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Coroner identifies Idaho Falls man killed in crash last month – East Idaho News

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Coroner identifies Idaho Falls man killed in crash last month – East Idaho News


EMMETT — An Idaho Falls man who died in a single-vehicle crash last month has been identified by a local coroner’s office.

In a news release from the Ada County Coroner’s Office on Wednesday, Coroner Richard Riffle identified the man as William Gutke, 41, of Idaho Falls. 

Idaho State Police had sent out a news release on Wednesday updating that the man had died. ISP told EastIdahoNews.com he died in the crash over a month ago. 

He was pronounced dead on April 12 after lifesaving measures were unsuccessful at Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Boise. He died from traumatic blunt force injuries from the accident, the news release from the coroner’s office said. 

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RELATED | Idaho Falls man dies following crash in Emmett

Background

The crash happened on April 10 at around 10 p.m. in Emmett at the intersection of East 12th Street and South Substation Road, according to Idaho State Police. 

The road was closed due to road construction at the intersection on Substation Road and Idaho Highway 16.

A Subaru Legacy, driven by Gutke, bypassed the road closure signs posted at the intersection of Idaho Highway 16 and South Substation Road, ISP said. Gutke continued north on Substation Road where the vehicle crashed into a large pile of dirt at the intersection of Substation Road and East 12th Street, where the vehicle came to a rest on the driver’s side. 

Gutke was transported by air ambulance to a hospital. ISP reported he was not wearing a seatbelt.

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The investigation is being conducted by Idaho State Police and the Gem County Sheriff’s Office.

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Eastern Idaho State Fair announces 4-H/FFA 2024 scholarship winners – East Idaho News

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Eastern Idaho State Fair announces 4-H/FFA 2024 scholarship winners – East Idaho News


Four winners of the Eastern Idaho State Fair’s scholarships pose together. For the eighteenth year in a row, the fair is handing out scholarships to local seniors who have participated in 4-H or FFA. | Courtesy Eastern Idaho State Fair

The following is a press release from the Eastern Idaho State Fair.

BLACKFOOT — The Eastern Idaho State Fair continues to support outstanding high school seniors in Southeastern Idaho. In partnership with Butler Amusement, Inc., the Eastern Idaho State Fair announced six scholarship winners, each of whom has been awarded a $1,000 scholarship to the college of their choice. Since its inception eighteen years ago, this scholarship fund has awarded over $112,000.00 to deserving college-bound teens.

The scholarship committee faced the challenge of selecting winners from a pool of commendable applicants; a testament to the exceptional quality of our youth and the 4-H and Future Farmers of America (FFA) programs in Southeastern Idaho that nurture their talents. Each application was meticulously reviewed.

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“Reviewing the outstanding scholarship applications gets more difficult each year; our youth are amazing, and the 4-H and FFA programs in Southeastern Idaho cultivate the best,” said Eastern Idaho State Fair Board Chairman Corey Foster.

The six finalists were selected based on past years’ experience in FFA or 4-H and their personal and professional goals, honors, activities, community service and financial need. The winners are:

  • Hope Wanstrom, Bingham County, Firth High School
  • Jamie Sherman, Madison County, Madison High School
  • Lucy Barney, Jefferson County, Rigby High School
  • Cooper Hatch, Bingham County, Blackfoot High School
  • Hadley Ashby, Franklin County, West Side High School
  • Hadley MacConnell, Butte County, Idaho Virtual Academy

The six scholarship winners and their families were invited to attend a special dinner in their honor with the Eastern Idaho State Fair Board of Directors and staff on Thursday, April 25.

The 2025 Scholarship is open to all graduating seniors from the 16 surrounding counties. We encourage all those interested to apply. Applications will be available at www.funatthefair.com beginning on January 1, 2025.

The Eastern Idaho State Fair is a 16-county fair district. The fair celebrates 122 years as Eastern Idaho’s longest running and largest community event, with nearly 255,000 attendees each year. The mission of the Eastern Idaho State Fair is to provide wholesome, affordable family education and entertainment in a clean and safe agricultural environment. It is never too early to get excited for the 2024 Fair, August 30 – September 7, 2024!

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Turkey hunter attacked by female moose with calves near Blackfoot

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Turkey hunter attacked by female moose with calves near Blackfoot


Late afternoon on Friday, May 24, a turkey hunter was attacked by a female moose on a section of Bureau of Land Management land bordering the Snake River downstream of Wadsworth Island, a few miles south of Blackfoot city limits. 

The individual was hunting turkeys when he inadvertently startled a female moose with her twin calves.  The moose began to charge, and though he fired two warning shots at the ground in front of her, she was not deterred.  As the moose knocked him to the ground, he was able to fire a third shot which made contact with the animal.  The moose ran off, and the hunter was able to leave the area safely.  He reported to Idaho Fish and Game that he is “bruised up” and will seek medical attention if his injuries appear to be more serious.

