Connect with us

Montana

Alberton's Montana River Guides a leader in river safety

Published

on

Alberton's Montana River Guides a leader in river safety



The Covid-induced tourism boom to Montana introduced a new audience to the Clark Fork River. For two summers, boats, tubers, kayakers, paddleboarders and river boarders had campgrounds and fishing access sites clogged.

That visitation surge has settled, but once tasted, more people are using the incredible water resources today, and who can blame them? 

Advertisement

Most water recreation can be done with common sense safety but whitewater rafting is best done with an experienced company unless the person behind the oars has been safety certified. That’s because it’s a far cry from rowing with your buddies from Forest Grove to the Big Eddy Fishing Access sites casting flies all afternoon. 

There are several rafting companies that specialize in whitewater rafting with experienced guides that will make an incredible memory for families with lots of fun, laughter and the stories they share. The shuttle back to your vehicle is happy rafters telling their favorite parts of the day.

“The Alberton Gorge is one of the most beautiful sections of river in Montana and during the summer it has incredible scenery and whitewater opportunities. It’s our specialty! But our scenic wildlife viewing floats on gentle water are becoming more popular. And these are the heart and soul of Montana River Guides,” said Mike Johnston who started the company in 1994. 

Montana River Guides has certified whitewater rescue instructors and they have been training search and rescue, fire departments, and rafting companies for many years from as far away as Costa Rica and India. They are affiliated with the Whitewater Rescue Institute and every guide is trained in swiftwater rescue. They are so secure that they are the Discovery Channel’s only choice for whitewater safety.

The foundation of the rafting company is family-oriented whitewater rafting and picturesque river floating.

Advertisement

“We’ve always been off the beaten path, a little bit, being in Alberton,” Johnston explained. “And the longer we’ve had our company, the more we appreciate that we are not near a national park as it’s not near as crowded. That we’re not in a part of Montana that gets overwhelmed with tourism.” 

However, the business has been growing steadily as more people move into Missoula and the Spokane and Coeur ‘d Alene areas as those are the repeat customers which are a huge chunk of revenue. 

“A lot of our customers are local people and families,” Johnston said. “And then their visiting friends and families come and try it out. They come back year after year. But we also have a lot of tourists who used to drive through the area but have realized there’s a lot of stuff to do here for all ages so it’s almost a destination.” 

Something Johnston shares that he’s noticed in his 30 years of taking people rafting is heartening. 

“Families today not only include kids and maybe grandparents, but more and more people ask about floating with their dogs. We accommodate it whenever we can. Of course, we can’t do it in big whitewater but on the scenic floats on the Blackfoot or other rivers we float, we have different sized life jackets designed especially for dogs and we’ve never had a bad experience.” 

Advertisement

Just to ensure that other rafters might not be dog-people, the requesting party must rent the entire boat, which happens anyway with so many friends and family members.

Johnston is a director of the Mineral County Chamber of Commerce as a personal supporter of local businesses but also to refer his visitors to other local establishments. Where to eat, spend the night, play pool, fill propane tanks, campgrounds that are nearby, etc. Float information and scheduling is done online at montanariverguides.com.



Source link

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Montana

Montana Supreme Court schedules oral arguments in youth climate case

Published

on

Montana Supreme Court schedules oral arguments in youth climate case


The Montana Supreme Court has scheduled oral arguments in the state’s appeal of the youth-led climate case Held versus Montana. On July 10 the court will hear from state officials and lawyers for the 16 youth plaintiffs who sued the state. They argue the state is failing to act on climate change.

A lower court ruled in favor of the young people last August, saying Montana’s constitutional right to a clean and healthful environment includes addressing climate change. The Supreme Court’s decision will be the final outcome of this case since it is predicated on the state constitution.

This decision will have implications both within Montana and the state’s Environmental Policy Act but also nationally as this is the first constitutional-climate litigation to have gone to trial in the U.S.

Similar youth-led cases are being pursued in other states and Montana’s ruling may contribute to the legal precedent for those cases.

Advertisement





Source link

Continue Reading

Montana

Montana Town Named One Of The Most Dangerous In U.S.

Published

on

Montana Town Named One Of The Most Dangerous In U.S.


Let’s be honest, when most people think about Montana, they think of mountains, lakes, and National Parks. I mean, it’s called The Last Best Place for a reason, right? While Montana has all of that and more, according to some recent data, we also have some serious crime across the state.

Over the years, Montana has become a hub for illegal activity, especially when it comes to drugs. No, I’m not talking about our friendly hippies baking “special brownies”, we’re talking about the hard stuff.

