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The 7 Most Blown-Off & Forgotten Traffic Laws in Boise

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The 7 Most Blown-Off & Forgotten Traffic Laws in Boise


Do you ever cringe when you think about what fresh hell could present itself on your drive home from work?

If you haven’t, consider yourself lucky. It’s a daily occurrence for us 😳 

If you’ve ever suffered through the agony of Treasure Valley traffic, you know our drivers are in a league of their own. From busting u-turns over medians to tailgating ambulances in a bogus attempt to jump traffic, more Boise locals are driving by their own road rules. And it’s not good. 

After all, why obey the entirety of the law when you can cherry-pick the aspects that are most convenient for you?

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Scroll on for a look at Boise’s most blown-off traffic laws. 

Boise’s 7 Most Blown-Off & Forgotten Traffic Laws

Gallery Credit: Ryan Valenzuela

So, what makes someone a good Boise driver?

We thought you’d never ask😉 As it turns out, it’s nothing extraordinary.

Better Boise drivers tend to give themselves a 20-minute cushion on their routes from point A to point B. Or, they avoid the chaos of Eagle Road that’s jammed five days a week all year long so they’re not speeding and weaving like @$$holes to get to a nail appointment.

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They might also skip the I84 a.m. traffic report because they know it’s been jammed between Ten Mile and Eagle for the last 10 years. In short, they’re paying attention, planning ahead, and driving by Boise’s rules, not their own.  

There’s no such thing as a perfect driver.

To be fair, even the most responsible Boise drivers experience an occasional faux pas behind the wheel. But what sets top-notch drivers apart from the speed-racers comes down to consideration. 

Before they’re even in drive, decent drivers are accounting for the never-ending convoys of school bus traffic on their route and the takes-forever-to-bang-a-left-turn and baby-on-board crowds.

They might be white-knuckling their way through it, but they exercise grace when they’re stuck behind seniors cruising 15-to-20 miles under the speed limit. They’re not perfect, they’re just decent humans inside and outside of their car. 

Since we’re on the subject, have you heard of Idaho’s speeding loophole? It’s another forgotten road rule that happens to be pretty nifty. Scroll on for a look.

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The Nifty Speeding Loophole More Idaho Drivers Should Use

Did you know Idaho residents can do 15 mph over the speed limit to pass a slow car on the highway? It’s true! But this handy loophole doesn’t give us a free pass to speed whenever we want.

Scroll on for the do’s and don’ts of Idaho’s passing loophole…

Gallery Credit: Ryan Antoinette Valenzuela

Horses Need Turn Signals: 7 of Idaho’s Strangest Traffic Laws

If you’re new to Idaho, welcome!

Before you buckle up and hit the road, make sure you’re aware of the Gem State’s strangest road rules! From school bus concerns to how to handle horses in traffic, scroll for a list of helpful things to know behind the wheel in Idaho.

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Gallery Credit: Ryan Valenzuela

🚨 Can You Get Arrested for Driving Shoeless in Idaho?

🚘BOISE, Idaho. Logic and about 20 years of experience behind the wheel tells us driving sans footwear is a pretty risky, even reckless idea. But does that mean it’s illegal?

Scroll on for a quick peek at Idaho’s stance on the issue!

Gallery Credit: Ryan Valenzuela

🚨 Can You Get Arrested for Driving Shoeless in Idaho?

🚘BOISE, Idaho. Logic and about 20 years of experience behind the wheel tells us driving sans footwear is a pretty risky, even reckless idea. But does that mean it’s illegal?

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Scroll on for a quick peek at Idaho’s stance on the issue!

Gallery Credit: Ryan Valenzuela





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Idaho

“Who writes this stuff?” That's the question about a political mailer critical of the Idaho GOP

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“Who writes this stuff?”  That's the question about a political mailer critical of the Idaho GOP


BOISE — Mailer critical of the GOP arrives in mailboxes very close to the March 2 caucus. The mailer is anonymous and Take Back Idaho suggests the Secretary of State should look into its legality. That office tells Idaho News 6 the mailer is legal primarily because the caucus a private not public event.

  • Mailer Idaho Bulletin is critical of the GOP and totally anonymous.
  • Such mailers would be improper if distributed within 30 days of a primary according to the Secretary of State.
  • Because the GOP is holding a privately funded caucus, that 30 day rule does not apply and there is no requirement for transparency.

(Verbatim of story that aired is below)

The Idaho Bulletin looks like a mini newspaper of stories critical of the current GOP.

And the group Take Back Idaho says it’s been getting the blame.

“I got that thing too. It doesn’t speak for me.” says Jim Jones with Take Back Idaho, “Take back Idaho got a lot of inquiries and it’s not us.”

