Connect with us

Colorado

Colorado Moves to Connect Agricultural Workers With Mental Health Resources

Published

on

Colorado Moves to Connect Agricultural Workers With Mental Health Resources


The stresses of working in Colorado’s agricultural sector are amplified for migrant workers

If you or someone you know may be experiencing a mental health crisis, contact the 988 Suicide & Crisis Lifeline by dialing or texting “988.” Spanish-language services are also available.

Colorado lawmakers have proposed a pair of measures they say will improve the availability of mental health resources for the state’s agricultural industry, as stress, anxiety, and depression among ranchers and farmhands have emerged as critical issues that have worsened since the coronavirus pandemic.

The bills under consideration would address a growing need to treat rural mental health issues that have only compounded with the effects of the pandemic and climate change — all in a state that has one of the highest suicide rates in the nation. Mental health professionals are scarce in rural parts of Colorado, a significant gap considering suicide rates have been higher in rural America than in metropolitan areas for decades.

Advertisement

The first bill would create an agricultural and rural community behavioral health liaison position; that person would connect various state agencies with mental health care providers, nonprofits, and community leaders. The second bill is designed shore up and publicize suicide prevention resources for agricultural workers.

“If you’re two hours away from a health professional, and maybe in the winter in a snowstorm it’s a four- or five-hour drive, you’re just not going to seek or get the help that you want and need,” said state Sen. Perry Will, a Republican sponsoring the liaison bill. “Anything we can do to increase access to behavioral health care in rural Colorado and in rural communities is a benefit.”

The stresses of working in Colorado’s agricultural sector are amplified for migrant workers who face language barriers or cultural stigmas. The 2017 Census of Agriculture (updated 2022 data is scheduled to be released in mid-February) found about 8% of Colorado’s farms employ Hispanic or Spanish-speaking workers. In 2022, there were more than 19,000 farmworkers statewide.

“When we talk about emotional needs, they feel a void. They don’t know what to do because of this void they feel. But they feel that there’s something wrong,” said Ere Juarez, a regional director for the Project Protect Food Systems Workers who works closely with migrant families. “The loneliness, the sadness, the guilt, it’s high — super high.”

Migrant workers are routinely in Colorado for six to 10 months of the year to support relatives in their home countries. But they often face difficult conditions while in the U.S., Juarez said: working shifts of up to 16 hours a day, living with dozens of people inside small apartments, and having limited communication with family back home. In addition to the language barrier English presents, some workers don’t even speak Spanish, Juarez added, frustrating those who try to communicate in regional Spanish dialects.

Advertisement

Juarez said those feelings sometimes manifest as alcohol abuse or suicidal thoughts. Behavioral health resources to help workers need to be built up, she said.

“We all have food on our tables because they work for us,” Juarez said. “They are leaving their bodies in our fields in order to feed us.”

Then there is the drop in income when winter and year-round workers might clock in only 10 to 20 hours per week, said Hunter Knapp, development director for Project Protect Food Systems Workers. “Workers who stay here throughout the year face a lot of economic challenges and all the associated mental and behavioral health challenges that come with losing income and work.”

Iriana Medina, community engagement coordinator at the nonprofit La Plaza, has identified similar issues. Her organization works with migrant and immigrant communities in Mesa County on Colorado’s Western Slope, a region known for its juicy and sweet Palisade peaches and regional wine. “The diversity of having a person that has a different cultural and language background is a bridge that needs to be built,” Medina said. “Whatever these bills will take us to will actually be a piece of the puzzle” toward benefiting the Hispanic community, she added.

State Sen. Tom Sullivan, a Democrat and gun violence prevention advocate whose son, Alex, was murdered in the 2012 Aurora movie theater massacre, sponsored the bill to combat suicide. Sullivan said he is concerned that a person is more likely to take their life in a rural district than in an urban one.

Advertisement

“I’m just trying to acknowledge that there are people struggling in these communities and let them know that there’s somebody out there who will actually listen and understand their problems when they call,” Sullivan said.

