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Arizona Restaurant Week is back. These are the 16 best menus to try during the spring event

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Arizona Restaurant Week is back. These are the 16 best menus to try during the spring event


The spring edition of the bi-annual Arizona Restaurant Week dining event returns from May 17-26. It’s a great time to get out and try restaurants that have been on your list, as the participants are offering $33, $44 or $55 menus with either three or four courses and some even include a drink.

Participants range from casual neighborhood hangouts to luxe resort establishments, longtime destinations to buzzy newcomers, and all categories in between. With more than 160 restaurants, figuring out where to eat can be overwhelming. We scoured the Arizona Restaurant Week website, where new menus are added daily for the most exciting offers. These 16 menus caught our attention thanks to the number of options for each course, creativity of dishes, the value — or all of the above. Reservations are recommended for them all.

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Here’s a look at the most exciting menus to try during spring Arizona Restaurant Week 2024.

Kembara, JW Marriott Desert Ridge Resort & Spa

  • $55 per person
  • 3 courses
  • Dine-in only 

Chef Angelo Sosa’s menu is inspired by some of his favorite Asian street foods. The experience commences with the popular Tuna Thai Jewel with lemongrass-ginger broth, kiwi, jicama and Thai basil. A sampling of three dishes comprise the second course: chicken satay with lemongrass, ginger and cashew sauce; crab fried rice with oyster sauce, sugar snap peas and curry leaf; and the green papaya served with salted egg, tomato and charred beans with fish. Vietnamese coffee doughnuts with Lens Coffee and condensed milk on the side is dessert. 

Details: 5350 E. Marriott Drive Phoenix. 480-293-3936, kembaradesertridge.com.

Kaizen

  • $44 per person
  • 4 courses
  • Dine-in only

Start with shishito peppers tossed in miso caramel with bonito flakes or the miso soup shimeji with mushrooms, tofu, green onion and wakame with small sunomono salad. A Kaizen nigiri sampler with seared tuna, yellowtail with orange and shiso aguachile, salmon with apple mint chutney and inari with spicy tuna is the second course. For the entree, decide between anise ginger marinated slow braised short ribs served with house pickles, jicama slaw and two bao buns or Nanban tempura fish with ceviche sauce. End the night on a sweet note with yuzu white chocolate pot de creme green tea macarons.

Details: 515 E. Grant Street Phoenix. 602-432-0752, kaizenphx.com. 

Match Market & Bar, FOUND:RE Phoenix Hotel 

  • $55 per person dinner, 4 courses 
  • $20 per person lunch, 2 courses
  • Dine-in and takeout

Those who come in for dinner will choose two tapas from the following: patatas bravas; spicy crab salad; Iberico ham; blistered padron peppers; albondigas; and fried pearl onions with Calabrian chile oil. Next, go with the Russian potato salad with albacore and hard boiled egg or the pear and fennel salad with truffle pecorino and maple dressing. Four main course dishes vie for the spotlight: pan-seared cod; pollo asado; grilled hanger steak with patatas bravas; or orecchiette with Spanish chorizo, manchego and roasted tomato sauce. For the finale, decide between cajeta-filled churros with Mexican hot chocolate for dipping or orange cinnamon crema Catalana.

Swing by for lunch and start with the Russian potato salad, pear and fennel salad or Spanish style Caesar salad with Marcona almonds, crispy chickpeas and shaved manchego. Next, choose from four sandwiches that come with chips: grilled or fried chicken sandwich on ciabatta; grilled hanger steak on baguette; tuna on baguette; or grilled vegetables with romesco and goat cheese on ciabatta.

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Details: 1100 N. Central Ave., Phoenix. 602-875-8080, matchphx.com.

The Market by Jennifer’s

  • $44 per person
  • 3 courses 
  • Dine-in and takeout 

Kick off dinner with Chula Seafood jumbo shrimp with cauliflower puree and grilled corn, fried parmesan-crusted burrata with baby artichoke or cold asparagus soup with fried spinach chips. Next, choose among four entrees: pan seared Chula Aussie Ora King salmon in a shitaki mushroom broth with caramelized shallot compound butter on a bed of sticky rice; Sonoran Pasta Co. fusilli with spring peas, heirloom cherry tomatoes, squash and carrot ribbons and asparagus tips; chicken cacciatore on orzo or Meat by Lindz grilled hanger steak with chimichurri and Frites Street’s baton cut fries. Select one of two desserts from Tracy Dempsey Originals: a goat cheese panna cotta with rosemary infused strawberry compote or the chocolate-Italian sweet vermouth caramel tart with crushed pistachios and whipped crème.

