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Fury erupts in Las Vegas community as residents push back against massive Mormon temple that would stand 216-feet high and tower over their quiet streets

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Fury erupts in Las Vegas community as residents push back against massive Mormon temple that would stand 216-feet high and tower over their quiet streets


Angry residents in a Nevada town are doing everything they can to stop the Mormon church from erecting a 216-foot temple in their neighborhood.

Although residents in the Lone Mountain neighborhood of Las Vegas insist that their frustration doesn’t stem from any issue with the Mormon religion, they are nevertheless opposed to the temple’s construction. 

The Lone Mountain townsfolk fear that the proposed 87,000-square-foot temple will disrupt their rural lifestyle and lead to further development.  In particular, they are concerned with the temple’s planned height- 216 feet- which will dwarf the rest of the buildings in the area.

‘It’s going to stick out like a sore thumb in the middle of a rural setting,’ resident Brinton Marsden told 8news.

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Residents of Lone Mountain, a small and sleepy community in Las Vegas, are up in arms about the Mormon church’s plans to construct an enormous temple in their neighborhood, pictured: a mock-up of the proposed temple

In Lone Mountain, homes are required to stand no higher than two stories. The 216-foot temple would dwarf all buildings in the area. In order to illustrate just how much taller the temple would be, some residents floated a balloon 216 feet high in the air on Saturday

In Lone Mountain, homes are required to stand no higher than two stories. The 216-foot temple would dwarf all buildings in the area. In order to illustrate just how much taller the temple would be, some residents floated a balloon 216 feet high in the air on Saturday

In late March, 12 locals and members of the Northwest Rural Preservation Association, an organization that aims to preserve the rich rural culture in the Lone Mountain area, expressed their anxiety about the project.

Marsden, a member and long-time inhabitant of the area, said the large building would be lit up ’24/7′ over their quiet town.

Marsden also cited the Interlocal Agreement between the City of Las Vegas and Clark County, a document meant to protect the community from more populous urban planning.

‘For instance, no home can be built on less than a half-acre,’ he said.

‘It has to be a single-family home no taller than two stories.’ 

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The organization’s treasurer, Erin DeLoe, expressed a fear the area’s pleasant and serene dark skies would vanish once the temple, with all its bright lights, was constructed.

About 15 other members of the community joined the resident when he launched the balloon

About 15 other members of the community joined the resident when he launched the balloon 

Brinton Marsden (pictured), a longtime member of the community, said the temple was 'going to stick out like a sore thumb in the middle of a rural setting'

Brinton Marsden (pictured), a longtime member of the community, said the temple was ‘going to stick out like a sore thumb in the middle of a rural setting’

Northwest Rural Preservation Association treasurer Erin DeLoe (pictured) said: 'We have no streetlights, no curbs, no gutters, and no sidewalks, and that's what we like'

Northwest Rural Preservation Association treasurer Erin DeLoe (pictured) said: ‘We have no streetlights, no curbs, no gutters, and no sidewalks, and that’s what we like’

‘We have no streetlights, no curbs, no gutters, and no sidewalks, and that’s what we like,’ DeLoe said. ‘This structure will be as tall as the Durango Casino.’

Both Marsden and DeLoe were adamant their objection to the temple had nothing to do with the Mormon faith.

‘If the Catholic Church wanted to build a basilica across the street, I’d be against that too,’ Marsden said. ‘This is not a religious thing at all.’ 

DeLoe added: ‘I value their faith, and what they have taught their people.’

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‘I don’t want this to be taken as an affront to their beliefs because that’s not it at all, it’s the building.’

This past Saturday, residents in Lone Mountain took action to illustrate the proposed height of the new Mormon temple.

An aggrieved local purchased seven-foot helium balloon, which they then floated above the Lone Mountain area at 216 feet – the proposed height of the temple.

The balloon, which could withstand 15mph, was affixed to two cinderblocks to anchor it. Around 15 community members walked over to the balloon’s launch site and stood in solidarity.