KFF Health News ethnic media editor Paula Andalo contributed to this story.

If you or someone you know may be experiencing a mental health crisis, contact the 988 Suicide & Crisis Lifeline by dialing or texting “988.” Spanish-language services are also available.

KFF Health News is a national newsroom that produces in-depth journalism about health issues and is one of the core operating programs at KFF—an independent source of health policy research, polling, and journalism. Learn more about KFF.

Subscribe to KFF Health News’ free Morning Briefing.

Advertisement



Source link

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Colorado

Prosvetov Earns Second-Consecutive Shutout as Colorado Wins Fifth Straight | Colorado Eagles

Published

on

Prosvetov Earns Second-Consecutive Shutout as Colorado Wins Fifth Straight | Colorado Eagles


Feb 24, 2024

LOVELAND, CO. – Eagles goaltender Ivan Prosvetov stopped all 27 shots he faced to post his second-consecutive shutout, as Colorado defeated the Henderson Silver Knights 2-0 on Saturday. The victory now gives the Eagles wins in five straight, as forward Matt Stienburg and defenseman Keaton Middleton provided the offense, with each finding the back of the net in the winning effort. Defenseman Brad Hunt registered a multi-point performance with a pair of assists.

Colorado would produce the game’s first goal for a fourth-straight contest, as Stienburg sliced through the slot before deflecting a shot from the point into the back of the net. The goal was Stienburg’s fifth of the season and gave the Eagles a 1-0 edge just 3:11 into the game.

Both teams would go 0-for-1 on the power play in the opening 20 minutes, as Colorado would carry it’s 1-0 lead into the first intermission.

Advertisement

The Eagles would double their advantage when Middleton tracked down a loose puck between the circles and wired it home, putting Colorado on top 2-0 at the 5:21 mark of the second period.

Still leading 2-0 as the puck dropped on the third period, the Eagles would keep Henderson at bay in the final frame. Eventually the Silver Knights would pull goaltender Isaiah Saville in favor of the extra attacker, but would come no closer, as Colorado held on for the 2-0 win.

Saville suffered the loss in net allowing two goals on 30 shots. The Eagles finished the night going 0-for-3 on the power play and a perfect 4-for-4 on the penalty kill.

The Eagles will be back in action when they travel to take on the Abbotsford Canucks on Tuesday, February 27th at 8:00pm MT at Abbotsford Centre in Abbotsford, British Columbia.

Tickets for all regular season games are on sale now and start at just $23. You can find more information on ticket packages, theme nights, and promotional offers, by visiting ColoradoEagles.com or by calling the ticket department at (970) 686-7468.

Advertisement



Source link

Continue Reading

Colorado

The story behind the founding of Colorado College, 150 years ago | Cronin and Loevy

Published

on

The story behind the founding of Colorado College, 150 years ago | Cronin and Loevy


This spring marks the 150th anniversary of the founding of Colorado College in Colorado Springs in 1874. Few are aware that the initial motivation for the founding was to create a memorial to a 14-year-old girl who died of tuberculosis the previous year.

Here is an early account of the founding, written in the flowery and overstated writing style of the time:

“The first organized college in Colorado is the memorial of a beautiful American girl, who lost her life (and her) love of learning. She came as a young consumptive to (Colorado) Territory in the spring of 1873 and died the next autumn at the age of 14.”

Advertisement

“When visiting General (William J.) Palmer’s residence one day and looking at the eagles on the rocks and in the air, she suggested the founding of a school nearby.”

It would be a place “where youth inclined to pulmonary diseases might learn to soar, as light of heart and strong of wing as old Glen Eyrie’s king of birds, whose life among the cliffs and flight above the clouds symbolized her own aspiring hope and faith.”

The young girl was named Florence Haskell. Her family had moved to the cool air and high elevation of Colorado in hopes it might cure her lung ailment.

