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Rudy Giuliani still hasn’t been served his Arizona indictment

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Rudy Giuliani still hasn’t been served his Arizona indictment


PHOENIX — Rudy Giuliani, a former U.S. attorney turned lawyer for Donald Trump, has not been served with notice of his indictment by an Arizona grand jury last month related to his alleged attempts to thwart the former president’s 2020 loss in the state, according to state prosecutors.

It’s not for a lack of trying.



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Arizona

Cali. passes law to allow Arizona doctors to perform abortions: Axios

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Cali. passes law to allow Arizona doctors to perform abortions: Axios


Not only does the law protect access to the procedure but it also permits licensed Arizona doctors to receive temporary medical credentials in California within five days of submitting necessary documentation to the medical boards.

  • Abortion rights activists hold signs as they protest outside of the Supreme Court during a rally, on March 26, 2024, in Washington. (AP)

The state of California’s Gov. Gavin Newsom passed a law on Thursday that allows Arizona doctors to legally provide abortions in California for Arizona patients having to travel out of state for care.

Not only does the law protect access to the procedure since Arizona has almost fully banned abortion, but it also permits licensed Arizona doctors to receive temporary medical credentials in California within five days of submitting the necessary documentation to the medical boards.

Nonprofit organizations like Essential Access and Red, Wine, and Blue will cover additional associated fees.

Newsom signed the bill, which goes into effect immediately and ends on November 30, with the California Legislative Women’s Caucus. Still, Arizona’s abortion ban has not taken effect yet as the Arizona Supreme Court agreed to Attorney General Kris Mayes’ request to delay enforcement of the ban until September 26.

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Axios revealed that the ban will likely never go into effect if the legislature postpones by June 28, because the repeal earlier this month will take effect 90 days after the end of the session.

Read next: Wyoming becomes first US state to ban abortion pills

Newsom’s office says this “provides a critical stopgap for Arizona patients and providers” if the ban does take effect.

Back to Roe v Wade

In response, CA Assemblyman James Gallagher who voted against the bill, took a jab at Newsom, saying it “is less about helping women than it is about Newsom’s shadow campaign for president.”

California and other “blue” states expanded abortion access protections after the Supreme Court’s 2022 decision that overturned the landmark Roe v. Wade.

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A recent analysis by The Guttmacher Institute shows that abortions done to patients traveling from other states more than doubled in California, going from 2,270 in 2020 to 5,160 in 2023. It added that 3% of California’s patients traveled from out of state in 2023.

Politico has previously reported that California has been struggling to build new clinics and train new providers, but the governor’s office says Arizona doctors being able to perform in California could help ease it. 

Twelve states have so far either greenlighted or are seeking to allow ballot questions for voters on abortion, including Florida, Maryland, Arkansas, Montana, and Nebraska – which all comes before the November presidential elections. 

Last month, in a video published on his social media platform, former president Donald Trump said he supported abortion for exceptions for rape, incest and to protect the life of the mother while reaffirming his support for the option of in-vitro fertilization. 

In a possible attempt to attract voters from both political parties for the presidential elections, Trump did not say that he would seek a national ban on abortion if he came back to the White House. 
 
Referencing his conservative picks for the US high court, Trump also said that responsibility for the 2022 Supreme Court decision halting a federal right to the procedure falls on him.
 
In his video, he said “My view is now that we have an abortion where everybody wanted it from a legal standpoint, the states will determine by vote or legislation or perhaps both,” adding, “And whatever they decide must be the law of the land. In this case, the law of the state.”

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Where abused children in Southern Arizona begin path to healing

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Where abused children in Southern Arizona begin path to healing


TUCSON, Ariz. (13 News) – It’s a grim reality, but children across southern Arizona are abused or neglected every day.

Just this month, 13 News reported on two separate cases in Tucson where children with disabilities died, allegedly at the hands of their caregivers.

One local organization’s mission is to get these children out of harm’s way before it’s too late.