A recent national article talked about how Montana has become a destination for fentanyl and how drug dealers are making millions of dollars by selling these illegal drugs at a premium price and killing Montanans in the process.

It shouldn’t come as a surprise that Montana has a crime problem, and according to data, a lot of that is happening in one Montana city.

Advertisement

Which Montana city is one of “the most dangerous” in America?

The website Neighborhood Scout searches cities and towns across the nation and grades them according to their safety and one Montana town didn’t get a very good report card.

Credit: Canva
Credit: Canva

The state’s biggest city is also the most dangerous. That makes sense based on population, but according to the facts and figures, it’s a little more alarming than that. As far as the crime index (100 being the safest) Billings scored a 2. What does that mean? Well, according to the website, that means that Billings, Montana is safer than 2 percent of U.S. Cities.

Credit: Canva
Credit: Canva

This makes the crime rate in Billings one of the highest in America. In fact, according to the data the average person has a 1 in 19 chance of being a victim of either a violent or property crime.

The good news? There are several neighborhoods in Billings considered safe. Here’s a look at the Top 5 according to Neighborhood Scout:

  • West Shiloh
  • Lockwood East
  • Baseline/Hesper
  • Broadview/Acton
  • Blue Creek

It’s good information to know, especially if you’re thinking of moving to the state’s largest city. Either way, be safe.

The 7 Most Dangerous Towns In Montana

Based on information from the Federal Bureau of Investigation, these are the most dangerous towns in Montana according to population and the number of violent and property crimes.

Advertisement

Gallery Credit: Derek Wolf

Montana’s 7 Poorest Cities Ranked

For many Montanans, it’s a struggle to make ends meet. With the high cost of housing, several locals have found themselves between a rock and a hard place when it comes to just getting by. Throw in the fact that prices are on the rise in almost every aspect of our lives and it’s not too hard to see why so many Montanans are frustrated and are looking to leave The Treasure State.. Let’s take a look at the state’s 7 poorest cities according to Stacker.

Gallery Credit: Derek Wolf

The Most “Montana” Towns In Montana

If you’re looking for the best that Montana has to offer, you might want to start by asking a local and that is exactly what we did. We wanted to know which Montana towns were the most “Montana” and who better to ask than the folks who were born and raised in The Treasure State?

Gallery Credit: Derek Wolf

Advertisement

 

 





Source link

Continue Reading

Montana

Northwest Montana mountain snowpack rebounds in May

Published

on

Northwest Montana mountain snowpack rebounds in May


May 27—High-elevation snowpack in the Swan Range has remained near or above historical averages for most of May thanks to a series of cold storms that dumped snow and rain across the region.

The snow-water equivalent measurement registered at 39.1 inches for Noisy Basin on May 26, according to data collected at a SNOTEL weather station located at 6,040 feet. The median for that date is 31.6 inches. The snow-water equivalent is the amount of water held in the snowpack.

Likewise, about 83 inches of settled snowpack remains at Noisy Basin, considerably more than the median of 65.5 inches for May 26.

While a dry winter fueled by an El Nino weather pattern kept Northwest Montana’s mountain snowpack below average through the beginning of May, late-season snow storms have maintained and even added to the snow depth in some areas.

Advertisement

The Noisy Basin snowpack actually peaked for the season on May 9 at 108 inches. The peak depth normally occurs in mid April before completely melting out by late June.

It’s a similar situation for Northwest Montana’s other mountain ranges.

A weather station on Flattop Mountain in Glacier National Park showed a snow depth of 72 inches on May 26, slightly below the median of 80.5 inches. Snow depth at Stryker Basin in the Whitefish Range was 50 inches, while Big Mountain’s upper reaches still held 53 inches of snow.

Overall, the Flathead Basin snowpack was 85% of normal on May 26, and 79% in the Kootenai Basin.

In the valley, Kalispell has seen measurable precipitation on 15 days so far this month. Between May 22-25, about 1.13 inches of rain was measured at Glacier Park International Airport. Precipitation month-to-date for Kalispell is 1.89 inches, slightly higher than the average of 1.42.

Advertisement

The Flathead River at Columbia Falls crested at 8 feet during the recent rainy spell and was expected to rise to 10 feet by mid week. Flood stage is 13 feet.

Potent and potentially dangerous thunderstorms could affect the Flathead Valley on Tuesday. Heavy rainfall of half an inch in 30 minutes is possible. Urban areas could see ponding of water in poor drainage areas if they take a direct hit from a storm, according to the National Weather Service in Missoula.

Temperatures will run 5-10 degrees below normal, with overnight lows dipping into the 30s Wednesday night through Friday.

High pressure returns by the weekend with pleasant temperatures in the 70s.



Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Trending