Soon after the death of Florence Haskell, her father, the Rev. Thomas Nelson Haskell, a Congregational minister and recently a professor at the University of Wisconsin, proposed to the Colorado Conference of the Congregational Church, meeting in Boulder, his daughter’s hopes of starting a college in Colorado.



Advertisement




Thomas Nelson Haskell

Thomas Nelson Haskell was the father of Florence Edwards Haskell. He was a Congregational minister and had also worked as a college professor at the University of Wisconsin.  






Haskell specified that the new college would be “open to both sexes and all races.”

At a subsequent meeting of the Conference, in Denver, on Jan. 20, 1874, the group gratefully accepted the offer from Palmer, of Colorado Springs, of 10 acres of land for the college campus, 70 acres of residential lots in the city that could be sold to raise money, and $10,000 cash to get the college started.







General William J. Palmer

Gen. William Jackson Palmer founded Colorado Springs in 1871. He attracted Colorado College by offering a free 10-acre site for the campus and a gift of $10,000 to get the college started.  

Advertisement






In addition, Palmer, a Quaker, had banned the sale of alcohol in his new city, and that made Colorado Springs appear particularly desirable to Rev. Haskell.

On Feb. 9, 1874, a certificate of incorporation for the new college was filed with the Territory of Colorado in Denver. On Feb. 17, the certificate of incorporation was filed in El Paso County, where Colorado Springs had been founded just three years earlier.

A Board of Trustees was appointed. The board was required to have “a majority of Christian men to keep the college evangelical, nonsectarian, and in sympathy with the progress of the age.”

The trustees met at once and named the school Colorado College. Thomas Nelson Haskell set to work soliciting funds and selecting a faculty. Under the direction of the Rev. Jonathan Edwards, the first classes were taught on May 6, 1874, in a building at the northwest corner of East Pikes Peak Avenue and North Tejon Street.

For years, that location was the site of the First National Bank building, then Chase Bank. Today, the offices of The Gazette are nearby.

Advertisement

The date of the first classes, May 6, 1874, has traditionally been recognized as the birthday of Colorado College.

The Gazette made this comment on the opening of Colorado College: “We have secured the location of the college here, and that will be no small aid to the growth of our town, if we go to work and make the best of it. The cooperation of our people is needed to give the enterprise a good start, and that cooperation should be given heartily and ungrudgingly.”

Typical of colleges at that time, Colorado College began with both preparatory and college-level classes. Due to the inadequacy of high school education in those days, many of the incoming students needed to take preparatory classes before they were ready for college level work.

The Gazette reported on May 9, 1874, that “the Preparatory Department of Colorado College was opened Wednesday last, and 20 students have already been enrolled. Most of these are from our town, but it has been signified that several more from other places, in this Territory, may shortly be expected.”

Faculty began to come on board. Professor E.N. Bartlett, formerly of Olivet College, in Olivet, Mich., was hired to teach Latin and Greek. Sanford C. Robinson, an Oberlin College graduate, was to assist in mathematics and physics.

Advertisement

Women served on the faculty from the start. Minna Knapp, of Germany, instructed in German and music. Mary MacKenzie and Emma Bump also were teaching.

By July 18, 1874, Edwards announced that student enrollments were going so well there were students from 10 states in addition to those from the Colorado Territory. Now, 150 years later, Colorado College regularly enrolls students from nearly every state and about two dozen other countries.

Thomas Nelson Haskell was the founder of Colorado College. At every point in the organizing process, he was the “lever” that kept the process going. It was Palmer’s gift of land and money, however, that brought Haskell’s new college to Colorado Springs.







Haskell gravesite

Florence Edwards Haskell was buried in Fairmount Cemetery in Denver. Her father, Thomas Nelson Haskell, and her mother are buried next to her in unmarked graves.

Advertisement






Haskell House, the campus house where students majoring in French live together, is named in honor of Haskell. It is located at the southwest corner of Uintah Street and North Cascade Avenue.