Matt Hackley, a Lone Mountain resident, said: ‘We as the neighbors are trying to battle against this project.’

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‘It does not fit the neighborhood.’

Like Brinton Marsden, Hackley also invoked the Interlocal Agreement. 

‘It does not fit along within the guidelines of what the rest of the neighborhood has to follow.’ 

‘Our homes are asked to be 35 feet maximum, and the LDS community is asking for their temple to be 216 feet.’

Although the Interlocal Agreement could indeed tie up future construction on the temple, a recent report conducted by the City of Las Vegas concluded that the Mormon temple would not be in violation – as the agreement does not address religious or government facilities. 

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One local resident complained that their houses were required to be under 35 feet in height, while the proposed temple would be 216 feet tall

One local resident complained that their houses were required to be under 35 feet in height, while the proposed temple would be 216 feet tall

The lot (pictured) on which the Mormon church hopes to build encompasses some 20 acres- enough to contain the proposed 87,000-square-foot bulk of the temple

The lot (pictured) on which the Mormon church hopes to build encompasses some 20 acres- enough to contain the proposed 87,000-square-foot bulk of the temple

Bud Stoddard, stake president of the Las Vegas Lone Mountain Stake of the Mormon church, told 8news that he believed that the 3,000 members he represents approve of the temple.

Stoddard explained he was aware of the community’s concerns, but the power to alter the temple’s height was not vested in him.

The lot the Mormon church hopes to build on amounts to 20 acres.  

The massive temple would stand between North Grand Canyon Drive and Tee Pee Lane. The Lone Mountain temple would be the second Mormon temple in Las Vegas and the fourth in the state of Nevada.



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Nevada

150-acre wildfire burning southwest of Las Vegas

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150-acre wildfire burning southwest of Las Vegas


LAS VEGAS (KTNV) — Crews are working on putting out a wildfire that is burning southwest of Las Vegas.

According to the Bureau of Land Management, the fire started at 11:40 a.m. near the Late Night Trailhead, which is seven miles east of Mountain Springs along State Route 160.

It was originally 25 acres. At 4:15 p.m., BLM officials estimated the fire was 50 acres and was now burning in the Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area.

Wildfire officials gave an update at 5:15 p.m. and said the fire had grown to 150 acres. However, they added the fire perimeter has not been mapped by GPS so an exact size of the fire is not yet available. As of 7 p.m., the BLM said the fire is 15% contained.

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Approximately 30 firefighters have been assigned to the fire, including four engines, and two Single Engine Air Tankers. During the most recent update, BLM officials said they anticipate additional firefighters to arrive on Tuesday to help and the goal is to contain the entire fire by 6 p.m.

No structures are threatened and no roads have been closed. No injuries have been reported.

BLM officials have named it the Bird Springs Fire and state the fire was caused by humans and is under investigation.

Wildfire season in Nevada runs from May through October. Channel 13 previously spoke to wildland firefighters who said they are ready for this season.

WATCH: Here’s how local wildland firefighters are preparing

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‘We’re ready’: Las Vegas valley wildland firefighters are preparing for fire season

They also laid out some tips for preventing wildfires.

  • Clear dead vegetation (trees, grass, leaves, etc.) from around your home to limit the potential fire fuel.
  • Properly soak and dispose of cigarette butts, charcoal briquettes, and any other material that can start fires.
  • Equip all-terrain vehicles with spark arrestors.

Clark County officials are also reminding everyone that only “safe and sane” fireworks are allowed in Clark County and local cities and that is only from June 28 through July 4.
No fireworks of any kind are allowed at Clark County Wetlands Park and other local parks, or on public lands in the region, including Mount Charleston, Lake Mead, and Red Rock Canyon.

Offenders caught using illegal fireworks in unincorporated County areas and the city of Las Vegas face a minimum fine of $500. Legislation approved in 2021 by the Nevada State Legislature allows for fines of up to $10,000 for large amounts of illegal fireworks found within the community.

