Connect with us

Colorado

With Buc-ee’s first Colorado location, “The Gateway to Northern Colorado” is redefined

Published

on

With Buc-ee’s first Colorado location, “The Gateway to Northern Colorado” is redefined


Colorado’s largest gas station, and one of the largest in North America, is now open. Buc-ee’s in Johnstown is the first of the brand’s several-to-come gas stations and stores in Colorado. The store opened to thousands of guests on Monday morning.

The store, which has more than 100 gas pumps and features more than 74,000 square feet of store floor, is expected to be the anchor of a major business boon in northern Colorado’s small town of Johnstown.

“It’s awesome,” said Johnstown Mayor Troy Mellon.

The store was constructed at an intersection that has historically been farming land. While the northwest corner has long featured a liquor store and smaller gas station, the remaining corners of the I-25 interchange have been farmland. Buc-ee’s arrival changes that, as now the town expects the remaining land at the interchange to be consumed by retail and housing developments.

Advertisement
Buc-ees Johnstown, Colorado Travel Center
Ricky Nguyen, left, and his wife Lisa fill up their gas tank at the newly opened Buc-ees Travel Center in Johnstown, Colorado on March 18, 2024.

RJ Sangosti/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty Images


“Buc-ee’s is that first catalyst that drives what happens at this intersection,” Mellon said.

“Being that anchor store, it is overpowering to know these businesses are going to help each other out,” said Josh Smith, director of operations for Buc-ee’s. “That just gets translated right into Johnstown and the surrounding communities.”

The land across I-25 from the Buc-ee’s location will soon feature a grocery store, Murdoch’s, Starbucks and other shopping and restaurant options. Nearby apartments and other homes are being constructed.

Advertisement

“This was farmland. We put in a development that spurs other development, and that is really good back to the community,” said Arch ‘Beaver’ Aplin, owner of Buc-ee’s.

buc-ees-development-5pkg-frame-1389.jpg
Buc-ee’s owner Arch ‘Beaver’ Aplin speaks outside of Colorado’s first Buc-ee’s in Colorado on Monday, March 18, 2024.

CBS


Aplin said it was important for his team to try and hire as many local people as possible to help staff the property.

“There are probably 250-plus employees, every one of them being paid a really good living wage. And that has a big impact on communities,” Aplin said.

Advertisement

The minimum wage at the Johnstown Buc-ee’s starts at more than $18 an hour.

Elected officials in Johnstown have long said the Buc-ee’s and other stores will help recreate what they call “The Gateway to Northern Colorado.”

buc-ees-development-5pkg-frame-355.jpg
Johnstown Mayor Troy Mellon

CBS


Mellon noted that hundreds of thousands of vehicles pass their interchange every week. And, with a location so central to Cheyenne, Wyoming, Northern Colorado and Denver, they expect it to be an economic powerhouse for decades to come.

Advertisement

“(Buc-ee’s employees) work locally. Their salaries go home and they spend locally,” Mellon said. “It’s money that comes off the river of I-25, so to speak, and it sticks here.”



Source link

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Colorado

SPILL THE TEA: Colorado Springs Fire Department to soon be able to perform transfusions in the field

Published

on

SPILL THE TEA: Colorado Springs Fire Department to soon be able to perform transfusions in the field


COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (KKTV) – Paramedics working for the Colorado Springs Fire Department will soon be carrying whole blood to perform blood transfusions where they’re so necessary: out in the field!

This is thanks to a new partnership with UCHealth.

“Hemorrhagic shock — bleeding to death — is the leading cause of death for people age 45 and under, and we know that upward of 40% of these patients could survive with immediate blood transfusion in the field,” says Dr. Matt Angelidis, CSFD’s co-chief medical director and an emergency medicine physician at UCHealth. “First responders bringing blood to the scene of an injury will save lives.”

The program is the first of its kind in the state of Colorado and is expected to roll out in May. Watch the video above for more details!

Advertisement

This news comes to you from the Southern Colorado Business Forum & Digest, a Business & Economic Development publication of Colorado Media Group. Send your news to editor@coloradomediagroup.com. Plus a link to subscribe: Click here to subscribe to SCBFD.