Details: 3603 E. Indian School Road, Phoenix. 602-626-5050, themarketbyjennifers.com.

The Rosticceria

  • $33 per person
  • 4 courses
  • Dine-in only

Begin with a starter of zeppole and prosciutto or grilled baby artichokes. After a second course of an Italian wedge or Sicilian salad, entree choices are: a 10-layer lasagna with short rib ragu and béchamel; red wine-braised Italian short ribs served over creamy polenta; shrimp Parmigiano featuring herb and breadcrumb dusted jumbo prawns in a white wine and san marzano tomato herb sauce with mozzarella or porchetteria, featuring their signature pork rubbed with wild fennel pollen that’s cooked for six hours and served with baked Sicilian pasta and broccolini. Walk it all off with a trip to the build-your-own gelato milkshake bar for dessert. 

Details: 12811 N. Tatum Blvd., Phoenix. 480-916-0116, therosticceria.com.

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Arcadia Farms

  • $55 per person
  • 3 courses
  • Dine-in only

A dizzying array of 26 items offered over three courses means there’s something for everyone. Of the 10 starter options, the artisanal cheese plate with five French cheeses, fig jam and dried fruits; pate with cornichons, French mustard and toasts; and a bacon gruyere and leek tartlet with baby greens and tarragon dressing are attention grabbers. Of the seven main course options, chicken, wild mushroom and leek crepes with baby spinach, goat cheese and bechamel; beef bourguignon and a warm, layered grilled vegetable napoleon are worth strong consideration. Of the nine desserts, the carrot cake tuxedo cake with chocolate mousse filling, white chocolate buttercream and chocolate ganache, and their twist on a strawberry shortcake with a fresh strawberry scone, vanilla bean whipped cream and fresh strawberries, had our mouths watering. 

Details: 7025 E. First Ave., Scottsdale. 480-941-5665, arcadiafarmscafe.com. 

Familglia

  • $55 per person
  • 4 courses
  • Dine-in only

The restaurant helmed by sommelier Broc Chavez and executive chef Richard Rangel kicks things off with housemade focaccia with basil salt and Calabrian chile butter. For the second course, choose from grilled peach and housemade mozzarella, fritto misto with squid and shrimp or caesar salad. Main course options are: sausage and pepper gnocchi, pear and cheese-stuffed sacchetti, spaghetti primavera, chicken piccata or the acqua pazza’s market fish with fennel, baby tomatoes and crostini. The house cannolo is dessert. 

Details: 17025 N. Scottsdale Road, Scottsdale. 480-366-4021, famigliascottsdale.com.

Liz Modern Asian

  • Dine-in and takeout
  • $33 per person dinner
  • $44 per couple for dim sum lunch

For dinner, a smorgasbord of 10 courses await: Chinese chicken salad, dumplings, cheese puffs, pork bun, prime rib, Korean fried chicken, walnut shrimp, Hainan chicken and rice and brisket lo mein.

The dim sum experience includes dumplings, cheese puffs, spring roll, Chinese chicken salad and Korean fried chicken. Both menus end with cake. 

Details: 15323 N. Scottsdale Road, Scottsdale. 480-292-7689, lizmodernasianrestaurant.com

Taza Bistro & Bar

  • $55 per person
  • 3 courses 
  • Dine-in and takeout

Take an international culinary tour with globally-inspired plates. To start, choose the pear and brie salad with arugula and balsamic reduction, bacon-wrapped dates with spicy chutney or baked feta puttanesca and toasted sourdough. For the main course decide among: duck breast a l’orange with dauphinoise potatoes and grilled asparagus, zaatar herbed grilled lamb with tzatziki, herbed couscous and honey glazed carrots or wild caught pan seared sea bass in lemon caper butter and spaghetti cacio e pepe. For dessert, opt for New York-style cheesecake, mixed berry compote baklava or honey chocolate mousse. 

Details: 9619 N. Hayden Road, Scottsdale. 480-842-2275, tazabistro.com.

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Bar Cena

  • $55 per person
  • 3 courses
  • Dine-in only

Begin with marinated cucumber with whipped tofu, fresh herbs and chili crunch; frisee salad with endive, apple and Point Reyes bleu cheese in a roasted shallot vinaigrette; or mussels escabeche with pickled vegetables and grilled noble bread. Choose from three entree offerings: crispy skin chicken thigh with orzo, sundried tomato and feta; Sonoran Pasta Co. pappardelle with a wild mushroom bolognese; or seared ahi tuna in a green sauce with edamame and radish. For dessert, choose between the billionaire’s shortbread with caramel, ganache and a French sea salt finish or cheesecake with biscoff cookie crumb crust. 

