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Gavin Newsom's anti-gun constitutional amendment fails to gain support from a single state after 1 year

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Gov. Gavin Newsom’s, D-Calif., proposal to restrict gun rights through a 28th amendment to the U.S. Constitution has failed to gain national traction since it was unveiled one year ago.

Despite the Democratic governor’s enthusiasm in 2023, exactly zero states have agreed to his call for the constitutional convention necessary to amend the U.S. Constitution. 

Newsom claimed Sunday that this lack of progress was expected and the amendment could take decades to gain momentum. 

“Come on, no one was naive about this,” Newsom said in an interview with the Los Angeles Times. “This has been done before, but not recently. It will have its fits and starts. It will have its champions and will have its setbacks.”

Zero states have agreed to a convention of states to take up the amendment proposal. (iStock)

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NRA RESPONDS TO NEWSOM’S CALLS FOR A 28TH AMENDMENT: ‘CALIFORNIA IS A BEACON FOR VIOLENCE’

The L.A. Times noted that Newsom’s office claimed to have reached out to several Republican and Democrat state legislatures to try and encourage a convention of states, but would not specify which ones. Despite the governor visiting and working with Idaho, Oregon and Washington on other issues in the last year, those states reported they hadn’t spoken with the governor on the gun amendment.

“No, I have not spoken to Gov. Newsom,” Idaho Democratic minority leader in the state senate Melissa Wintrow told the Times. “I’m not aware of if he’s been in communication with anybody. I have not.”

Wintrow added that red states with blue legislatures are unlikely to support the proposal anytime soon.

“There’s just no way the state is going to agree to that. It just isn’t going to happen. As I’ve described, the political climate here is such that it just wouldn’t even be on the table,” Wintrow said. “They would laugh.”

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Gavin Newsom

California Gov. Gavin Newsom first proposed the 28th Amendment in June 2023. (AP Photo/José Luis Villegas, File)

Fox News Digital reached out to Newsom’s office for a comment.

Newsom proposed his idea for the 28th Amendment in 2023 to combat gun violence.

“Our ability to make a more perfect union is literally written into the Constitution,” Newsom said during the 2023 announcement. “So today, I’m proposing the 28th Amendment to the United States Constitution to do just that. The 28th Amendment will enshrine in the Constitution commonsense gun safety measures that Democrats, Republicans, Independents, and gun owners overwhelmingly support — while leaving the Second Amendment unchanged and respecting America’s gun-owning tradition.”

MAJOR CALIFORNIA LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICIALS DECRY NEWSOM’S NEW GUN CONTROL LAWS AS POINTLESS, INEFFECTIVE

The proposal would raise the federal minimum age to purchase a firearm from 18 to 21; mandate universal background checks to purchase firearms; institute a waiting period for all gun purchases; and ban “assault weapons.” It would also affirm that Congress, states and local governments can enact additional gun control measures.

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California Gov. Gavin Newsom pauses during a news conference.

State legislatures throughout the country claimed that Newsom did not reach out to them for a convention of states. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

The Constitution can be amended by either Congress or a convention of states under Article V. Congress can pass a proposed amendment with a two-thirds vote in both the House and Senate, sending it to the states for ratification, which is how all previous 27 amendments have been accomplished. 

With virtually no chance that a constitutional amendment restricting gun rights will have enough support to pass through a narrowly divided Congress, Newsom is calling for an Article V convention of states to convene and draft his proposed amendment. Two-thirds of the state legislatures must pass a resolution calling for such a convention before it can convene to consider an amendment to the Constitution. 

If such a convention adopts a proposed amendment, it then heads back to the state legislatures for ratification. Three-fourths of the states must ratify a proposed amendment for it to be added to the Constitution

Fox News’ Chris Pandolfo contributed to this report.

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Nevada

The Nevada State Fair is Back

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The Nevada State Fair is Back


The Nevada State Fair had its opening day on Thursday, June 13th and will go through June 16th.

Throughout the time the fair is at Mills Park in Carson City it will be open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.

The event is free to the public and dogs are allowed as long as they are on a leash.

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You can also find free parking at Carson High School or in general public parking at the Mills Park parking lot.

The fair also has classic carnival rides, a variety of food vendors and many games to check out.

They say the Nevada State Fair is one of the oldest fairs in the nation and it has grown quite a bit, so much they’re almost outgrowing Mills Park. 

“For new things this year, we’ve got a lot of fun food vendors, frog on a stick, Koko Teriyaki is a big Reno favorite,” said Lindsey Pratt, the Director of Operations at the Nevada State Fair. “There are more rides they packed in here that ever before so it’s going to be a good year.”

They also see a lot of families come back every year, and for history’s sake we wanted to ask the why it’s called the State Fair.

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“It is recognized by Nevada as a state fair and it’s a private entity that works with the state in cooperation in using the state land,” explains Pratt.

Now that kids are out of school many of them say they’re coming to the fair to kick of their summer and hang out with their friends. 

Deanna Garza and Feather Fred enjoying the Carnival’s opening day.

“We’re really just looking forward to getting in the environment and having fun, we’re looking forward to the zipper though,” they said.

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New Mexico

Report shows New Mexico schools have chronic absentee problem

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Report shows New Mexico schools have chronic absentee problem


NEW MEXICO (KRQE) – When it comes to students showing up for school, New Mexico is getting a failing grade. “Attendance is important. In reality, I could have you here for eight hours and not get through all my questions,” said Rep. Brian Baca, a Republican representing Valencia County.

A new report shows the number of students chronically absent, meaning they missed more than 10% of school, more than doubled from 2019-2023, outpacing the national average. Data shows in 2023, 40% of New Mexico students were chronically absent which shakes out to 124,000 students. “I wasn’t surprised. because I have been hearing this from the people working in the schools. They’re very concerned,” said Ellen Bernstein, President of the Albuquerque Teachers Federation. Researchers said chronic absenteeism impacts a student’s learning and likelihood to graduate.

According to the report, district staff say illness, lack of interest, and parental decisions like vacations or letting students stay home are the top reasons why students skip school. The report also said the state’s chronic absenteeism is underreported noting some districts use electronic methods while others use the old-school paper method. It also noted that not all teachers take attendance every day.

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The report suggests that the New Mexico Public Education Department should publish rules on taking attendance and give guidelines on how to intervene. It also said legislators should amend the Attendance for Success Act, passed in 2019, to allow districts to require extra instructional time for excessively absent students. However, Bernstein noted that fixing issues outside the classroom to improve child welfare could lead to a more lasting solution.



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Oregon

‘They’re more intense’: Oregon firefighters gear up for active wildfire summer

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‘They’re more intense’: Oregon firefighters gear up for active wildfire summer


The City of Portland is less than a month away from restructuring, including combining the various bureaus under the Mayor’s office, ahead of a voter-approved city charter change set to go into effect in six months.

Read online: https://www.koin.com/local/multnomah-county/mayor-wheeler-announces-plans-to-control-all-portland-bureaus-ahead-of-city-government-change/



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