Source link

Continue Reading

Colorado

Colorado Springs fitness centers now adding more pickleball courts due to high demand

Published

on

Colorado Springs fitness centers now adding more pickleball courts due to high demand


COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (KKTV) – Due to the high demand, local fitness centers are now adding more pickleball courts during April’s National Pickleball Month.

11 News spoke with Life Time in Briargate, who in just a few days, will be doubling their pickleball courts from 4 to 8. According to Sports & Fitness Industry Association, for the third year in a row, pickleball is the fastest-growing sport in America, growing over 223% in three years.

“A couple years back when we had COVID, people were looking for something to do, kill some time, you’re at least 7 feet away from one kitchen to the other, and you can play indoors. This rapid expansion, we’ve needed more courts,” said Life Time Pickleball Pro Mike McGregor. “If laughing and having fun counts for being healthy, then this is a great sport to play.”

Pickleball is a combination of a variety of different racket sports, including racket ball, ping pong, tennis and badminton, but is played on a smaller scale with quicker rallies. Last year, the Association of Pickleball Professionals found that nearly 50 million adult Americans – nearly 19% of the total adult population – had played pickleball in the past year.

Advertisement

“We always recommend a dynamic warmup. It’s an athletic sport, it’s legs dominant, so to avoid any injuries, we want to warm up the legs, get going, good footwear, eye protection, hydration,” said McGregor. “Because it is a lot of moving and kind of stepping and changing directions and things, you need to be a bit of an athlete so at each level of development, your coordination, your balance, eye-hand reflexes, all those things come into play.”

While pickleball reportedly started as 55+ sport, Life Time in Colorado Springs is seeing kids as young as 5, and adults up to 95-years-old playing, calling it an intergenerational sport, where grandparents can play their grandkids.

“Whether or not you know the rules, somebody is there kind of helping you, guiding you through your initial experiences and then fun thing is it’s easy to learn, but hard to master. So, you can get going right away, have a lot of fun and just keep challenging yourself and growing the sport,” said McGregor.



Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Colorado

Long-awaited property tax relief bill drops at Colorado Capitol in the final days of the legislative session

Published

on

Long-awaited property tax relief bill drops at Colorado Capitol in the final days of the legislative session


State lawmakers will take up an 83-page property tax relief bill with just two weeks left in the legislative session.

The bill comes after four months of hearings by a bipartisan Commission on Property Tax, which was created by the legislature and charged with crafting long-term relief for homeowners while protecting services for local governments.

“We got feedback from county commissioners, local elected officials, everyday citizens,” says Democratic State Sen. Chris Hansen, who chaired the commission and is the lead sponsor of the bill.

It would allow residents to exempt 10% of their home’s value — up to $75,000 — from taxation.

Advertisement

Hansen says that adds up to significant relief, “It equates to nearly $800 mission in additional tax relief.”

He says it’s the equivalent of lowering the state assessment rate to 6.35%. But critics say, if the rate was actually lowered, it couldn’t be raised without voter approval.

They say the bill allows lawmakers to adjust the tax relief at any time.

“The legislature is still playing games with this and this is why I think ultimately, we’re still going to have to go to the ballot to provide real property tax relief,” says Michael Fields with Advance Colorado.

The conservative group is pushing ballot measures to cut the residential assessment rate to near-2022 levels and then cap future revenue growth at 4% year over year while protecting education funding.

Advertisement

“If the state can backfill, then we think they should. Backfill any local districts that need to see that backfill,” says Fields. “Six hundred bills come up a year. They’re putting more and more money into things that aren’t local services.”

Fields says 39 other states already have property tax caps. But Hansen points to California as an example of why they’re a bad idea: “The commission put in a lot of hard work and we’ve come up with, I think, a much more balanced approach, and the commission voted almost unanimously to say ‘no’ to hard caps.”

The bill would also protect education funding while partially backfilling special districts like fire and ambulance. Local governments would also receive some backfill but only for three years. The money would come from the state education fund, state reserve, general fund and TABOR — or Taxpayer Bill of Rights — surplus.

The bill doesn’t specify how much of the backfill will come from TABOR refunds, but that could be a sticking point.

The measure also allows homeowners to defer any growth in their property taxes until they sell their homes and lowers the commercial assessment rate to 25.5% over five years.

Advertisement



Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Trending