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Residents are urged not to call 911 to report illegal fireworks to keep 911 free for life-threatening emergencies. Instead, the public is asked to report location complaints about illegal fireworks over the holiday online by clicking here.





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Nevadans honor veterans’ ‘ultimate sacrifice’ on Memorial Day — PHOTOS

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Nevadans honor veterans’ ‘ultimate sacrifice’ on Memorial Day — PHOTOS


This Memorial Day brought Army veteran Doug Rogness back to his time as a commercial pilot.

For years, he took the pilot’s seat for United Airlines. But perhaps his most important flight was bringing home the remains of First Lt. Jared Landaker, a Marine who died in 2007 in Iraq War combat.

Landaker’s legacy lives on today through the Seven Stars Foundation, an organization Rogness was reminded of Monday as local veterans and their families reflected on the sacrifices made to defend the United States.

“There’s a lot of people out there who have sacrificed for what we have today,” said Rogness, who now lives in Henderson. “There’s a lot of people who don’t appreciate that.”

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Rogness was one of hundreds of Nevadans who gathered in Boulder City’s Southern Nevada Veterans Memorial Cemetery on Monday afternoon to honor both lives lost and time served in the U.S. military. Among the crowd were politicians like Rep. Susie Lee and Rep. Dina Titus, D-Las Vegas, and Las Vegas mayoral candidate Shelley Berkley.

Defending the country is no easy task or one that should be taken for granted, Rogness said. Over time, the 72-year-old said he’s noticed younger generations seem to take less interest in what’s happening with geopolitical conflict.

“Everyone used to be really involved, whether you were here at home or you were out fighting,” he said.

‘Respect, sacrifice and service’

Across the sprawling grounds of the cemetery Monday were a slew of American flags. Thirty-four thousand, one hundred of them, to be exact, representing each of the fallen soldiers who are memorialized within the cemetery’s 79 acres.

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Col. Mary Devine, director of the Nevada Division of Veterans Services, said groups of volunteers set up the flags throughout the weekend as a physical representation of shared pride.

“Today, we use small American flags as a symbol of our respect, sacrifice and service for our fallen who did not make it home,” she said.

Instead of a scheduled keynote speech from Gov. Joe Lombardo, state Office of Energy head Dwayne McClinton spoke to the crowd about what he learned during his time in the Marines.

He noted Nevada’s official list of fallen heroes in the Nevada State Capitol Building that tallies 895 state residents who died in conflict. Everyone with a family member who served in the Armed Forces has made “the ultimate sacrifice,” McClinton said about those who have suffered the pain of losing a fallen loved one.

“The debt we owe you is one we can never repay,” McClinton said. “There will never be a ceremony or a tribute that will ease the pain.”

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Veterans groups from around Southern Nevada also showed their support.

Valerie Pizarro, vice president of the Firefighter Memorial Transport, said her volunteer organization is involved in processionals for fallen first responders in the region. Her husband Frank founded the nonprofit largely because of what he witnessed as a first responder during the 9/11 terrorist attack on New York City.

Pizarro, whose brothers and father also served, said it’s vital for everyone to understand what military families give up for a sense of collective safety.

“We know many people from the Vietnam War days,” said Pizarro, who grew up on the Fort Leonard Wood military base in Missouri. “I was small, but I was aware because many of my friends’ fathers and brothers didn’t come home.”

Contact Alan Halaly at ahalaly@reviewjournal.com. Follow @AlanHalaly on X.

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Nevada Lithium CEO sees big upside at Bonnie Claire with new boron discovery

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Nevada Lithium CEO sees big upside at Bonnie Claire with new boron discovery


About Angela Harmantas

Angela Harmantas is an Editor at Proactive. She has over 15 years of experience covering the equity markets in North America, with a particular focus on junior resource stocks. Angela has reported from numerous countries around the world, including Canada, the US, Australia, Brazil, Ghana, and South Africa for leading trade publications. Previously, she worked in investor relations and led the foreign direct investment program in Canada for the Swedish government. She earned a Bachelor of… Read more

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