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Four different schools crowned champions after first week of March Madness Alaska

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Four different schools crowned champions after first week of March Madness Alaska


The ASAA 1A and 2A basketball divisions opened March Madness Alaska in Anchorage with tournaments spanning Wednesday to Saturday. It was madness indeed; not a single No. 1 seed won across the four tournaments. The ASAA 3A and 4A state championships begin Wednesday, March 20 and end on Saturday, March 23.

King Cove won the boys 1A title over top-seeded Kake in a battle of unbeatens, handing the defending state champions their first loss in over two years. Minto (26-3 overall), which lost to Kake in the semifinals, finished third at the state championships a week after winning the Golden Heart 1A Conference tournament at the UAF Patty Center.



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Alaska

3 fishermen accused of illegally transporting Alaska crab to Seattle for better prices

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3 fishermen accused of illegally transporting Alaska crab to Seattle for better prices


By Tess Williams

Updated: 32 seconds ago Published: 10 minutes ago

Three Alaska fishermen are facing federal charges after being accused of illegally transporting more than 7,000 pounds of crab harvested in Southeast Alaska to Seattle in hopes of getting better prices there.

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Instead, federal prosecutors say, much of the haul was wasted upon arrival in Washington state because the crab had either died or were suspected of being diseased.

Corey Potter, Justin Welch and Kyle Potter were indicted last week on charges they violated the Lacey Act. The law makes it a federal crime to break the wildlife laws of any state, tribe or foreign country, and then move or trade the wildlife across U.S. borders.

Corey Potter owned the two crab boats involved in the scheme, and his son, Kyle Potter, and Welch worked as captains, according to a brief proposing conditions of release filed by Assistant U.S. Attorney Seth Brickley. Federal prosecutors identified the boats as the Arctic Dawn and the Gambler.

The two boats harvested over 7,000 pounds of Tanner and golden king crab during February and March in Southeast Alaska, the brief said. Corey Potter directed the captains to take the crab to Seattle, where they planned to sell it at a higher price than they could get in Alaska, it said.

Alaska law requires crab boats to land at a port within the state and record harvests on a fish ticket. One purpose of the law is to detect bitter crab syndrome, a common disease caused by a parasite that’s fatal to crab, and salvage any that are not infected. By avoiding Alaska ports, the men evaded that process, according to an indictment filed in the case.

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By the time the two boats arrived in Washington, more than 1,200 pounds of king crab had died and was no longer marketable, according to the brief. Another 4,200 pounds of Tanner crab — the entire harvest — was destroyed upon arrival because some of the crab were found to have bitter crab syndrome, the brief said.

“This type of conduct has a direct impact on the future viability of the crab fishery in Alaska and steals crab from the pots of law-abiding fishermen,” Brickley wrote in the brief.

Alaska crab harvests in general have crashed in recent years as populations dwindle in warming waters.

All three men are scheduled for a first court appearance in early May.





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Two feared dead in Alaska cargo plane crash – authorities

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Two feared dead in Alaska cargo plane crash – authorities


Site of a previous plane crash in Alaska dated August 2010 (File photo only from AFP /Alaska Department of Public Safety State Troopers)

Two people were feared dead after a rare cargo plane crashed in the far north of the United States on Tuesday, troopers in Alaska said.

The Douglas DC-4, one of just a handful left in the world, came down just after leaving Fairbanks International Airport in the middle of the vast state.

Alaska State Troopers said the plane had taken off shortly before 10:00 am (1800 GMT) and crashed near the Tanana River moments later.

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“The aircraft slid into a steep hill on the bank of the river where it caught fire,” the state’s Department of Public Safety said.

“No survivors have been located.”

Unconfirmed pictures on social media showed a large fire engulfing trees.

The Federal Aviation Authority (FAA) said it would be involved in a probe into the incident.

“The FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board will investigate,” a statement said.

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“The NTSB will be the lead agency and provide any updates.”

The Douglas DC-4 was originally built during World War II.

Some of them were used in the Berlin airlift in 1948 and 1949 when Soviet forces cut off supplies to parts of the German city under Allied control.



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Plane crashes into river in Alaska

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Plane crashes into river in Alaska


SAN FRANCISCO: A Douglas DC-4 airplane has crashed into a river in Fairbanks in US state of Alaska on Tuesday, authorities said.

First responders were conducting an “active rescue” Tuesday after the plane crashed in the area of the Tanana River in Fairbanks, according to local officials, reported Xinhua.

Clint Johnson, Alaska chief of the National Transportation Safety Board, said it was not clear how many people were on the Douglas DC-4 when it crashed around 10.30 am shortly after departure south of Fairbanks International Airport.

“We acknowledge the ongoing situation involving the Douglas DC-4 aircraft on the Tanana River near Kallenberg Road,“ the airport said in a statement. “Alaska State Troopers are actively leading the response and we are cooperating with them.”

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A spokesman for Fairbanks International Airport urged the public to avoid the area.

Alaska State Troopers, along with local, state and federal agencies, were responding to the crash near Kallenberg Road on Tuesday morning.

A witness said he heard a loud explosion and saw a plane overhead with an engine on fire, according to a report by the Anchorage Daily News. – Bernama, Xinhua

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