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Take Back Idaho is a political group that has been trying to move Idaho politics more to the center.

But it is transparent on its website of who is involved.

Jones says the bulletin is not and that’s a problem.

“You know when you put an anonymous thing like that out it raises suspicion I think it’s not appropriate and I’d like to see the Secretary of State take a look at it and see who’s trying to influence policy. “ said Jones.

So, I went to the Secretary of State to ask him if this bulletin is illegal.

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“That kind of thing does have to have a disclaimer,” said Idaho Secretary of State Phil McGrane, “but only in a certain window leading up to an election. That’s 30 days before a primary and 60 days before a general election.”

Notice he didn’t say Caucus. Because that’s a private party event and focused only on the presidential race So, there’s no requirement of transparency.

“What can you -presume from someone who does something political and doesn’t put their name on it? Unfortunately we see a lot of efforts of people to do that or not intentionally, so I think it’s a fair question to be asking.” said McGrane.

However, we all go to the polls May 21 for the state primary and if the bulletin is still circulating then…

“It could be an issue.” said McGrane, “if we get an inquiry we’ll look into it but I can tell you at first blush it meets all the requirements as it stands right now.”

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Jones says legal or not, it’s concerning.

“It could b e someone we’ll meaning but it could be someone who’s trying to mislead folks.”





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Idaho House unanimously approves legalizing fentanyl test strips

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Idaho House unanimously approves legalizing fentanyl test strips


Idaho lawmakers are one step closer to legalizing fentanyl testing strips.

House members unanimously voted to exempt them under the state’s drug paraphernalia statue Wednesday.

Idaho is one of just a handful of states where it’s a criminal offense to simply possess them. Simple possession of testing supplies is currently considered a misdemeanor, while selling them is a felony.

In 2022, 188 people in Idaho died due to a fentanyl overdose, according to state health officials – roughly half of all overdose deaths recorded that year.

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“If we’re able to mitigate just one of those with this product and allowing it to get across the board, we’ve done our job here in this legislature,” said Rep. Marco Erickson (R-Idaho Falls), one of the bill’s co-sponsors.

“Fentanyl is turning up laced in all sorts of places that you wouldn’t expect,” said another co-sponsor, House Minority Leader Ilana Rubel (D-Boise)

“This is a cheap and easy way that people can make sure they’re not being poisoned by fentanyl inadvertently,” Rubel said.

The proposal still needs approval from the Senate and Gov. Brad Little to become law. If adopted, it would take effect July 1.

Copyright 2024 Boise State Public Radio

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Idaho Supreme Court sides with developer in Teton County case – East Idaho News

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Idaho Supreme Court sides with developer in Teton County case – East Idaho News


BOISE — The Idaho Supreme Court recently ruled on a dispute that has stretched over almost two decades.

In January, the Supreme Court heard the appeal of Teton Creek Resort, LLC, of Wyoming, and Teton County.

The case arises from a dispute regarding a condominium development and dates back to 1995. That’s when a lot in Driggs was approved for Planned Unit Development with up to 16 standalone condominiums.

In 1995, TCR’s lot owned by TCR, LLC, the developer of Teton Creek Resor, was approved for Planned Unit Development with 16 standalone condominiums. However, a dispute arose in 2020 when county officials refused to record the plat, claiming TCR hadn’t submitted necessary documents.

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A legal battle ensued, with TCR seeking relief through the courts.

TCR asked the courts to require the county to record the plat. Furthermore, it asked the court to declare the county had violated Idaho Code Title 55 Chapter 15 (the Idaho Condominium Property Act).”

The court upheld TCR’s complaint, declaring the county’s refusal to record the condominium plat a violation of the Idaho Condominium Property Act. The commissioners “didn’t have a valid reason” for doing so, the justices said.

Breach of contract

Although TCR filed this suit in 2020, litigation surrounding the development of the Teton Creek Resort area began when local environmental groups apparently tried to stop the development of the resort by bringing a lawsuit against it.

The Teton County Board of County Commissioners, the Ad Hoc Committee Against Teton Creek Resort, Citizens For Teton Valley, the Community Association for Responsible Planning and TCR reached a settlement agreement in 1996.

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In the settlement, the parties agreed to never “raise any claim or objection of any manner whatsoever to the sale, development, zoning, land use plan or any other matter in any way arising from development or attempts to sell and develop the Teton Creek Resort Project,” according to court filings.

In its lawsuit, TCR claimed Teton County had breached the 1996 settlement agreement by refusing to record the plat, effectively blocking the project from moving forward.

The county filed its own motion for summary judgment in response, asking for TCR’s claims for breach of contract to be dismissed.

The court concluded that genuine issues remained in regard to the question of a breach of contract. The case was remanded for further proceedings.

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