As he left the area, the individual noted that at one point he could see the injured moose a few hundred yards away, bedded down.  She stood up and began grazing while her calves nursed. The full extent of her injuries is not known at this time.

Idaho Fish and Game will be placing signs near boat ramps on the river in the vicinity of the encounter, cautioning the public to be aware of a moose with calves and to maintain a safe distance if the animals are spotted.   

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Though conflicts with moose are usually rare, moose can be defensive and dangerous if startled.  This is particularly true during the fall when bulls are rutting and in the spring when females have calves.

This encounter serves as an important reminder to all outdoor enthusiasts to be aware of your surroundings, especially when recreating in thick vegetation or near rushing water where moose and their young can be harder to see and hear.

What to do if you encounter a moose?

  • Keep your distance, at least three car lengths between you and the animal.  Never approach a moose, especially a female with her young.
  • If recreating with dogs, maintain control of your pets with leashes and don’t allow them to chase moose or other wildlife. 
  • A moose will often bluff by pawing the ground and licking its lips.  If it lowers its ears, a charge is likely forthcoming!
  • If a moose charges, run.  Try to keep a tree or other object between you and the moose, or climb a tree if necessary.
  • If you have bear spray, use it!  Bear spray can be purchased online or at most sporting goods stores.  It is important to keep it readily accessible on your body.
  • If you find yourself on the ground, curl in a ball and do your best to protect your face and head.  Try not to make noise.  Moose charge because they perceive you as a threat.  If you are curled up on the ground quietly, you will likely appear less threatening.

If you have any questions about recreating around wildlife or if you have a wildlife encounter to report, call your nearest Fish and Game regional office. In the Southeast Region, contact Fish and Game in Pocatello at 208-232-4703. 



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Idaho Falls veteran fears losing home, asks for compassion – Local News 8

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Idaho Falls veteran fears losing home, asks for compassion – Local News 8


IDAHO FALLS (KIFI) – An elderly veteran in danger of losing his house is asking for compassion as Memorial Day approaches.

There’s an idyllic neighborhood called Gem Lake Harbor on the south side of Idaho Falls. It has waterfront views, plenty of birds, and Bob Reinisch.

Reinisch spent seven years in the U.S. Navy as an officer aboard a nuclear submarine. He moved to the Gem State after working in a naval yard for 30 years. Now he’s a bugler.

“We provide full military honors for veterans’ funerals,” he said. “I even did two today.”

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Reinisch is heavily involved in Idaho’s veteran community, founding non-profits and leading others. He’s lived in Gem Lake Harbor for over 23 years.

“Wouldn’t give it up for the world,” he asserted. “But I may have to.”

When Reinisch purchased his lot and built his house, he was told his homeowner’s association wouldn’t start up until the neighborhood’s second phase of construction began. That happened last year.

“Right off the bat, we get an [annual] homeowner’s fee of $500,” Reinisch said.

Reinisch provided Local News 8 with the minutes from his latest HOA meeting, dated May 18th. The HOA approved a special assessment of $3,000. The fee is due July 1st.

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“I’ve lived close to poverty level most of my adult life,” he said. “Fifty years. And we can’t afford that kind of assessment.”

“During that meeting, I got so upset that I started having chest pains,” he continued.

Those chest pains were so severe that Reinisch was about to call an ambulance when they finally subsided. But in a sense, he was lucky.

“One of the homeowners that sat next to me – he went home and died,” Reinisch said.

“I made a proposal to ‘em to exempt veterans over 70 years of age,” he continued.

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However, the HOA’s lawyer, Mark Fuller, claimed that clashes with its covenant.

“The CCRs do not allow for any assessment exemptions for homes owned by older members or veterans,” Fuller said in an email Reinisch provided to Local News 8. “Special treatment would be unfair to younger members, those physically prohibited from military service such as non-citizens, etc.”

“But he’s a lawyer – what do you expect?” Reinisch said with a laugh.

“What he failed to include is that there are provisions within the covenants to do it anyhow,” he continued. “It’s called an ‘amendment to the covenants’ – which requires a two-thirds majority vote, but it can be done.”

Local News 8 asked Reinisch how he felt about the current situation.

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“Heartbroken,” he admitted.

“I’ve done over 2,000 veterans’ funerals, and it’s a true blessing for me,” he continued. “I’d have to give that up and move to somewhere else.”

“I love this house!” Reinisch added. “I want to stay here. I’m 80 years old. I want to die here.”

Local News 8 reached out to the homeowner’s association for comment, but did not receive a reply.

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