Details: 14202 N. Scottsdale Road, Scottsdale. 480-597-6526, barcenascottsdale.com.

Liberty Market

  • $44/person
  • 3 courses, beverage included
  • Dine-in and takeout

This beloved downtown Gilbert restaurant impresses with the food it’s known for right off the bat with starter choices of boneless fried chicken with a cheddar-jalapeno biscuit or sweet sesame fried shrimp. For the main course, decide between beef stroganoff with wild mushrooms and spaetzle or seared pork belly accompanied by creamy polenta, grilled asparagus and a cherry red wine sauce. Key lime cheesecake or raspberry eclair will be dessert. Sip on a fountain drink, drip coffee or glass of red or rose wine, any one of which are included with your meal. 

Details: 230 N. Gilbert Road, Gilbert. 480-892-1900, libertymarket.com.

Terra Tempe Kitchen & Spirits, The Westin Tempe

  • $55 per person
  • 3 courses 
  • Dine-in only

The signature ground-floor restaurant at the Westin in downtown Tempe offers three starter options: halibut Peruvian ceviche; roasted baby carrots, squash, mushroom and cauliflower salad with brown butter brioche; cilantro-jalapeno hummus and roasted garlic oil; and mixed green salad with drunken goat cheese, mango and  pomegranate vinaigrette. There are four entree choices: ricotta gnocchi; pan seared halibut with zucchini puree and red quinoa in an aji-mango sauce; membrillo half chicken with Sonoran bacon-potato salad, quince glaze and salsa verde; and braised short rib with mesquite polenta fries, summer squash and pomegranate beef gravy. For the sweet ending, decide between Mexican Chocolate atole custard with dulce de leche caramel, chantilly and mini churro bites, or the orange creamsicle cheesecake made with Arizona citrus cremeux, blood orange gel and mandarin oranges. 

Details: 11 E. Seventh St., Tempe. 480-968-8885, terratempe.com.

Feringhee Modern Indian Cuisine

  • $55 per person
  • 3 courses
  • Dine-in and takeout

Khandari pork ribs, chicken tikka highway, samosa pinwheel chaat and a trio of puchka are among the eight starter choices. Saffron pulao rice, black dairy dal and garlic naan accompany each of the six main course options, which include: malai kofta; mushroom pepper fry; saag paneer; Old Delhi butter chicken; kashmiri mutton rogan josh and tandoori salmon. For dessert, decide among gulab jamun cheesecake, chocolate brownie with pistachio ice cream and saffron milk foam or Kulfi popsicle bar with candied rose petals.

Details: 3491 W. Frye Road, Chandler. 480-534-7178, feringhee.com.

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Tempo Urban Bistro

  • $55 per person
  • 3 courses
  • Dine-in and takeout

Choose from starters like lobster beignets, black bean duck spring roll or poached pear salad. Next, ponder four main selections: salmon wellington, pork osso buco, steak au poivre or Dungeness crab ravioli.  For dessert, a tough decision awaits between banana xango, lemon meringue pie and bourbon pecan pie. 

Details: 21067 W. Main St., Buckeye. 623-594-6788, tempourbanbistro.com.

Ajo Al’s Mexican Cafe

  • $55 per couple
  • 3 courses, beverage included 
  • Dine-in only

Share an order of chile con queso or guacamole to start, then each person gets their own entree of blanco enchiladas stuffed with mushrooms or spinach, shredded beef quesabirria tacos with consomme dipping sauce, a burrito bowl with chicken or steak or a crisp chicken burro topped with cream cheese and melted cheddar. For dessert, split the flan or key lime pie. Toast with a Mexican beer, house margarita or Mexican mule, any of which come with your meal. 

Details: 5101 N. 16th St., Phoenix. 602-222-9902. Other locations at ajoals.com.

Fabio on Fire

  • $44 per person
  • 3 courses
  • Dine-in and takeout

Begin with lightly breaded shrimp roasted in a wood-fired oven, wood-fired pork belly with rosemary focaccia and chickpea hummus or lightly fried short rib ravioli. Main course options are: white pizza adorned with imported bufala mozzarella, prosciutto di parma, arugula and shaved parmesan; lobster tortellini in a pink vodka cream sauce with crab; braised short rib ravioli in a buttercream sage sauce; or homemade tagliatelle with Bolognese sauce. One scoop of chef Fabio’s homemade gelato is dessert. 