When law enforcement or the Department of Child Safety believe a child may be experiencing abuse, they are brought to the Children’s Advocacy Center in Tucson. Here, a child can share their story, get medically evaluated, and begin a path to healing.

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Child abuse coverage

Pima County couple accused in death of special needs child

Police: Special needs boy dies from neglect in Tucson

“Every day we meet about six new children who need our help,” said Executive Director Marie Fordney.

Of the thousands of child abuse cases investigated in Pima County every year, the Children’s Advocacy Center deals with the most severe.

“People ask me how I can do this work because we are seeing the worst of the worst. It is truly awful the things that we see and hear,” Fordney said. “I leave this building full of hope every day because every child that came here is better off now.”

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Fordney said they work with children who have suffered either sexual or physical abuse and neglect. They also serve those who might be a potential victim of human trafficking, child porn, and more.

“Children are brought here if they are witnesses to a violent crime,” Fordney said. “We help children who have witnessed homicide or domestic violence just as much as we help children who have themselves been the victim.”

Fordney also says 35% of the children they serve have a disability.

“Children with disabilities may be less able to speak up or make a report when something is happening to them,” she said.

The center works with authorities at the onset of an investigation and helps collect evidence through a recorded forensic interview and medical exam.

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“We collect the evidence in a way that supports the healing for the child, and keeps it from being such a difficult situation for them,” Fordney said. “Before we had a Children’s Advocacy Center, a child might have been interviewed up to seven times and they would have had to get their medical services in an emergency room.”

Fordney showed 13 News the exam room they have on site.

“Not only is this space more comforting, but also the team providing the exams is really well trained and knows what they’re doing,” Fordney said showcasing the exam room.

Fordney said investigators will leave the center to make an arrest, but most of the time support can be put in place for the family.

“More frequently the kids are able to go back home because they have a supportive home environment, and it was a stranger, or it was somebody who lives in the home that has been kicked out of the home who was abusing them,” she said.

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She said a lot of these cases are reported to them by neighbors and community members who saw something that concerned them.

“Our children really rely on all of us to be watching for signs that they are in trouble and to make that call.”

To make a report, call 911 or call the Arizona Child Abuse Hotline at 1-888-SOS-CHILD.

For more information on resources provided at the Children’s Advocacy Center, visit their website.

Be sure to subscribe to the 13 News YouTube channel: www.youtube.com/@13newskold

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California lawmakers just stuck it to Arizona anti-abortion fanatics

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California lawmakers just stuck it to Arizona anti-abortion fanatics



Opinion: California lawmakers passed a law, signed by the governor, that allows Arizona doctors to perform abortions in California through Nov. 30.

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It shouldn’t be necessary, but it’s good news.

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California lawmakers are trying to protect the reproductive health of Arizona women in a way that the Republicans who control the Arizona Legislature are not.

California’s legislature passed a law, signed by Gov. Gavin Newsom, that allows licensed Arizona doctors to go to California to perform abortions. The law will expire on Nov. 30.

What that means, essentially, is that if the draconian 1864 abortion ban that was on the books in Arizona kicks in before the law repealing it takes effect, Arizona doctors and their patients would have an alternative.

California law is a ‘critical stopgap’ for Arizona

When the California option was first being discussed, Arizona Attorney General Kris Mayes posted support for the plan on social media, saying, “My office will continue to do everything we can to support our medical professionals as they work to provide care for their patients.”

It’s not ideal. But it’s something.

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Abortion ban judge: Makes a paltry appeal to keep his job

Newsom said, “I’m grateful for the California Legislative Women’s Caucus and all our partners for moving quickly to provide this backstop. California stands ready to protect reproductive freedom.”

The California governor’s office called the new law “a critical stopgap for Arizona patients and providers.”

At least concern for women crosses state lines

It’s a stopgap Arizona patients should not have needed.

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It’s a stopgap that Arizona lawmakers should have provided.

But it’s a stopgap that Arizona’s most virulent anti-abortion lawmakers and their supporters did not want.

Luckily, concern for women’s health is a doctrine that crosses state lines.

Reach Montini at ed.montini@arizonarepublic.com.

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