she doesn’t know if any lawyers in Douglas County — which borders a large chunk of Lake Tahoe — would take up the offer to earn credit by working at the polls. “But I will tell you that anything that Secretary Aguilar can do to assist us is appreciated by me and the clerks across the state,” she said.

Poll workers have been particularly difficult to find in Douglas County, partly because it has an abundance of part-time residents and there was widespread confusion recently over a state-run primary happening two days before a Nevada GOP-run caucus.

Burgans also noted there’s some fear around becoming an election worker.

For the first time, she had to set up training after letters containing fentanyl were mailed to election officials in several states including Nevada. With a background in law enforcement, Burgans also set up active shooter training. Like election officials across the state, she received emails and calls from voters frustrated about dueling Republican nominating processes earlier this month but said there had been no direct threats.

Advertisement

Humboldt County Clerk Tami Rae Spero said the impact of legal education credits for working the polls could be “minimal.” Still, she appreciates the effort and said it could be a steppingstone for similar programs that could better reach her county with its population of just over 17,000. One option might be offering community college or high school credits, she said.

Aguilar is more optimistic that the program can reach all corners of the state.

“I think there are some people who are pretty driven by the mission and understand the importance of poll workers and understand the process of democracy,” he said. “So they’ll make extraordinary efforts to make sure that happens.”

___

Stern is a corps member for The Associated Press/Report for America Statehouse News Initiative. Report for America is a nonprofit service program that places journalists in local newsrooms. Follow Stern on X: @gabestern326.

Advertisement





Source link

Continue Reading

Nevada

Legendary Nevadans Part III: This One’s for the Ladies | NV History

Published

on

Legendary Nevadans Part III: This One’s for the Ladies | NV History


In honor of Women’s History Month, we decided to feature a few of the famous women in Nevada who figured prominently in the state’s history. From political firsts to a local sheriff, these women proved there were no bounds on their ambition or their impact on Nevada life.



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending