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California beach camping banned thanks to excess of ‘human waste’

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California beach camping banned thanks to excess of ‘human waste’


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Overnight camping at a beach along California’s central coast is banned due to an excess of “human waste,” officials said this week.  

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The California Coastal Commission announced Thursday that overnight camping and campfires will be banned at San Carpoforo Beach for the next two years. 

Beachgoers walk along the shore as a campfire glows on the beach at San Carpoforo Creek on California Highway 1 near Ragged Point on Saturday, May 1, 2021, in Big Sur, CA.  (Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)

San Carpoforo, or “San Carpo,” is located off Highway 1 in northern San Luis Obispo County, about a four-hour drive south of San Francisco. It is the only free beach campsite in the Big Sur area – a fact not widely known until recently. 

MASSAGE PARLOR OWNER BUSTED AFTER ALLEGEDLY FORCING EMPLOYEE INTO ‘BIG’ AND ‘SMALL’ PROSTITUTION JOBS 

The Commission detailed the deteriorating quality of the beach in a staff report recently made available. The report noted that more visitors frequented the campsite once word spread it was free. A lack of resources for the U.S. Forest Services to monitor the site and a lack of trach cans, restrooms and fire rings have led to higher levels of trash and debris, the report said. 

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“The beach has no restrooms, very limited parking, no potable water, and no trash containers or collection,” the Commission wrote in the staff report.

The area is home to a number of endangered animals, such as the western snowy plover, which have been negatively impacted by the beach’s deteriorating conditions. 

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While the ban is in effect, the U.S. Forest Service will devise a plan to “reset” and figure out a way to allow camping in the future. Day use of the beach is still available for visitors.  



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California

California Tax-Sharing Transparency Bill Would Benefit Everyone

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California Tax-Sharing Transparency Bill Would Benefit Everyone


California residents should know how much of their tax dollars are going to big-box retailers, local businesses, and the consultants who broker revenue-sharing deals with cities. That’s why a bill moving through the state legislature is such welcome news.

The measure, A.B. 2854, focuses on the transparency of information that’s now accessible to the state, local districts, cities, and residents related to monies that are part of shared agreements between a few dozen California cities and either large retail chains or other businesses. The bill is now before the legislature’s Appropriations Committee.

These agreements send millions of dollars annually to some of the world’s largest retailers, including Apple Inc., Best Buy Co. Inc., and Walmart Inc. California cities would have to disclose how much sales tax revenue they give to the retailers, as well as how much the cities are receiving as a boon to themselves from these deals.

The funds used to broker these deals are considered public monies because, if they weren’t part of the deal, they could be used for public facilities, public roads, and so on. Local constituents and business owners are told where their taxes and the public funds are going. These transactions should be no different.

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The funds that these cities are distributing and receiving affect not only that specific city, but also the localities and their constituents around that city. Neighboring towns and their businesses should know how many dollars and what related agreement terms are involved so they too can decide how to incentivize their city with local and national retailers.

One potential argument against A.B. 2854 is that information on tax-sharing agreements should be withheld from all individuals and businesses due to growing tension and resentment by cities and businesses that aren’t part of these deals.

But those individuals, localities, and businesses already know these agreements exist and that cities and retailers are getting exorbitant amounts of monies handed to them for these deals.

Showing the true nature of these agreements won’t deter any existing tension and resentment. Instead, it would allow uninvolved businesses or cities to determine how to best use a similar agreement and relationship to benefit themselves as well.

It is unreasonable to assume that individuals and businesses would be willing to accept limitations on accessing data related to public funds—not when those limitations could hinder possible attempts to improve their state, their localities, and their livelihoods.

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These retailer tax-sharing agreements and their related data bring local windfalls by creating jobs and an influx of monies necessary to bettering the community and its individuals. Allowing the data from those agreement to become fully available and accessible is beneficial to all.

This article does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg Industry Group, Inc., the publisher of Bloomberg Law and Bloomberg Tax, or its owners.

Author Information

Lauren Suarez is an attorney at RJS Law with focus on federal and state tax controversy matters.

Allison Soares is a tax attorney at Vanst Law who focuses on audits, collections, appeals, international disclosures, and all other tax problems.

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California Forever promises to combine solar energy production with agriculture in Solano County

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California Forever promises to combine solar energy production with agriculture in Solano County


Group behind new city in Solano County promises to build large solar farm

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Group behind new city in Solano County promises to build large solar farm

01:52

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SOLANO COUNTY – The people behind the effort to build a new city in Solano County are also promising to build the biggest solar farm in the western United States in partnership with UC Davis. And this one would share space with livestock. 

The idea is for sheepherding and solar panels to share space in parts of Solano County. 

The agri-solar farm would be big enough to power 1.5 million households. 

Bronson Johnson is a sustainability engineer who works for California Forever, the company seeking to change zoning laws to build a new city and homes here.

“I’m 46,” Johnson said. “I’m a renter. Father of three.”

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Johnson knows California’s housing problem first-hand. He says prices have kept his family out of home ownership. 

“Yeah, still on the outside looking in,” Johnson said. 

California Forever released a statement about the agri-solar partnership with UC Davis. 

“We are excited about the opportunity to use agrivoltaics to combine solar energy production with agriculture and habitat restoration on the same parcels of land in a way that is both economically and environmentally sustainable, while preserving the character of the area,” Bronson said.

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California Forever


The solar panels would sit above the sheep grazing on it. 

“So the vision is how do we maintain the bucolic feel,” Johnson said.

Townhalls meant to create support for the California Forever plan have also revealed outrage. 

People have voiced concerns the plan will create too much traffic and alter their way of life. 

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California Forever has been gathering signatures to get a zoning change on the November ballot.

They’ll need to submit 13,000 verified signatures by early May.



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California prosecutors charge three Alameda police officers with involuntary manslaughter of detainee Mario Gonzalez in 2021

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California prosecutors charge three Alameda police officers with involuntary manslaughter of detainee Mario Gonzalez in 2021


The Alameda County District Attorney’s Office in California announced charges on Thursday against three City of Alameda police officers for involuntary manslaughter of detainee Mario Gonzalez.

On April 19, 2021, the officers tried to detain Gonzalez after receiving “a call involving a man behaving oddly in a public park”. They later learned he was a suspect in a shoplifting incident. Body-cam footage reviewed by JURIST shows the officers struggling to handcuff Gonzalez, forcing him to the ground and holding him there for minutes. Gonzalez then died at the scene.

An initial investigation did not find any police misconduct. The autopsy pointed to methamphetamine as the cause of death, with stress from the restraint, obesity and alcoholism as contributing factors. But the District Attorney’s Office reopened the case later, and a second autopsy pointed to asphyxiation from the restraint as the cause of death.

The District Attorney’s Office charged the officers with involuntary manslaughter under section 192(b) of the California Penal Code. That statute criminalizes “the unlawful killing of a human being without malice … in the commission of a lawful act which might product death, in an unlawful manner, or without due caution and circumspection.” That means the prosecutors need to prove that the officers were negligent in restraining Gonzalez and that the restraint caused his death.

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News reporters have compared the series of events to the death of George Floyd in 2020. In that case, a jury found former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin guilty of murder and manslaughter. California has previously sought to address police misconduct in Los Angeles and to better hold police officers accountable.



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