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Arizona men’s basketball vs. Colgate: Game time, TV schedule, odds, streaming and more

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Arizona men’s basketball vs. Colgate: Game time, TV schedule, odds, streaming and more


It’s Game Day!

The 2nd-ranked Arizona Wildcats are back in action after more than a week off, hosting the Colgate Raiders.

Here’s all the info you need to catch this game:

Arizona-Colgate game time, details:

  • Date: Saturday, Dec. 2, 2023
  • Time: 1 p.m. MT
  • Location: McKale Center; Tucson, Ariz.
  • Line: According to DraftKings SportsBook, Arizona is a 21-point favorite and the over/under is 149.5. KenPom.com gives the Wildcats a 97 percent chance of winning.

Which TV channel is Arizona-Colgate on?

Arizona-Colgate will be televised on the Pac-12 Network. Daron Sutton (play-by-play) and Don MacLean (analyst) will be calling the game.

How can I watch Arizona-Colgate online?

The stream of Arizona-Colgate can be viewed at Pac-12.com.

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How can I listen to Arizona-Colgate on the radio?

You can listen to Arizona-Colgate on the Arizona IMG Sports Network.

How can I follow Arizona-Colgate?

By following us on Twitter (X) at @AZDesertSwarm and our editor Brian Pedersen (@realBJP).

Odds/lines subject to change. T&Cs apply. See draftkings.com/sportsbook for details.

Arizona-Colgate pregame coverage:





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Arizona

Helios aims to accelerate progress in early literacy across Arizona

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Helios aims to accelerate progress in early literacy across Arizona


PHOENIX – March is National Reading Month, and this month KTAR’s community spotlight shines on Helios Education Foundation and its mission to accelerate progress in early literacy across Arizona.

Just 41% of third graders in Arizona are reading at grade level. The rate is even lower for Arizona students from low-income backgrounds (27%) and Latino students (30%). That’s according to the latest Arizona Education Progress Meter, which tracks key areas to improve Arizona’s education system.

“Reading is the foundational skill for all future learning,” Helios President and CEO Paul J. Luna told KTAR News 92.3 FM’s Arizona’s Morning News. “Students learn to read by third grade and then, following third grade, they read to learn. That’s why I think it’s foundationally important for our students to be able to really fully embrace the science of reading.”

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Luna added “research shows that students who are not proficient readers by the end of 3rd grade are more likely to fall behind in all subject areas. They’re also more likely to drop out of high school and not go on to college.”

Ensuring students can read proficiently by the end of third grade is a focus area for Helios Education Foundation.

Since 2006, Helios has invested nearly $350 million in education initiatives in Arizona and Florida, the two states it serves. Its mission is to improve education outcomes and increase postsecondary education attainment for all students, especially from low-income and underrepresented communities.

Luna noted there’s a statewide goal to get 72% of third graders reading proficiently by the year 2030. Progress toward reaching that goal was halted during the COVID-19 pandemic. In 2021, just 35% of third graders were reading proficiently, compared with 46% right before the pandemic began in 2019.

“We have seen reading scores rebound, but they’re still not where we’d like them to be,” Luna stressed.

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That is why Helios has partnered with organizations that are working to improve early literacy outcomes. This includes Read on Arizona, which is the state’s early literacy initiative that’s focused on Arizona children from birth to age 8.

Read on Arizona has identified chronic absenteeism, which is defined as students who miss 10% or more of the school year, as a barrier to reading proficiency. Last May, it formed a taskforce to develop recommendations and resources that’ll help prevent chronic absenteeism and reengage students who’ve missed too many school days.

In September, Helios teamed up with the Phoenix Final Four Local Organizing Committee to launch Read to the Final Four. It’s a reading competition that’s using the excitement surrounding the 2024 Men’s Final Four, which is taking place at State Farm Stadium in April, to inspire Arizona third graders to accelerate their reading skills.

Helios also supports Read Better Be Better, a local nonprofit that’s hoping to inspire a love of literacy and learning through a unique reading intervention program that matches kinder through third graders with middle, high school and college students. The program is now available in more than 100 schools across Maricopa County.

“Together with our partners, we are working to improve early literacy so that all children learn to read and can be successful in school and later in life,” Luna said.

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Blacklisting companies for their gun policies will backfire on Arizona

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Blacklisting companies for their gun policies will backfire on Arizona



Opinion: Arizona will pay more – in cash and reputation – if it begins cutting off businesses to make a political point about firearms.

The Arizona Legislature is considering a bill that could make our regulatory environment more cumbersome, complicated and expensive, tying up private businesses in red tape and sticking taxpayers with the bill.

If it passes, Arizona’s reputation as a business-friendly state will be at risk.

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The proponents of Senate Concurrent Resolution 1007 argue that private companies are discriminating against potential customers based on gun politics and thus shouldn’t be allowed to do business with the state and local governments.

They also believe that the best way to prevent such discrimination is to prohibit private entities from entering into certain contractual agreements, unless the entity’s contract includes written assurances that there will be no discrimination against any firearm entity or firearm trade association.

Blacklist policies have hurt other states

Private businesses of all sizes make tough decisions every day to manage risk, meet client needs and deliver returns for shareholders. All that’s hard enough to do without inserting a political agenda into the mix. 

However, the proposed remedy is far worse than the perceived problem.  

This bill is a bad deal for Arizona, replacing a market defined by supply and demand with one where politicians decide who can do business with whom.  

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Other states have adopted similar blacklist policies and paid a stiff price.  

In Texas, taxpayers have been forced to shoulder hundreds of millions of dollars in additional municipal borrowing costs after lawmakers there pushed out a handful of bond underwriters.

Local officials in Stillwater, Okla., had to put a series of infrastructure projects on hold after borrowing costs spiked because the lender found itself on that state’s blacklist.  

Fewer choices mean higher costs

It’s a predictable consequence.

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After all, fewer businesses eligible to contract with state and local governments leads to fewer choices from which the government can select for projects, which leads to higher costs for taxpayers. 

State and local governments can’t print money. When costs go up in one area, it means there are fewer resources to invest in things like public safety, sanitation and other core government responsibilities.

GOP bill lets you sue: Over imagined Marxist policies

It’s no wonder the Arizona Association of Counties has expressed concern that bringing a blacklist law to our state would cause small, rural communities to suffer due to reduced banking services and higher costs, which will ultimately affect local taxpayers.  

Arizona’s pro-business reputation has been cultivated in part by assuring job creators that our policymaking environment is predictable and stable, and that our laws and regulations are intended to encourage job growth, not stifle it.   

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Don’t put Arizona’s reputation at risk

But SCR 1007 signals that Arizona’s business environment can shift at any moment.

What was once an acceptable business practice could suddenly fall out of favor with whoever’s in power, jeopardizing a company’s ability to operate here.

Arizona has worked hard to cultivate a business environment where businesses can succeed or fail in a free market.

The policies proposed in SCR 1007 would make government the arbiter of who wins and who loses. Lawmakers should reject it.

Danny Seiden is president and CEO of the Arizona Chamber of Commerce & Industry. On X, formerly Twitter: @dbseiden.

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Arizona mother yelled 'I am going to kill you' as she drove through park hitting a child: police

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Arizona mother yelled 'I am going to kill you' as she drove through park hitting a child: police


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A Peoria, Arizona woman has been charged with attempted murder after allegedly driving through a park in her pickup truck and threatening to kill teenagers who were bullying her children, according to police.

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FOX 10 in Phoenix reported that 30-year-old Brandie Gotch hit one of the children and has been charged with several crimes including attempted murder and endangerment.

In court documents obtained by the station, police claim Gotch confronted a group of kids at Westgreen Park near 87th Avenue and Butler Drive after seeing them fighting with her children on Feb. 27, 2024.

During the altercation, Gotch reportedly chased one teen with a stick and grabbed another teen by the hair.

JILL BIDEN HECKLED MORE THAN ONCE AT ARIZONA CAMPAIGN STOP

Brandie Gotch was arrested after allegedly driving her truck through a park while chasing teenagers who were fighting with her children. (Maricopa County Sheriffs Office)

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She then got behind the wheel of her truck and allegedly started driving recklessly through the park while yelling, “I am going to kill you and run you over.”

Court documents allege Gotch fled the scene after hitting a child and running over her leg.

Police identified Gotch as the registered owner of the pickup truck and went to her home to take her into custody.

KILLER OF TUCSON GIRL WHO DISAPPEARED IN 2012 FINALLY FOUND, BUT HE IS ALREADY SERVING LIFE SENTENCE

Westgreen Park in Arizona

An Arizona mother allegedly drove her truck into Westgreen Park last month and chased after children who were fighting with her kids. (Google Maps)

While interviewed by investigators, police claim, Gotch said she saw the victims fighting with her children in the park. She also allegedly admitted to driving through the park, though she did not believe she hit any of the children.

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EX-AZ EDUCATION DEPARTMENT WORKERS USED ‘GHOST STUDENTS’ TO LAUNDER VOUCHER MONEY

“Brandie continued by stating her children are being bullied at school and have had issues with this group of kids before and reported it to the school and police but nothing has been done,” court documents read. “[Gotch] thought the bullying was being continued at the park when she drove up and saw her daughter get hit by one of the other juveniles.”

Gotch also allegedly told investigators her children were secured in the truck with seatbelts, despite her children saying otherwise.

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She was booked into jail and was held on $250,000 cash-only bond.

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