Details: 8275 W. Lake Pleasant Pkwy., Peoria. 623-680-5385, fabioonfire.com.

The best places to dine in 2024: 100 essential restaurants in metro Phoenix

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Bear shot dead after attacking 15-year-old in Arizona cabin:

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Bear shot dead after attacking 15-year-old in Arizona cabin:


A black bear was shot and killed by Arizona fish and game officers after it entered a home through an open door and injured a teenager in a mountain community near the New Mexico state line, wildlife officials said.

The 15-year-old boy, identified as Brigham Hawkins by his family, received wounds to his face and arm when the bear swiped at him, and he was treated at a hospital after the late Wednesday incident in Alpine, the state Game and Fish Department said.

His mother, Carol Hawkins, told CBS affiliate KPHO-TV in Phoenix that the bear attacked her son while he was alone and watching television.

“Never in our wildest dreams did we think (a bear) would come in the home,” she told the station.

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Hawkins said her other son heard screams and went to help. Wildlife officials said the bear entered the home a second time before it fled.

“Not many kids can say they got in a fight with a bear and came out on top,” Hawkins said in a Facebook post that included a photo showing cuts on her son’s nose and arm. Hawkins did not respond to a Facebook message Saturday from The Associated Press.

Wildlife officers found and shot the bear, which the agency said was believed to be about 3 years old and would be tested for disease by department specialists.

“It was thanks to the quick reaction by his brother and his family that they were able to distract the bear from what very easily in a matter of seconds could have turned into a real tragedy there,” AZ Game and Fish Department Law Enforcement Supervisor Shawn Wagner told KPHO-TV.

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The teen was taken to a local hospital with injuries to his face and arm and has started the rabies vaccine as a precaution but is expected to recover.

“Everybody that came into help him, he had a big thank you and so he’s handling it well. And he’ll be okay,” Carol Hawkins told the station.

The attack was the 16th by bears on people in the state since wildlife officials began keeping records in 1990, including two that were fatal, the department said.

A 66-year-old man was killed almost a year ago when he was attacked at a campsite in the Groom Creek area south of Prescott and about 100 miles north of Phoenix.

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Arizona mother on a mission to prevent drownings after son's tragedy

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Arizona mother on a mission to prevent drownings after son's tragedy


An Arizona mother has a warning about drownings after her son survived one, but was never the same.

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Her nightmare started with a call that no parent ever wants.

“I got a phone call that something happened,” Lindsey Black said. “Something happened to one of my boys.”

Her son was nearing 2-years-old when he fell into a babysitter’s pool.

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Tune in to FOX 10 Phoenix for the latest news:

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“They don’t know how long he was under, but the blood toxicity said he was about 45 minutes without oxygen, and he was 30 minutes in cardiac arrest,” Black said.

The family was forever changed in an instant.

That was in 2006, but Santana lived for seven more years using a feeding tube and oxygen to sustain him.

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“My other two boys, they lost their mom at the same time for a while. I was devastated, but I took that, I took all of that and said ‘I need to give back for him,’” Black said.

Her mission is to save families from the same pain.

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“The only way to stop it is to get eyes on these kids. Get the barriers, then get the classes,” she said.

Those are options that could’ve saved her son’s life.

“I didn’t have those classes. There wasn’t a fully fenced pool at the property that it happened at,” she explained.

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It was a heartbreaking loss – both times.

“I’ve lost him twice. I’ve lost two different versions of my son, and I miss them both,” she said. “So much.”

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Click here for drowning prevention tips from the Drowning Prevention Coalition of Arizona



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Arizona dispatch: students from 70 law schools and universities debate 20 proposed amendments to the US Constitution at model convention

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Arizona dispatch: students from 70 law schools and universities debate 20 proposed amendments to the US Constitution at model convention


JP Leskovich is a rising 3L at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law and JURIST’s News Managing Editor. He filed this dispatch from Phoenix. This is the second in a series of dispatches he’s filing as an embedded reporter for JURIST at the Model Constitutional Convention sponsored by the Center for Constitutional Design at ASU Law.  

Student delegates at the Model Constitutional Convention being held at Arizona State University’s Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law this Memorial Day weekend debated 20 proposed amendments to the US Constitution in their sessions Saturday.

The proposals covered a range of topics, including environmental protection, national service, future constitutional amendments, court reform, impeachment, gun control, electoral campaign periods, term limits, lifting the cap on the number of representatives in the House of Representatives, the right to marry, limiting presidential pardon power, prohibiting political gerrymandering, instituting restorative justice, abolishing death-qualified juries, Congressional representation for the territories, codifying tribal sovereignty, restricting eminent domain, restricting investment for members of Congress, and prohibiting discrimination based on sex and gender.

Contrary to the first day of the Convention, where we deliberated in smaller committees, the whole Convention—all 110 of us serving as official delegates—debated these amendments in plenary sessions. This resulted in wide-ranging debates on these topics, with heated but constructive conversation about our constitutional future. We were governed by a modified Roberts Rules, which provided us with structure so we could get things done in the time allotted (granted, it did take us nearly 8 hours!).

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In addition to debating the proposals as written, we introduced and voted on a number of amendments to the proposals. This allowed the Convention to express its democratic will and change the proposals. For example, the Equal Rights Amendment was amended to include “sex, gender identity, and sexual orientation,” instead of just “sex.” There were a number of moments where we had to call “division,” which required the chair to count each of the votes. The fact that we need to call “division” so many times showed how contentious many of these amendments were and how difficult it can be to reach a consensus.

One of the first proposals that we discussed was one that would enshrine tribal sovereignty in the US Constitution. Tribal nations in the US are sovereigns, but their sovereignty is often infringed on. This proposal would codify the current status of Indian law in the US to protect tribal sovereignty from Supreme Courts that may not understand the intricacies of Indian law and therefore limit tribal sovereignty.

“Historically, the Supreme Court is not good at doing Indian law,” said Crispin South, a Choctaw law student at Arizona State University who represented Oklahoma and introduced the proposal. “I think Justice Brennan once called Indian law cases ‘chicken shit’ cases.” He pointed to Montana v. US and Oklahoma v. Castro-Huerta, saying that “those cases really for no reason abrogated the sovereignty of tribal nations with very feeble justification.” Therefore, he said, this proposed amendment is necessary to “right some precious wrongs and create a firewall for the current Indian law paradigm.”

During debate, delegates expressed support for recognizing tribal sovereignty and treating tribal nations as equals. As the delegate representing Wisconsin, I emphasized that there are 11 federally recognized tribes in the state and that constructive government-to-government relations are critical to ending the long chain of broken promises and broken treaties. South said he felt good about the debate:

I think it went well. The one bit of opposition we did get was requiring tribal nations to adopt the US Bill of Rights and I think Congress has really already done its job in enacting the Indian Civil Rights Act in that respect. So I don’t think it would be wise at this point to constitutionally require that the Bill of Rights be incorporated against tribes.

Another proposal that received considerable debate was giving the territories full voting rights in Congress. There seemed to be widespread support, with some delegates agitating to provide the territorial delegates to the Convention the ability to vote this weekend. Some expressed concerns about granting territories with small populations two Senators.

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I spoke with Rafael Montero, who was a delegate representing Colorado but is from Puerto Rico, about territorial representation and what it was like to hear people debate his own rights. “I felt the lack of information in regards to the territories and their political status, especially in regards to taxation and how taxation works in relation to how the government already has power over the territories.” He went on to say that, “on the other hand, there were people that I felt very grateful for and in solidarity with for supporting and advocating for those rights.” He emphasized that it’s important for territories to have voting representation in Congress because they are already being governed by the federal government and the President.

There were some more contentious amendments proposed, like one that would prohibit discrimination on the basis of sex and gender. Some more conservative delegates expressed concerns about codifying abortion rights and transgender rights. And some of the women delegates noted that it was mostly men expressing opposition. This was definitely the most tense and contentious debate, but it still remained mostly respectful and productive.

In my first dispatch for this Convention, I expressed optimism that we could be a beacon for a new and more just constitutional order. After a day of debate, I am still optimistic that young Americans can build a better democracy, but that optimism is much more tempered and cautious. The threshold is high, and it is hard to build a broad enough coalition in a nation so divided. We are voting today, so we shall see.

Still, the fact that so many US law students and undergraduates gathered to discuss our constitutional future shows that there is a critical mass of young people that are hungering for democracy to work better.

Opinions expressed in JURIST Dispatches are solely those of our correspondents in the field and do not necessarily reflect the views of JURIST’s editors, staff, donors or the University of Pittsburgh.

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