But the inspiration for Colorado College was Florence Haskell, the ailing 14-year-old girl who, in her last days, wished for a college at a healthful high elevation that would provide a place for students with lung diseases to study and learn.

Your morning rundown of the latest news from Colorado Springs and around the country

Success! Thank you for subscribing to our newsletter.



Source link

Continue Reading

Colorado

How to watch Colorado Buffaloes vs. Utah Utes: TV channel, NCAA Basketball live stream info, start time

Published

on

How to watch Colorado Buffaloes vs. Utah Utes: TV channel, NCAA Basketball live stream info, start time


Who’s Playing

Utah Utes @ Colorado Buffaloes

Current Records: Utah 16-10, Colorado 17-9

How To Watch

What to Know

We’ve got another exciting Pac-12 matchup on schedule as the Utah Utes and the Colorado Buffaloes are set to tip at 9:00 p.m. ET on February 24th at CU Events Center. Colorado is favored, but seeing as the odds didn’t stop Utah in their last game, maybe the team has another upset up their sleeve.

Utah can finally bid farewell to their three-game losing streak thanks to their game on Sunday. Not to be outdone by the Bruins, the Utes got past the Bruins on a last-second layup courtesy of Branden Carlson with but a second left in the second quarter.

Advertisement

Deivon Smith was the offensive standout of the match as he dropped a double-double on 17 points and ten assists. Carlson was another key contributor, scoring 17 points along with seven rebounds.

Meanwhile, it may have taken double overtime to finish the job, but Colorado ultimately got the result they hoped for on Saturday. They sure made it a nail-biter, but they managed to escape with a 92-89 win over the Trojans. Having forecasted a close victory for Colorado, the oddsmakers were right on the money.

Colorado can attribute much of their success to KJ Simpson, who shot 6-for-9 from long range and almost dropped a double-double on 30 points and nine rebounds. Simpson didn’t help Colorado’s cause all that much against the Bruins last Thursday but the same can’t be said for this game. Another player making a difference was Tristan da Silva, who scored 18 points along with eight rebounds and two steals.

The Utes’ win ended a six-game drought on the road and puts them at 16-10. As for the Buffaloes, their victory bumped their record up to 17-9.

Saturday’s game is one where the number of possessions is likely to be a big factor: Utah have been smashing the glass this season, having averaged 39.5 rebounds per game. However, it’s not like Colorado struggles in that department as they’ve been averaging 37.6 rebounds per game. Given these competing strengths, it’ll be interesting to see how their clash plays out.

Advertisement

Utah beat the Buffaloes 73-68 when the teams last played on February 3rd. The rematch might be a little tougher for Utah since the team won’t have the home-court advantage this time around. We’ll see if the change in venue makes a difference.

Odds

Colorado is a solid 6.5-point favorite against Utah, according to the latest college basketball odds.

The oddsmakers had a good feel for the line for this one, as the game opened with the Buffaloes as a 6-point favorite.

The over/under is 152 points.

See college basketball picks for every single game, including this one, from SportsLine’s advanced computer model. Get picks now.

Advertisement

Series History

Colorado has won 6 out of their last 10 games against Utah.

  • Feb 03, 2024 – Utah 73 vs. Colorado 68
  • Mar 04, 2023 – Colorado 69 vs. Utah 60
  • Feb 11, 2023 – Utah 73 vs. Colorado 62
  • Mar 05, 2022 – Colorado 84 vs. Utah 71
  • Feb 12, 2022 – Colorado 81 vs. Utah 76
  • Jan 30, 2021 – Utah 77 vs. Colorado 74
  • Jan 11, 2021 – Colorado 65 vs. Utah 58
  • Mar 07, 2020 – Utah 74 vs. Colorado 72
  • Jan 12, 2020 – Colorado 91 vs. Utah 52
  • Mar 02, 2019 – Colorado 71 vs. Utah 63





Source link

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending